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biogenerator prototype

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  • Paul Archer
    This is pretty cool. It s a biogenerator that runs a diesel engine to produce electricity from garbage:
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 7, 2007
      This is pretty cool. It's a biogenerator that runs a diesel engine to
      produce electricity from garbage:
      http://news.uns.purdue.edu/x/2007a/070201LadischBio.html



      ----------------------------------------------------------------
      "I've started referring to the action against Iraq as
      Desert Storm 1.1, since it reminds me of a Microsoft upgrade:
      it's expensive, most people aren't sure they want it, and it
      probably won't work." -- Kevin G. Barkes
      ----------------------------------------------------------------
    • wrpretired@aol.com
      A biogenerator operating on lawn waste might be a good research project for a research organization here in the Houston area. There are tons of leaves and
      Message 2 of 13 , Feb 7, 2007
        A biogenerator operating on lawn waste might be a good research project for a research organization here in the Houston area.  There are tons of leaves and grass clippings buried in landfills every year in our area.  We taxpayers are charged for pickup, hauling and burial of this material.  Why don't we ask our elected officials to set aside a small amount of our garbage fees to fund research for turning lawn waste to power.  The funding could be coordinated through and by the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) so as to include all the counties and municipalities in the Houston area.
         
        Two research groups that come to mind are the Texas Energy Center located in Sugar Land and Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) located in The Woodlands.  Rice University and the University of Houston could also be involved.  A pilot plant could be located at a landfill site so that the cost of pickup and hauling would just about be a wash.
         
        Can we start the project by getting someone to study (1) the current cost of picking up and disposing of our lawn waste, and (2) the projected cost of separating lawn waste from household waste and getting it delivered to a proposed pilot plant.  This might be a good study for a college student.
         
        What other municipal areas in the U. S. have already done this study and/or built trash-to-power plants?
         
        I seem to recall a power plant near the 610 Loop and Hwy. 288 area that tried this back in the 70's.  It was a failure, but used a technology that burned trash in a very old converted generating plant.  So any study would of course be modeled on newer technology, perhaps the technology used to convert biomass into ethanol as is being done to produce gasohol.
         
        This is just a thought being tossed up in the air to see if it has been tossed up before, whether it has already been shot down, or whether it should be pursued.
         
        Regards,
        Warren Parker
      • Shafer, Mark B
        This is a looks great. I want to buy one that works off pine straw. ________________________________ From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com]
        Message 3 of 13 , Feb 7, 2007
          This is a looks great.  I want to buy one that works off pine straw.


          From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Archer
          Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 7:52 AM
          To: Houston RE Group
          Subject: [hreg] biogenerator prototype

          This is pretty cool. It's a biogenerator that runs a diesel engine to
          produce electricity from garbage:
          http://news. uns.purdue. edu/x/2007a/ 070201LadischBio .html

          ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
          "I've started referring to the action against Iraq as
          Desert Storm 1.1, since it reminds me of a Microsoft upgrade:
          it's expensive, most people aren't sure they want it, and it
          probably won't work." -- Kevin G. Barkes
          ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -

        • Susan Modikoane
          Count me in! I ll sign any petition or write any letters or go on any go-sees you need me to. wrpretired@aol.com wrote: A biogenerator operating on
          Message 4 of 13 , Feb 7, 2007
            Count me in!  I'll sign any petition or write any letters or go on any go-sees you need me to.

            wrpretired@... wrote:
            A biogenerator operating on lawn waste might be a good research project for a research organization here in the Houston area.  There are tons of leaves and grass clippings buried in landfills every year in our area.  We taxpayers are charged for pickup, hauling and burial of this material.  Why don't we ask our elected officials to set aside a small amount of our garbage fees to fund research for turning lawn waste to power.  The funding could be coordinated through and by the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) so as to include all the counties and municipalities in the Houston area.
             
            Two research groups that come to mind are the Texas Energy Center located in Sugar Land and Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) located in The Woodlands.  Rice University and the University of Houston could also be involved.  A pilot plant could be located at a landfill site so that the cost of pickup and hauling would just about be a wash.
             
