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prius vs ?

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  • Rob Rowland
    Now if only they would make a car that fit six (2 adults, 4 teenagers) comfortably, had 4 TON towing capacity and cargo space for our Lab and Great Dane. Then
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 1, 2007
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      Now if only they would make a car that fit six (2 adults, 4 teenagers) comfortably, had 4 TON towing capacity and cargo space for our Lab and Great Dane.  Then I would gladly replace my Suburban with that vehicle.  Until then, I'm keeping the Suburban and riding the motorcycle to work on the nice days.  After what we experienced evacuating for Hurricane Rita I will never be without a single vehicle that can haul all of us + gear.  I can go nearly 600 miles on the highway before needing a filling station.  How many high gas mileage vehicles can do that?
       
      :)
       
      Rob Rowland
    • Ariel Thomann
      Sounds like elective, self-inflicted problems... I admit, Planned Parenthood would have been no help concerning the dogs and your perceived need to tow around
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 1, 2007
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        Sounds like elective, self-inflicted problems... I admit, Planned Parenthood
        would have been no help concerning the dogs and your perceived need to tow
        around more stuff than most people in the world even own. On the hopeful side,
        I think Detroit screwed up again by initially putting their hesitant, long
        overdue hybrid technology into big vehicles, but that may be what your heart
        desires. Check those out.

        With my Prius, I start thinking about gas at about 400-450 miles, but I can pace
        myself to go well over 500-550 (12 gallon tank, 44 mpg pre-ethanol, now a bit
        less -- up to about 60 mpg at steady 55-65 mph).

        Ariel ;)
        - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since
        otherwise there is NO ONE who will help.
        - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7
        generations.
        ------------------------------------

        > Now if only they would make a car that fit six (2 adults, 4 teenagers)
        > comfortably, had 4 TON towing capacity and cargo space for our Lab and Great
        > Dane. Then I would gladly replace my Suburban with that vehicle. Until then,
        > I'm keeping the Suburban and riding the motorcycle to work on the nice days.
        > After what we experienced evacuating for Hurricane Rita I will never be
        > without a single vehicle that can haul all of us + gear. I can go nearly 600
        > miles on the highway before needing a filling station. How many high gas
        > mileage vehicles can do that?
        >
        > :)
        >
        > Rob Rowland
      • Garth & Kim Travis
        Greetings, My toyota corrolla can, it gets 42 mpg and has a 15 gallon tank. I have run it 600 miles before refueling. And small cars can tow trailers, I did
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 2, 2007
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          Greetings,
          My toyota corrolla can, it gets 42 mpg and has a 15 gallon tank. I
          have run it 600 miles before refueling. And small cars can tow
          trailers, I did with my 92 honda. I now have a farm truck so I no
          longer put a hitch on my cars, but yes, they do tow. However, it will
          not carry the teenagers and dogs, just the dogs and 2 adults plus a lot
          of gear. I can pick up 8 bags of feed easily with the car.
          Bright Blessings,
          Kim

          Rob Rowland wrote:
          > Now if only they would make a car that fit six (2 adults, 4 teenagers)
          > comfortably, had 4 TON towing capacity and cargo space for our Lab and
          > Great Dane. Then I would gladly replace my Suburban with that vehicle.
          > Until then, I'm keeping the Suburban and riding the motorcycle to work
          > on the nice days. After what we experienced evacuating for Hurricane
          > Rita I will never be without a single vehicle that can haul all of us +
          > gear. I can go nearly 600 miles on the highway before needing a filling
          > station. How many high gas mileage vehicles can do that?
          >
          > :)
          >
          > Rob Rowland
          >
          >
        • Lindsey Honari
          Unless it is time to get a new car, you are better off in terms of energy consumption and emissions if you just use what you have for as long as you can.
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 7, 2007
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            Unless it is time to get a new car, you are better off in terms of energy consumption and emissions if you just use what you have for as long as you can.  Think about the resource use and emissions involved in getting the raw materials out of the ground, to process and ship the components to the manufacturing site, to manufacture the new vehicle (not to mention what the employees use to get to the factory), and the energy and emissions cost to transport that new vehicle to a show room lot. 
             
            On top of that, most Americans change cars every 3-5 years. 
             
            I would think that keeping your car or buying a used one would be equal to or greater than the energy and emissions savings by getting a hybrid or a car with better mileage.  Or, as some readers have offered in terms of upgrading homes for energy efficiency, you still make the greatest impact by changing your consumption habits.
             
