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Re: [hreg] Fw: solar Boeing Spectrolab

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  • Ed Sarlls
    Thanks for the additional information. Here are some more things that I found about Boeing Spectro Lab. These tidbits are mostly taken from Greg s sites and
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 8, 2006
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      Thanks for the additional information. Here are some more things that I found about Boeing Spectro Lab.
       
      These tidbits are mostly taken from Greg's sites and are necessarly out of context - hope that they are not misleading.  Does anyone in the Galveston area have one of Greg's units yet?
      Ed Sarlls
       
       
      Spectro Lab supplied PV cells to Greg Watson for his Sun Ball. Greg has some comments on:
       
       
       
       
      It looks like Boeing Spectrolab is just a PV cell supplier where Greg provides PV systems. The new cells should increase the efficiency of Greg's systems. The more terresterial PV cells used the lower the cost of Solar arrays for space craft.
       
       
      "Speectrolab's test data (available on my web site in the "Partners" section has shown that after several years in the very hot Arizona desert there is no degration in output or expected life span. Cousins of these cells power the two rovers on Mars." Greg Watson 

       
      See earlier poste from Ariel, Bashir and J.P.
    • Bashir Syed
      The other known source building an array using concentrator elements is Honeywell in saudi Arabia. I have seen the photographs. Other than that perhaps more
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 8, 2006
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        The other known source building an array using concentrator elements is Honeywell in saudi Arabia. I have seen the photographs. Other than that perhaps more data can be obtrained from Honeywell. Spectrolab cell technology is expensive compared to the single junction technology, whose efficiency can be enhanced by using Trackers. The competing technologies of CIS (or Copper-Indium-diSelenide) and Conducting Polymers (Konarka), promise cheaper PV systems (as both technologies are not dependent on Silicon).  
         
        Bashir A. Syed
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Ed Sarlls
        Sent: Friday, December 08, 2006 3:02 PM
        Subject: Re: [hreg] Fw: solar Boeing Spectrolab

        Thanks for the additional information. Here are some more things that I found about Boeing Spectro Lab.
         
        These tidbits are mostly taken from Greg's sites and are necessarly out of context - hope that they are not misleading.  Does anyone in the Galveston area have one of Greg's units yet?
        Ed Sarlls
         
         
        Spectro Lab supplied PV cells to Greg Watson for his Sun Ball. Greg has some comments on:
         
         
         
         
        It looks like Boeing Spectrolab is just a PV cell supplier where Greg provides PV systems. The new cells should increase the efficiency of Greg's systems. The more terresterial PV cells used the lower the cost of Solar arrays for space craft.
         
         
        "Speectrolab' s test data (available on my web site in the "Partners" section has shown that after several years in the very hot Arizona desert there is no degration in output or expected life span. Cousins of these cells power the two rovers on Mars." Greg Watson 

         
        See earlier poste from Ariel, Bashir and J.P.

      • Ariel Thomann
        Dear Greg: Thanks for your reply. I am eager to get my hands on one SunCube -- I thought I had put myself down for one about 13-15 months ago, when you were
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 9, 2006
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          Dear Greg:

          Thanks for your reply. I am eager to get my hands on one SunCube -- I thought I had put
          myself down for one about 13-15 months ago, when you were taking tentative orders as you
          planned to enter full production in Feb 2006 (as I recall). Last year, at the December
          Solstice (winter for us, summer for you, of course) I spent some time looking at where
          an array of 3-4 SunBalls could be installed on my son's property near Austin, Texas,
          without being shaded by trees, etc.

          Please let me know when I might get a SunCube (and co$t$, etc...) as I hope to be able
          to have it put through its paces by some folks in this area who are infinitely more
          knowledgeable technically than I am (I'm just an old dreamer).

          Thanks!