            Can we start the project by getting someone to study (1) the current cost of picking up and disposing of our lawn waste, and (2) the projected cost of separating lawn waste from household waste and getting it delivered to a proposed pilot plant.  This might be a good study for a college student.
             
            What other municipal areas in the U. S. have already done this study and/or built trash-to-power plants?
             
            I seem to recall a power plant near the 610 Loop and Hwy. 288 area that tried this back in the 70's.  It was a failure, but used a technology that burned trash in a very old converted generating plant.  So any study would of course be modeled on newer technology, perhaps the technology used to convert biomass into ethanol as is being done to produce gasohol.
             
            This is just a thought being tossed up in the air to see if it has been tossed up before, whether it has already been shot down, or whether it should be pursued.
             
            Regards,
            Warren Parker


            Need a quick answer? Get one in minutes from people who know. Ask your question on Yahoo! Answers.

          • Kevin Conlin
            I would think Mayor Bill White might be interested in this technology, he is very progressive when it comes to energy efficiency and policy, and is taking the
            Message 5 of 13 , Feb 7, 2007

              I would think Mayor Bill White might be interested in this technology, he is very progressive when it comes to energy efficiency and policy, and is taking the initiative in making Houston more energy efficient.  I’m of the opinion that it should be illegal to improperly dispose of lawn wastes without trying to recycle this valuable resource.

               

               

              ________________________

              Kevin Conlin

              Solarcraft, Inc.

              4007 C Greenbriar

              Stafford, TX 77477-4536

              Local (281) 340-1224

              Toll Free (877) 340-1224

              Fax 281 340 1230

              kconlin@...

              www.solarcraft.net

               

              Please make a note of our new contact information above.

               


              From: wrpretired@... [mailto:wrpretired@...]
              Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 9:06 AM
              To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [hreg] biogenerator prototype

               

              A biogenerator operating on lawn waste might be a good research project for a research organization here in the Houston area.  There are tons of leaves and grass clippings buried in landfills every year in our area.  We taxpayers are charged for pickup, hauling and burial of this material.  Why don't we ask our elected officials to set aside a small amount of our garbage fees to fund research for turning lawn waste to power.  The funding could be coordinated through and by the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) so as to include all the counties and municipalities in the Houston area.

               

              Two research groups that come to mind are the Texas Energy Center located in Sugar Land and Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) located in The Woodlands.  Rice University and the University of Houston could also be involved.  A pilot plant could be located at a landfill site so that the cost of pickup and hauling would just about be a wash.

               

              Can we start the project by getting someone to study (1) the current cost of picking up and disposing of our lawn waste, and (2) the projected cost of separating lawn waste from household waste and getting it delivered to a proposed pilot plant.  This might be a good study for a college student.

               

              What other municipal areas in the U. S. have already done this study and/or built trash-to-power plants?

               

              I seem to recall a power plant near the 610 Loop and Hwy. 288 area that tried this back in the 70's.  It was a failure, but used a technology that burned trash in a very old converted generating plant.  So any study would of course be modeled on newer technology, perhaps the technology used to convert biomass into ethanol as is being done to produce gasohol.

               

              This is just a thought being tossed up in the air to see if it has been tossed up before, whether it has already been shot down, or whether it should be pursued.

               

              Regards,

              Warren Parker

            • Michael Ewert
              I heard 2nd hand that Mayor White is interested in exactly that. Perhaps we can gather more information and pass it to someone at the City. _____ From:
              Message 6 of 13 , Feb 7, 2007

                I heard 2nd hand that Mayor White is interested in exactly that.  Perhaps we can gather more information and pass it to someone at the City.

                 


                From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto: hreg@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Kevin Conlin
                Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 11:07 AM
                To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype

                 

                I would think Mayor Bill White might be interested in this technology, he is very progressive when it comes to energy efficiency and policy, and is taking the initiative in making Houston more energy efficient.  I’m of the opinion that it should be illegal to improperly dispose of lawn wastes without trying to recycle this valuable resource.

