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Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

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  • Bashir Syed
    AT&T Worldnet Service - Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures PlungeThis is the result of total dependence on conventional energy sources. When people
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 3, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      AT&T Worldnet Service - Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge
      This is the result of total dependence on conventional energy sources. When people choose alternates for the rainy days, that is the key for the survival. Everyone must have access to ALTERNATE source of Energy to meet such challenges for survival! Solar for Lighting (even inexpensive Solar Lanterns) and biomass pellets for home heating, plus emergency rations.
      AT&T Worldnet.

      Top News

      Email This PagePrint This Pagenews logo
      4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

      Updated 10:36 PM ET December 3, 2006

      image

      Audio clipListen to Audio Clip

      By BETSY TAYLOR

      ST. LOUIS (AP) - Frigid temperatures contributed to four deaths Sunday, pushing the toll from a devastating ice and snow storm to 19 as hundreds of thousands waited another day for their electricity to be restored.

      As temperatures rose into the 20s, Tawana Jean Cooper and her family sat at a Red Cross warming center in St. Louis, which they reached a day earlier from her suburban home after roads were cleared of ice, downed power lines and broken tree limbs.

      Her three young grandchildren joined her at the shelter.

      "They know this is not home. They know this is a disaster," Cooper said as she cradled her sleeping 5-month-old granddaughter in her arms.

      "The American Red Cross has been a God's blessing," she said. About six dozen others also spent the night at the shelter.

      Missouri National Guardsmen had been sent into the area to knock on doors and make sure people were safe. By early afternoon Sunday, the St. Louis temperature had reached only about 22 degrees, the National Weather Service said.

      Two men, ages 37 and 35, died after they tried to burn coal in a cooking wok to stay warm. Fire officials found deadly levels of carbon monoxide in their home. A 56-year-old man may have suffered hypothermia, and an 81-year-old man was found dead at the bottom of his home's stairs.

      "This is not over. As long as the power is still out, there are still people at risk," St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said.

      Thursday's storm spread ice and deep snow from Texas to Michigan and then blew through the Northeast late Friday and early Saturday. Thousands of travelers were stranded by canceled flights, highways clogged by abandoned vehicles and stalled trains.

      By Sunday afternoon, about 350,000 customers of St. Louis-based Ameren Corp. had no electricity in a roughly 300-mile swath from Jackson, Mo., northeast to Pontiac, Ill., paralleling the track of the storm. Spokeswoman Susan Gallagher said about 200,000 were in Missouri and about 150,000 in central and southern Illinois.

      The utility said Sunday it would not estimate when power will be totally restored.

      Trees throughout the region were glazed with a thick coat of ice that reflected the sunlight and also snapped tree limbs, bringing power lines down with them.

      "It's slow," said Ameren repairman Bernie Kutz, after completing a job in south St. Louis. "The tools are freezing somewhat, and nothing wants to work right."

      At the peak of the outages Friday, 510,000 customers were without power, Gallagher said. Hundreds of thousands also lost power in the other states hit by the storm.

      In Peoria, Ill., fire officials urged homeowners to check their roofs after a nursing home ceiling collapsed, injuring four residents.

      In Belleville, Ill., 20 miles east of St. Louis, most of the 100 cots at Westhaven Elementary School had been in use as a Red Cross shelter since noon Friday.

      For much of the region, it was a reminder of the widespread outages caused by severe thunderstorms in July, when 948,000 in Missouri and Illinois were blacked out.

      ___

      Associated Press writers Ashley M. Heher in Chicago and Jim Suhr in St. Louis contributed to this report.

      Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



      Email This PagePrint This Pagediscussion






    • Kevin Conlin
      Come on, Bashir, please don’t send 8 attachments that have absolutely nothing to do with renewables. Thanks. ________________________ Kevin Conlin
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 4, 2006
      • 0 Attachment

        Come on, Bashir, please don’t send 8 attachments that have absolutely nothing to do with renewables.

         

        Thanks.

         

         

        ________________________

        Kevin Conlin

        Solarcraft, Inc.

        4007 C Greenbriar

        Stafford, TX 77477-4536

        Local (281) 340-1224

        Toll Free (877) 340-1224

        Fax 281 340 1230

        kconlin@...

        www.solarcraft.net

         

        Please make a note of our new contact information above.

         


        From: Bashir Syed [mailto:bsyed@...]
        Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 10:17 PM
        To: Michael K Ewert
        Subject: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

         

         

        This is the result of total dependence on conventional energy sources. When people choose alternates for the rainy days, that is the key for the survival. Everyone must have access to ALTERNATE source of Energy to meet such challenges for survival! Solar for Lighting (even inexpensive Solar Lanterns) and biomass pellets for home heating, plus emergency rations.