          Ariel
          - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since otherwise
          there is NO ONE who will help.
          - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7 generations.
          ------------------------------------

          > Hi Ariel,
          >
          > Yes the SunCube does use Spectrolab concentrator cells. For every 1 cm2 of cells the
          > SunCube uses (and it uses 9 cm2) it generates about the same annual electricity
          > production as 5,000 cm2 of fixed flat plate silicon cells. And it does it about 25%
          > of the cost.
          >
          > All the best,
          > Greg Watson
          > Green and Gold Energy
          > Adelaide, South Australia
          > +61 408 843 089
          > http://www.greenandgoldenergy.com.au
          > Online SunBall discussion group
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sunball
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Ariel Thomann" <ajthomann@...>
          > To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
          > Cc: <edsarlls@...>; <greg.watson@...> Sent: Friday,
          > December 08, 2006 12:56 PM
          > Subject: Re: [hreg] Fw: solar Boeing Spectorlab
          >
          >
          >> Interesting. Some 18-20 months ago I learned about the Australian 'SunBall'
          >> developed
          >> by Greg Watson at Green and Gold Energy, and have been interested in it since then,
          >> but
          >> unable to get much feedback on its availability, etc. I had hoped to get my hands
          >> on
          >> one long before now.
          >>
          >> So now I read about this Boeing approach to use of "thin plastic lenses" and
          >> "concentrators" as a great novelty. It all sounded so familiar... so I went back
          >> to the
          >> SunBall site and guess what... Check
          >> file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Owner/My%20Documents/-%20ISSUES%20and%20CAUSES/-%20ENERGY-ENVIRONMENT/Sun/SunBall/Green%20and%20Gold%20Energy.htm
          >>
          >> Could it be that the 'SunBall', and its offspring the 'SunCube', have really been
          >> the
          >> actual first applications of this technology that now Boeing is putting out for the
          >> world to see? I hope those of you who are more techno-smart than me would comment
          >> on
          >> this.
          >>
          >> Ariel
          >> - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since
          >> otherwise
          >> there is NO ONE who will help.
          >> - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7
          >> generations.
          >> ------------------------------------
          >>
          >>>
          >>> There is some duplicationof the info in J.P. Malone's message but maybe there is
          >>> some
          >>> additional info.
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> Boeing Spectrolab terrestrial solar cell surpasses 40% efficiency Spectrolab, a
          >>> wholly owned subsidiary of Boeing, has achieved a new world record in
          >>> terrestrial concentrator solar cell efficiency. Using concentrated sunlight,
          >>> Spectrolab demonstrated the ability of a
          >>> photovoltaic cell to convert 40.7 percent of received solar energy into
          >>> electricity.
          >>> The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden,
          >>> Colo.,
          >>> verified the milestone last month.
          >>> "This solar cell performance is the highest efficiency level any photovoltaic
          >>> device has ever achieved," said Spectrolab President David Lillington.
          >>> "The terrestrial cell we have developed uses the same
          >>> technology base as our space-based cells. So, once qualified, they can be
          >>> manufactured
          >>> in very high volumes with minimal impact to production flow."
          >>> Spectrolab officials say that high-efficiency multijunction cells have a
          >>> significant
          >>> advantage over conventional silicon cells in concentrator systems because fewer
          >>> solar
          >>> cells are required to achieve the same power output. This technology is expected
          >>> to
          >>> continue to dramatically reduce the cost of generating electricity from solar
          >>> energy,
          >>> as well as the cost of materials used in high-power space satellites and
          >>> terrestrial
          >>> applications.
          >>> "These results are particularly encouraging since they were achieved using a new
          >>> class
          >>> of metamorphic semiconductor materials, allowing much greater freedom in
          >>> multijunction
          >>> cell design for optimal conversion of the solar spectrum," said Spectrolab's
          >>> Richard
          >>> King, principal
          >>> investigator of the high-efficiency solar cell research and development effort.
          >>> "The
          >>> excellent performance of these materials hints at still higher efficiency in
          >>> future
          >>> solar cells."
          >>> Spectrolab is reducing the cost of solar cell production through research
          >>> investments and is working with several domestic and
          >>> international solar concentrator manufacturers on clean, renewable solar energy
          >>> solutions. Currently, Spectrolab's terrestrial concentrator cells are generating
          >>> power
          >>> in a 33-kilowatt full-scale concentrator system in the Australian desert. The
          >>> company
          >>> recently signed multimillion dollar contracts for its high-efficiency concentrator
          >>> cells and is anticipating several new contracts in the next few months. Development
          >>> of the high-efficiency concentrator cell technology was funded by the
          >>> NREL's High Performance Photovoltaics program and
          >>> Spectrolab.
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> --
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