                 

                 

                ____________ _________ ___

                Kevin Conlin

                Solarcraft, Inc.

                4007 C Greenbriar

                Stafford, TX 77477-4536

                Local (281) 340-1224

                Toll Free (877) 340-1224

                Fax 281 340 1230

                kconlin@solarcraft. net

                www.solarcraft. net

                 

                Please make a note of our new contact information above.

                 


                From: wrpretired@aol. com [mailto:wrpretired@ aol.com]
                Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 9:06 AM
                To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                Subject: Re: [hreg] biogenerator prototype

                 

                A biogenerator operating on lawn waste might be a good research project for a research organization here in the Houston area.  There are tons of leaves and grass clippings buried in landfills every year in our area.  We taxpayers are charged for pickup, hauling and burial of this material.  Why don't we ask our elected officials to set aside a small amount of our garbage fees to fund research for turning lawn waste to power.  The funding could be coordinated through and by the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) so as to include all the counties and municipalities in the Houston area.

                 

                Two research groups that come to mind are the Texas Energy Center located in Sugar Land and Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) located in The Woodlands.  Rice University and the University of Houston could also be involved.  A pilot plant could be located at a landfill site so that the cost of pickup and hauling would just about be a wash.

                 

                Can we start the project by getting someone to study (1) the current cost of picking up and disposing of our lawn waste, and (2) the projected cost of separating lawn waste from household waste and getting it delivered to a proposed pilot plant.  This might be a good study for a college student.

                 

                What other municipal areas in the U. S. have already done this study and/or built trash-to-power plants?

                 

                I seem to recall a power plant near the 610 Loop and Hwy. 288 area that tried this back in the 70's.  It was a failure, but used a technology that burned trash in a very old converted generating plant.  So any study would of course be modeled on newer technology, perhaps the technology used to convert biomass into ethanol as is being done to produce gasohol.

                 

                This is just a thought being tossed up in the air to see if it has been tossed up before, whether it has already been shot down, or whether it should be pursued.

                 

                Regards,

                Warren Parker

              • Sean Kaylor
                Having moved from CA to Houston last year I was shocked when the trash delivery service came. This is the only city I ve lived in where there isn t seperate
                Message 7 of 13 , Feb 8, 2007

                  Having moved from CA to Houston last year I was shocked when the trash delivery service came. This is the only city I've lived in where there isn't seperate trash recepticles for recycling, lawn clippings and garbage. In fact I still have a stack of aluminum cans in my kitchen while I look for a convenient drop off location- pretty regressive as far as I'm concerned.

                  Biomass has gotten a lot of hype recently since it has been unjustly lumped together with corn ethanol. A lot of research has been placed in building cellulose ethanol reactors utilizing most any organic feed stock, which could be lawn clippings, to produce ethanol. Another area of biomass research is using a organic feed stock to produce glucose which is then burned in a flash vaporization reactor to produce hydrogen.

                  Considering Houston is the energy hub of the US it seems more than viable for it participate is an advanced biomass project.

                  Sean


                  From: "Michael Ewert" <mewert@...>
                  Reply-To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                  To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                  Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                  Date: Wed, 7 Feb 2007 21:56:02 -0600

                  I heard 2nd hand that Mayor White is interested in exactly that.  Perhaps we can gather more information and pass it to someone at the City.

                   


                  From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Kevin Conlin
                  Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 11:07 AM
                  To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype

                   

                  I would think Mayor Bill White might be interested in this technology, he is very progressive when it comes to energy efficiency and policy, and is taking the initiative in making Houston more energy efficient.  I�m of the opinion that it should be illegal to improperly dispose of lawn wastes without trying to recycle this valuable resource.

                   

                   

                  ____________ _________ ___

                  Kevin Conlin

                  Solarcraft, Inc.

                  4007 C Greenbriar

                  Stafford, TX 77477-4536

                  Local (281) 340-1224

                  Toll Free (877) 340-1224

                  Fax 281 340 1230

                  kconlin@solarcraft. net

                  www.solarcraft. net

                   

                  Please make a note of our new contact information above.