        AT&T Worldnet.

         


        Top News


        Email This PagePrint This Pagenews logo
        4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

        Updated 10:36 PM ET December 3, 2006

        image

        Audio clipListen to Audio Clip

        By BETSY TAYLOR

        ST. LOUIS (AP) - Frigid temperatures contributed to four deaths Sunday, pushing the toll from a devastating ice and snow storm to 19 as hundreds of thousands waited another day for their electricity to be restored.

        As temperatures rose into the 20s, Tawana Jean Cooper and her family sat at a Red Cross warming center in St. Louis, which they reached a day earlier from her suburban home after roads were cleared of ice, downed power lines and broken tree limbs.

        Her three young grandchildren joined her at the shelter.

        "They know this is not home. They know this is a disaster," Cooper said as she cradled her sleeping 5-month-old granddaughter in her arms.

        "The American Red Cross has been a God's blessing," she said. About six dozen others also spent the night at the shelter.

        Missouri National Guardsmen had been sent into the area to knock on doors and make sure people were safe. By early afternoon Sunday, the St. Louis temperature had reached only about 22 degrees, the National Weather Service said.

        Two men, ages 37 and 35, died after they tried to burn coal in a cooking wok to stay warm. Fire officials found deadly levels of carbon monoxide in their home. A 56-year-old man may have suffered hypothermia, and an 81-year-old man was found dead at the bottom of his home's stairs.

        "This is not over. As long as the power is still out, there are still people at risk," St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said.

        Thursday's storm spread ice and deep snow from Texas to Michigan and then blew through the Northeast late Friday and early Saturday. Thousands of travelers were stranded by canceled flights, highways clogged by abandoned vehicles and stalled trains.

        By Sunday afternoon, about 350,000 customers of St. Louis-based Ameren Corp. had no electricity in a roughly 300-mile swath from Jackson, Mo., northeast to Pontiac, Ill., paralleling the track of the storm. Spokeswoman Susan Gallagher said about 200,000 were in Missouri and about 150,000 in central and southern Illinois.

        The utility said Sunday it would not estimate when power will be totally restored.

        Trees throughout the region were glazed with a thick coat of ice that reflected the sunlight and also snapped tree limbs, bringing power lines down with them.

        "It's slow," said Ameren repairman Bernie Kutz, after completing a job in south St. Louis. "The tools are freezing somewhat, and nothing wants to work right."

        At the peak of the outages Friday, 510,000 customers were without power, Gallagher said. Hundreds of thousands also lost power in the other states hit by the storm.

        In Peoria, Ill., fire officials urged homeowners to check their roofs after a nursing home ceiling collapsed, injuring four residents.

        In Belleville, Ill., 20 miles east of St. Louis, most of the 100 cots at Westhaven Elementary School had been in use as a Red Cross shelter since noon Friday.

        For much of the region, it was a reminder of the widespread outages caused by severe thunderstorms in July, when 948,000 in Missouri and Illinois were blacked out.

        ___

        Associated Press writers Ashley M. Heher in Chicago and Jim Suhr in St. Louis contributed to this report.

        Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

         

        Email This PagePrint This Pagediscussion









      • Bashir Syed
        Sorry for the inconvernience. This was just an effort to promote your business as well. Regards, Bashir A. Syed P.S. New Registered Name of EnerTech:
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 4, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          
          Sorry for the inconvernience. This was just an effort to promote your business as well.
          Regards,
           
          Bashir A. Syed
          P.S. New Registered Name of EnerTech:
          Alt-EnergyTech, Inc,
          1120 NASA Parkway, Ste. 220W
          Houston, TX 77058
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, December 04, 2006 12:14 PM
          Subject: RE: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

          Come on, Bashir, please don’t send 8 attachments that have absolutely nothing to do with renewables.

          Thanks.

          ____________ _________ ___

          Kevin Conlin

          Solarcraft, Inc.

          4007 C Greenbriar

          Stafford, TX 77477-4536

          Local (281) 340-1224

          Toll Free (877) 340-1224

          Fax 281 340 1230

          kconlin@solarcraft. net

          www.solarcraft. net

          Please make a note of our new contact information above.


          From: Bashir Syed [mailto:bsyed@ worldnet. att.net]
          Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 10:17 PM
          To: Michael K Ewert
          Subject: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

            

          This is the result of total dependence on conventional energy sources. When people choose alternates for the rainy days, that is the key for the survival. Everyone must have access to ALTERNATE source of Energy to meet such challenges for survival! Solar for Lighting (even inexpensive Solar Lanterns) and biomass pellets for home heating, plus emergency rations.

          AT&T Worldnet.