            Best,
             
            Lindsey
             
             

             
            On 2/24/07, Paul Archer <tigger@...> wrote:

            My wife and I are looking for a more fuel efficient vehicle than our current
            car, a Honda Element (which gets around 20mpg). We have some negative equity
            on the Element, so we're having a hard time finding something we can afford.
            The Prius seems like a great car (and has some really geeky-cool features),
            but it's a little too expensive--not to mention the lack of room compared to
            the Element, or practically anything else.
            Does anyone have a suggestion for a vehicle that gets better-than-average
            gas mileage, won't cost too much ("too much" meaning more than $22-24k), and
            maybe has some room?

            Thanks,

            Paul

            -----------------------------------------------------
            "Somebody did say Swedish porn, there--
            but someone always does..."
            --Clive Anderson, host of "Whose Line Is It, Anyway",
            after asking the audience for movie suggestions
            -----------------------------------------------------


          • cgalvan21
            Kudos to you, Lindsey, for a fabulous response! A back-of-an-envelope calculation tells me that switching from a Suburban (est. 15mpg) to a Prius (est. 40
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 7, 2007
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              Kudos to you, Lindsey, for a fabulous response!

              A back-of-an-envelope calculation tells me that switching from a
              Suburban (est. 15mpg) to a Prius (est. 40 mpg), driving 15k miles per
              year would save about 625 gallons of gasoline per year. Assuming
              that a person holds onto his or her Suburban for an extra three years
              before buying the Prius, they will consume an extra 1875 gallons of
              gasoline, or the equivalent of an extra 69 megawatthours of energy**.

              Group: does it take more than 69 MWh to build a Prius?

              -Chris

              **Source: http://www.onlineconversion.com


              --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "Lindsey Honari" <llhonari@...> wrote:

              > Unless it is time to get a new car, you are better off in
              > terms of energy consumption and emissions if you just use
              > what you have for as long as you can. Think about the resource
              > use and emissions involved in getting the raw materials out of
              > the ground, to process and ship the components to the
              > manufacturing site, to manufacture the new vehicle (not to
              > mention what the employees use to get to the factory),
              > and the energy and emissions cost to transport that new
              > vehicle to a show room lot.
              >
              > On top of that, most Americans change cars every 3-5 years.
              >
              > I would think that keeping your car or buying a used one
              > would be equal to or greater than the energy and emissions
              > savings by getting a hybrid or a car with better mileage.
              > Or, as some readers have offered in terms of upgrading homes
              > for energy efficiency, you still make the greatest impact by
              > changing your consumption habits.
              >
              > Best,
              >
              > Lindsey
              >
            • Ariel Thomann
              I can t answer your question re building a Prius (or a twice-as-heavy Suburban). I do know my 23-1/2 month old Prius, which just had its 40K service, averaged
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 8, 2007
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                I can't answer your question re building a Prius (or a twice-as-heavy Suburban).
                I do know my 23-1/2 month old Prius, which just had its 40K service, averaged
                an honest 44 mpg all-around, until current increase in ethanol resulted in loss
                of mileage down to about 41-42 mpg.

                Peripherally related to this, the Oshkosh company is coming right along with a
                diesel-electric heavy truck for the US military.

                Ariel
                - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since
                otherwise there is NO ONE who will help.
                - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7
                generations.
                ------------------------------------