                   


                  From: wrpretired@aol. com [mailto:wrpretired@ aol.com]
                  Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 9:06 AM
                  To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: Re: [hreg] biogenerator prototype

                   

                  A biogenerator operating on lawn waste might be a good research project for a research organization here in the Houston area.  There are tons of leaves and grass clippings buried in landfills every year in our area.  We taxpayers are charged for pickup, hauling and burial of this material.  Why don't we ask our elected officials to set aside a small amount of our garbage fees to fund research for turning lawn waste to power.  The funding could be coordinated through and by the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) so as to include all the counties and municipalities in the Houston area.

                   

                  Two research groups that come to mind are the Texas Energy Center located in Sugar Land and Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) located in The Woodlands.  Rice University and the University of Houston could also be involved.  A pilot plant could be located at a landfill site so that the cost of pickup and hauling would just about be a wash.

                   

                  Can we start the project by getting someone to study (1) the current cost of picking up and disposing of our lawn waste, and (2) the projected cost of separating lawn waste from household waste and getting it delivered to a proposed pilot plant.  This might be a good study for a college student.

                   

                  What other municipal areas in the U. S. have already done this study and/or built trash-to-power plants?

                   

                  I seem to recall a power plant near the 610 Loop and Hwy. 288 area that tried this back in the 70's.  It was a failure, but used a technology that burned trash in a very old converted generating plant.  So any study would of course be modeled on newer technology, perhaps the technology used to convert biomass into ethanol as is being done to produce gasohol.

                   

                  This is just a thought being tossed up in the air to see if it has been tossed up before, whether it has already been shot down, or whether it should be pursued.

                   

                  Regards,

                  Warren Parker


                • Bashir Syed
                  Welcome to the Bush country, where everything is abundant, and no need for conservation or recycling! ... From: Sean Kaylor To: hreg@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                  Message 8 of 13 , Feb 8, 2007
                    Welcome to the Bush country, where everything is abundant, and no need for conservation or recycling!
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2007 3:54 PM
                    Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype

                    Having moved from CA to Houston last year I was shocked when the trash delivery service came. This is the only city I've lived in where there isn't seperate trash recepticles for recycling, lawn clippings and garbage. In fact I still have a stack of aluminum cans in my kitchen while I look for a convenient drop off location- pretty regressive as far as I'm concerned.

                    Biomass has gotten a lot of hype recently since it has been unjustly lumped together with corn ethanol. A lot of research has been placed in building cellulose ethanol reactors utilizing most any organic feed stock, which could be lawn clippings, to produce ethanol. Another area of biomass research is using a organic feed stock to produce glucose which is then burned in a flash vaporization reactor to produce hydrogen.

                    Considering Houston is the energy hub of the US it seems more than viable for it participate is an advanced biomass project.

                    Sean


                    From: "Michael Ewert" <mewert@houston. rr.com>
                    Reply-To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                    To: <hreg@yahoogroups. com>
                    Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                    Date: Wed, 7 Feb 2007 21:56:02 -0600

                    I heard 2nd hand that Mayor White is interested in exactly that.  Perhaps we can gather more information and pass it to someone at the City.

                     


                    From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Kevin Conlin
                    Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 11:07 AM
                    To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                    Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype

                     

                    I would think Mayor Bill White might be interested in this technology, he is very progressive when it comes to energy efficiency and policy, and is taking the initiative in making Houston more energy efficient.  I’m of the opinion that it should be illegal to improperly dispose of lawn wastes without trying to recycle this valuable resource.

                     

                     

                    ____________ _________ ___

                    Kevin Conlin

                    Solarcraft, Inc.

                    4007 C Greenbriar

                    Stafford, TX 77477-4536

                    Local (281) 340-1224

                    Toll Free (877) 340-1224

                    Fax 281 340 1230

                    kconlin@solarcraft. net

                    www.solarcraft. net

                     

                    Please make a note of our new contact information above.

                     


                    From: wrpretired@aol. com [mailto:wrpretired@ aol.com]
                    Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 9:06 AM
                    To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                    Subject: Re: [hreg] biogenerator prototype

                     

                    A biogenerator operating on lawn waste might be a good research project for a research organization here in the Houston area.  There are tons of leaves and grass clippings buried in landfills every year in our area.  We taxpayers are charged for pickup, hauling and burial of this material.  Why don't we ask our elected officials to set aside a small amount of our garbage fees to fund research for turning lawn waste to power.  The funding could be coordinated through and by the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) so as to include all the counties and municipalities in the Houston area.

                     

                    Two research groups that come to mind are the Texas Energy Center located in Sugar Land and Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) located in The Woodlands.  Rice University and the University of Houston could also be involved.  A pilot plant could be located at a landfill site so that the cost of pickup and hauling would just about be a wash.

                     

                    Can we start the project by getting someone to study (1) the current cost of picking up and disposing of our lawn waste, and (2) the projected cost of separating lawn waste from household waste and getting it delivered to a proposed pilot plant.  This might be a good study for a college student.

                     

                    What other municipal areas in the U. S. have already done this study and/or built trash-to-power plants?

                     

                    I seem to recall a power plant near the 610 Loop and Hwy. 288 area that tried this back in the 70's.  It was a failure, but used a technology that burned trash in a very old converted generating plant.  So any study would of course be modeled on newer technology, perhaps the technology used to convert biomass into ethanol as is being done to produce gasohol.

                     

                    This is just a thought being tossed up in the air to see if it has been tossed up before, whether it has already been shot down, or whether it should be pursued.

                     

                    Regards,

                    Warren Parker


                  • phil6142@aol.com
                    I take my cans to C & D scrap metal for recycling they are located at the corner of Durham and West 25th street. If that is convient to your house. ... From:
                    Message 9 of 13 , Feb 8, 2007
                      I take my cans to C & D scrap metal for recycling they are located at the corner of Durham and West 25th street.  If that is convient to your house.
                       
                       
                       
                       
                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: kaylorsean@...
                      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thu, 8 Feb 2007 3:54 PM
                      Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype

                      Having moved from CA to Houston last year I was shocked when the trash delivery service came. This is the only city I've lived in where there isn't seperate trash recepticles for recycling, lawn clippings and garbage. In fact I still have a stack of aluminum cans in my kitchen while I look for a convenient drop off location- pretty regressive as far as I'm concerned.
                      Biomass has gotten a lot of hype recently since it has been unjustly lumped together with corn ethanol. A lot of research has been placed in building cellulose ethanol reactors utilizing most any organic feed stock, which could be lawn clippings, to produce ethanol. Another area of biomass research is using a organic feed stock to produce glucose which is then burned in a flash vaporization reactor to produce hydrogen.
                      Considering Houston is the energy hub of the US it seems more than viable for it participate is an advanced biomass project.
                      Sean


                      From: "Michael Ewert" <mewert@houston. rr.com>
                      Reply-To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                      To: <hreg@yahoogroups. com>
                      Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                      Date: Wed, 7 Feb 2007 21:56:02 -0600

                      I heard 2nd hand that Mayor White is interested in exactly that.  Perhaps we can gather more information and pass it to someone at the City.
                       

                      From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Kevin Conlin
                      Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 11:07 AM
                      To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                       
                      I would think Mayor Bill White might be interested in this technology, he is very progressive when it comes to energy efficiency and policy, and is taking the initiative in making Houston more energy efficient.  I知 of the opinion that it should be illegal to improperly dispose of lawn wastes without trying to recycle this valuable resource.
                       
                       
                      ____________ _________ ___
                      Kevin Conlin
                      Solarcraft, Inc.
                      4007 C Greenbriar
                      Stafford, TX 77477-4536
                      Local (281) 340-1224
                      Toll Free (877) 340-1224
                      Fax 281 340 1230
                       
                      Please make a note of our new contact information above.
                       