                > Kudos to you, Lindsey, for a fabulous response!
                >
                > A back-of-an-envelope calculation tells me that switching from a
                > Suburban (est. 15mpg) to a Prius (est. 40 mpg), driving 15k miles per year
                > would save about 625 gallons of gasoline per year. Assuming that a person
                > holds onto his or her Suburban for an extra three years before buying the
                > Prius, they will consume an extra 1875 gallons of gasoline, or the equivalent
                > of an extra 69 megawatthours of energy**.
                >
                > Group: does it take more than 69 MWh to build a Prius?
                >
                > -Chris
                >
                > **Source: http://www.onlineconversion.com
                >
                >
                > --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "Lindsey Honari" <llhonari@...> wrote:
                >
                >> Unless it is time to get a new car, you are better off in
                >> terms of energy consumption and emissions if you just use
                >> what you have for as long as you can. Think about the resource
                >> use and emissions involved in getting the raw materials out of
                >> the ground, to process and ship the components to the
                >> manufacturing site, to manufacture the new vehicle (not to
                >> mention what the employees use to get to the factory),
                >> and the energy and emissions cost to transport that new
                >> vehicle to a show room lot.
                >>
                >> On top of that, most Americans change cars every 3-5 years.
                >>
                >> I would think that keeping your car or buying a used one
                >> would be equal to or greater than the energy and emissions
                >> savings by getting a hybrid or a car with better mileage.
                >> Or, as some readers have offered in terms of upgrading homes
                >> for energy efficiency, you still make the greatest impact by
                >> changing your consumption habits.
                >>
                >> Best,
                >>
                >> Lindsey
                >>
              • Larry Weber, Sales
                Why buy new car? I paid $1800 for 79 mercedes 240D, 4 cyl., four door full size sedan. Rebuilt engine, new AC, etc. for $5K. Getting 35 mpg. Biodiesel will
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 8, 2007
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                  Re: [hreg] Re: prius vs ? Why buy new car?  I paid $1800 for 79 mercedes 240D, 4 cyl., four door full size sedan.  
                  Rebuilt engine, new AC, etc. for $5K.  Getting 35 mpg.  

                  Biodiesel will probably be one of the best fuels of the future, can be made from many things.
                  There are several production plants in Texas.  We are discussing with one producer to become a distributor.

                  We are also designing an under water lighting system for a customer that will be growing algae for biodiesel production.  

                  Larry weber







                  Naturallighting.com
                  1414 FM 646 RD E
                  DICKINSON, TX  77539

                  Toll Free  1.888.900.6830
                  FAX        281.559.4949

                  email:  larry@...
                  http://www.naturallighting.com

                • Robert Johnston
                  Lindsey, You are assuming that the car gets scrapped. But if it is sold to another user, (and so forth, handed down the car food chain to teenagers, etc.,
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 12, 2007
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                    Lindsey,

                     

                    You are assuming that the car gets scrapped.  But if it is sold to another user, (and so forth, handed down the “car food chain” to teenagers, etc., until it dies), then your calculus would have to be adjusted. 

                     

                    I agree with your general sentiments on hybrids and fuel efficient cars, though.  A Honda Civic is a great car, and you don’t have to replace batteries or do other expensive maintenance at 100k miles.  It is starting to come out in the press how much these repairs are costing.  That is why I shied away from them myself—the math never added up for me.  (I find it curious that many of those who eschew “corporate welfare” seem to love tax credits for hybrids.  If that isn’t corporate welfare, what is?!).


                    Robert

                     


                    From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto: hreg@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Lindsey Honari
                    Sent: Wednesday, March 07, 2007 2:22 PM
                    To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [hreg] prius vs ?

                     

                    Unless it is time to get a new car, you are better off in terms of energy consumption and emissions if you just use what you have for as long as you can.  Think about the resource use and emissions involved in getting the raw materials out of the ground, to process and ship the components to the manufacturing site, to manufacture the new vehicle (not to mention what the employees use to get to the factory), and the energy and emissions cost to transport that new vehicle to a show room lot. 

                     

                    On top of that, most Americans change cars every 3-5 years. 

                     

                    I would think that keeping your car or buying a used one would be equal to or greater than the energy and emissions savings by getting a hybrid or a car with better mileage.  Or, as some readers have offered in terms of upgrading homes for energy efficiency, you still make the greatest impact by changing your consumption habits.

                     

                    Best,

                     

                    Lindsey

                     

                     


                     

                    On 2/24/07, Paul Archer <tigger@...> wrote:

                    My wife and I are looking for a more fuel efficient vehicle than our current
                    car, a Honda Element (which gets around 20mpg). We have some negative equity
                    on the Element, so we're having a hard time finding something we can afford.
                    The Prius seems like a great car (and has some really geeky-cool features),
                    but it's a little too expensive--not to mention the lack of room compared to
                    the Element, or practically anything else.
                    Does anyone have a suggestion for a vehicle that gets better-than- average
                    gas mileage, won't cost too much ("too much" meaning more than $22-24k), and
                    maybe has some room?

                    Thanks,

                    Paul

                    ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- -----
                    "Somebody did say Swedish porn, there--
                    but someone always does..."
                    --Clive Anderson, host of "Whose Line Is It, Anyway",
                    after asking the audience for movie suggestions
                    ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- -----

                     

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