                      From: wrpretired@aol. com [mailto:wrpretired@ aol.com]
                      Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 9:06 AM
                      To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: Re: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                       
                      A biogenerator operating on lawn waste might be a good research project for a research organization here in the Houston area.  There are tons of leaves and grass clippings buried in landfills every year in our area.  We taxpayers are charged for pickup, hauling and burial of this material.  Why don't we ask our elected officials to set aside a small amount of our garbage fees to fund research for turning lawn waste to power.  The funding could be coordinated through and by the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) so as to include all the counties and municipalities in the Houston area.
                       
                      Two research groups that come to mind are the Texas Energy Center located in Sugar Land and Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) located in The Woodlands.  Rice University and the University of Houston could also be involved.  A pilot plant could be located at a landfill site so that the cost of pickup and hauling would just about be a wash.
                       
                      Can we start the project by getting someone to study (1) the current cost of picking up and disposing of our lawn waste, and (2) the projected cost of separating lawn waste from household waste and getting it delivered to a proposed pilot plant.  This might be a good study for a college student.
                       
                      What other municipal areas in the U. S. have already done this study and/or built trash-to-power plants?
                       
                      I seem to recall a power plant near the 610 Loop and Hwy. 288 area that tried this back in the 70's.  It was a failure, but used a technology that burned trash in a very old converted generating plant.  So any study would of course be modeled on newer technology, perhaps the technology used to convert biomass into ethanol as is being done to produce gasohol.
                       
                      This is just a thought being tossed up in the air to see if it has been tossed up before, whether it has already been shot down, or whether it should be pursued.
                       
                      Regards,
                      Warren Parker


                      Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
                    • Ariel Thomann
                      The city has a number of recycling centers; sorry that I don t have time right now to google for them and provide a link. Ariel - We are all Human beings here
                      Message 10 of 13 , Feb 8, 2007
                        The city has a number of recycling centers; sorry that I don't have time right
                        now to google for them and provide a link.

                        Ariel
                        - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since
                        otherwise there is NO ONE who will help.
                        - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7
                        generations.
                        ------------------------------------

                        > I take my cans to C & D scrap metal for recycling they are located at the
                        > corner of Durham and West 25th street. If that is convient to your house.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: kaylorsean@...
                        > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Thu, 8 Feb 2007 3:54 PM
                        > Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                        >
                        >
                        > Having moved from CA to Houston last year I was shocked when the trash
                        > delivery service came. This is the only city I've lived in where there isn't
                        > seperate trash recepticles for recycling, lawn clippings and garbage. In fact
                        > I still have a stack of aluminum cans in my kitchen while I look for a
                        > convenient drop off location- pretty regressive as far as I'm concerned.
                        > Biomass has gotten a lot of hype recently since it has been unjustly lumped
                        > together with corn ethanol. A lot of research has been placed in building
                        > cellulose ethanol reactors utilizing most any organic feed stock, which could
                        > be lawn clippings, to produce ethanol. Another area of biomass research is
                        > using a organic feed stock to produce glucose which is then burned in a flash
                        > vaporization reactor to produce hydrogen. Considering Houston is the energy
                        > hub of the US it seems more than viable for it participate is an advanced
                        > biomass project. Sean
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > From: "Michael Ewert" <mewert@...>
                        > Reply-To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                        > To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                        > Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                        > Date: Wed, 7 Feb 2007 21:56:02 -0600
                        >
                        >
                        > I heard 2nd hand that Mayor White is interested in exactly that. Perhaps we
                        > can gather more information and pass it to someone at the City.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kevin
                        > Conlin Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 11:07 AM
                        > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                        >
                        > I would think Mayor Bill White might be interested in this technology, he is
                        > very progressive when it comes to energy efficiency and policy, and is taking
                        > the initiative in making Houston more energy efficient. I知 of the opinion
                        > that it should be illegal to improperly dispose of lawn wastes without trying
                        > to recycle this valuable resource.
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________
                        > Kevin Conlin
                        > Solarcraft, Inc.
                        > 4007 C Greenbriar
                        > Stafford, TX 77477-4536
                        > Local (281) 340-1224
                        > Toll Free (877) 340-1224
                        > Fax 281 340 1230
                        > kconlin@...
                        > www.solarcraft.net
                        >
                        > Please make a note of our new contact information above.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > From: wrpretired@... [mailto:wrpretired@...]
                        > Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 9:06 AM
                        > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: Re: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                        >
                        > A biogenerator operating on lawn waste might be a good research project for a
                        > research organization here in the Houston area. There are tons of leaves and
                        > grass clippings buried in landfills every year in our area. We taxpayers are
                        > charged for pickup, hauling and burial of this material. Why don't we ask our
                        > elected officials to set aside a small amount of our garbage fees to fund
                        > research for turning lawn waste to power. The funding could be coordinated
                        > through and by the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) so as to include all
                        > the counties and municipalities in the Houston area.
                        >
                        > Two research groups that come to mind are the Texas Energy Center located in
                        > Sugar Land and Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) located in The
                        > Woodlands. Rice University and the University of Houston could also be
                        > involved. A pilot plant could be located at a landfill site so that the cost
                        > of pickup and hauling would just about be a wash.
                        >
                        > Can we start the project by getting someone to study (1) the current cost of
                        > picking up and disposing of our lawn waste, and (2) the projected cost of
                        > separating lawn waste from household waste and getting it delivered to a
                        > proposed pilot plant. This might be a good study for a college student.
                        >
                        > What other municipal areas in the U. S. have already done this study and/or
                        > built trash-to-power plants?
                        >
                        > I seem to recall a power plant near the 610 Loop and Hwy. 288 area that tried
                        > this back in the 70's. It was a failure, but used a technology that burned
                        > trash in a very old converted generating plant. So any study would of course
                        > be modeled on newer technology, perhaps the technology used to convert biomass
                        > into ethanol as is being done to produce gasohol.
                        >
                        > This is just a thought being tossed up in the air to see if it has been tossed
                        > up before, whether it has already been shot down, or whether it should be
                        > pursued.
                        >
                        > Regards,
                        > Warren Parker
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________________________________________________ Check
                        > out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and security tools,
                        > free access to millions of high-quality videos from across the web, free AOL
                        > Mail and more.
                      • Lunce
                        Just go ahead and start your own reuse/recycling effort. The establishment will catch up eventually. Reuse first. Before you recycle, offer your unwanted
                        Message 11 of 13 , Feb 8, 2007
                          Just go ahead and start your own reuse/recycling effort.  The establishment will catch up eventually.

                          Reuse first.  Before you recycle, offer your unwanted treasures to those around you that may be able to use it.

                          City of Bellaire has a great recycling center on Edith and Newcastle (just inside the loop between Beechnut and Evergreen off of Newcastle).  They take newspaper, magazines, junk mail, cardboard, tin, aluminium, Clear glass, plastic 1&2. 

                          For Color glass and electronics (plus the previous list) take to Recycle center on Westpark between Fountain View and Chimney Rock (enter on Westpark)

                          Bellaire has stopped recycling their lawn/leaves for the time being (something about contracts), but anyone in the Bellaire area of town who wishes to recycle your lawn clippings/leaves please contact me off this list.  (But everyone here already reuse your lawn clippings - right??)

                          Recently Bellaire started the curb side recycling.  The good - more people who are too busy (lazy) to go to the recycle center will recycle. The Bad - dumping all recycle goods for resorting later by someone else is wasteful and a step backwards for those of us that already sort our recycling materials.  Maybe someone can come up with multiple bin trucks soon.

                          Happy Reusing and Recycling everyone!

                          Lunce

                          Sean Kaylor <kaylorsean@...> wrote:
                          Having moved from CA to Houston last year I was shocked when the trash delivery service came. This is the only city I've lived in where there isn't seperate trash recepticles for recycling, lawn clippings and garbage. In fact I still have a stack of aluminum cans in my kitchen while I look for a convenient drop off location- pretty regressive as far as I'm concerned.
                          Biomass has gotten a lot of hype recently since it has been unjustly lumped together with corn ethanol. A lot of research has been placed in building cellulose ethanol reactors utilizing most any organic feed stock, which could be lawn clippings, to produce ethanol. Another area of biomass research is using a organic feed stock to produce glucose which is then burned in a flash vaporization reactor to produce hydrogen.
                          Considering Houston is the energy hub of the US it seems more than viable for it participate is an advanced biomass project.
                          Sean


                          From: "Michael Ewert" <mewert@houston. rr.com>
                          Reply-To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                          To: <hreg@yahoogroups. com>
                          Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                          Date: Wed, 7 Feb 2007 21:56:02 -0600

                          I heard 2nd hand that Mayor White is interested in exactly that.  Perhaps we can gather more information and pass it to someone at the City.
                           

                          From: hreg@yahoogroups. com [mailto:hreg@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Kevin Conlin
                          Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 11:07 AM
                          To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: RE: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                           
                          I would think Mayor Bill White might be interested in this technology, he is very progressive when it comes to energy efficiency and policy, and is taking the initiative in making Houston more energy efficient.  I’m of the opinion that it should be illegal to improperly dispose of lawn wastes without trying to recycle this valuable resource.
                           
                           
                          ____________ _________ ___
                          Kevin Conlin
                          Solarcraft, Inc.
                          4007 C Greenbriar
                          Stafford, TX 77477-4536
                          Local (281) 340-1224
                          Toll Free (877) 340-1224
                          Fax 281 340 1230
                           
                          Please make a note of our new contact information above.
                           

                          From: wrpretired@aol. com [mailto:wrpretired@ aol.com]
                          Sent: Wednesday, February 07, 2007 9:06 AM
                          To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: Re: [hreg] biogenerator prototype
                           
                          A biogenerator operating on lawn waste might be a good research project for a research organization here in the Houston area.  There are tons of leaves and grass clippings buried in landfills every year in our area.  We taxpayers are charged for pickup, hauling and burial of this material.  Why don't we ask our elected officials to set aside a small amount of our garbage fees to fund research for turning lawn waste to power.  The funding could be coordinated through and by the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) so as to include all the counties and municipalities in the Houston area.
                           
                          Two research groups that come to mind are the Texas Energy Center located in Sugar Land and Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) located in The Woodlands.  Rice University and the University of Houston could also be involved.  A pilot plant could be located at a landfill site so that the cost of pickup and hauling would just about be a wash.
                           
                          Can we start the project by getting someone to study (1) the current cost of picking up and disposing of our lawn waste, and (2) the projected cost of separating lawn waste from household waste and getting it delivered to a proposed pilot plant.  This might be a good study for a college student.
                           
                          What other municipal areas in the U. S. have already done this study and/or built trash-to-power plants?
                           
                          I seem to recall a power plant near the 610 Loop and Hwy. 288 area that tried this back in the 70's.  It was a failure, but used a technology that burned trash in a very old converted generating plant.  So any study would of course be modeled on newer technology, perhaps the technology used to convert biomass into ethanol as is being done to produce gasohol.
                           
                          This is just a thought being tossed up in the air to see if it has been tossed up before, whether it has already been shot down, or whether it should be pursued.
                           
                          Regards,
                          Warren Parker




                        • Lunce
                          Sorry!! Forgot to clip in my previous post. Lunce wrote: Just go ahead and start your own
                          Message 12 of 13 , Feb 8, 2007
                            Sorry!!  Forgot to clip in my previous post.

                            Lunce <Lunce@...> wrote:
                            Just go ahead and start your own reuse/recycling effort.  The establishment will catch up eventually.




                          • Susan Modikoane
                            I lug all my stuff over to West University recycling. It s just off 59 (Westpark) and Kirby.
                            Message 13 of 13 , Feb 8, 2007
                              I lug all my stuff over to West University recycling.  It's just off 59 (Westpark) and Kirby.
                               
                              Sorry!!  Forgot to clip in my previous post.

                              Lunce <Lunce@lharchitects. com> wrote:
                              Just go ahead and start your own reuse/recycling effort.  The establishment will catch up eventually.






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