          Top News


          Email This PagePrint This Pagenews logo
          4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

          Updated 10:36 PM ET December 3, 2006

          image

          Audio clipListen to Audio Clip

          By BETSY TAYLOR

          ST. LOUIS (AP) - Frigid temperatures contributed to four deaths Sunday, pushing the toll from a devastating ice and snow storm to 19 as hundreds of thousands waited another day for their electricity to be restored.

          As temperatures rose into the 20s, Tawana Jean Cooper and her family sat at a Red Cross warming center in St. Louis, which they reached a day earlier from her suburban home after roads were cleared of ice, downed power lines and broken tree limbs.

          Her three young grandchildren joined her at the shelter.

          "They know this is not home. They know this is a disaster," Cooper said as she cradled her sleeping 5-month-old granddaughter in her arms.

          "The American Red Cross has been a God's blessing," she said. About six dozen others also spent the night at the shelter.

          Missouri National Guardsmen had been sent into the area to knock on doors and make sure people were safe. By early afternoon Sunday, the St. Louis temperature had reached only about 22 degrees, the National Weather Service said.

          Two men, ages 37 and 35, died after they tried to burn coal in a cooking wok to stay warm. Fire officials found deadly levels of carbon monoxide in their home. A 56-year-old man may have suffered hypothermia, and an 81-year-old man was found dead at the bottom of his home's stairs.

          "This is not over. As long as the power is still out, there are still people at risk," St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said.

          Thursday's storm spread ice and deep snow from Texas to Michigan and then blew through the Northeast late Friday and early Saturday. Thousands of travelers were stranded by canceled flights, highways clogged by abandoned vehicles and stalled trains.

          By Sunday afternoon, about 350,000 customers of St. Louis-based Ameren Corp. had no electricity in a roughly 300-mile swath from Jackson, Mo., northeast to Pontiac, Ill., paralleling the track of the storm. Spokeswoman Susan Gallagher said about 200,000 were in Missouri and about 150,000 in central and southern Illinois.

          The utility said Sunday it would not estimate when power will be totally restored.

          Trees throughout the region were glazed with a thick coat of ice that reflected the sunlight and also snapped tree limbs, bringing power lines down with them.

          "It's slow," said Ameren repairman Bernie Kutz, after completing a job in south St. Louis. "The tools are freezing somewhat, and nothing wants to work right."

          At the peak of the outages Friday, 510,000 customers were without power, Gallagher said. Hundreds of thousands also lost power in the other states hit by the storm.

          In Peoria, Ill., fire officials urged homeowners to check their roofs after a nursing home ceiling collapsed, injuring four residents.

          In Belleville, Ill., 20 miles east of St. Louis, most of the 100 cots at Westhaven Elementary School had been in use as a Red Cross shelter since noon Friday.

          For much of the region, it was a reminder of the widespread outages caused by severe thunderstorms in July, when 948,000 in Missouri and Illinois were blacked out.

          ___

          Associated Press writers Ashley M. Heher in Chicago and Jim Suhr in St. Louis contributed to this report.

          Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

          Email This PagePrint This Pagediscussion









        • Tai-Lin Hong
          It may not matter to you, Kelvin. But for Bashir, who has set his goal to make energy affordable to everyone on the planet of the earth, this incidence could
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 4, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            It may not matter to you, Kelvin. But for Bashir, who has set his goal to
            make energy affordable to everyone on the planet of the earth, this incidence could have an impact to his heart. 

            Every time I saw an SUV on the street, all I want to do is crying.
            Not even to mention how are people in Aferica, in South Asia, and in
            many parts of the world living their lifes. If we believe in God, we should all be crying.

            Kelvin, these things may have nothing to do with renewable energy. But what draw us togather in this group is already beyond energy itself.

            I am convienced the energy  is not an isolated problem.  If we have  hearts,
            we should be able to solve every problems including energy. If we don't, solving energy problem alone is not going to help much.

            Tai



            Kevin Conlin <kconlin@...> wrote:
            Come on, Bashir, please don’t send 8 attachments that have absolutely nothing to do with renewables.
             
            Thanks.
             
             
            ____________ _________ ___
            Kevin Conlin
            Solarcraft, Inc.
            4007 C Greenbriar
            Stafford, TX 77477-4536
            Local (281) 340-1224
            Toll Free (877) 340-1224
            Fax 281 340 1230
             
            Please make a note of our new contact information above.
             

            From: Bashir Syed [mailto:bsyed@ worldnet. att.net]
            Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 10:17 PM
            To: Michael K Ewert
            Subject: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge
             
              
            This is the result of total dependence on conventional energy sources. When people choose alternates for the rainy days, that is the key for the survival. Everyone must have access to ALTERNATE source of Energy to meet such challenges for survival! Solar for Lighting (even inexpensive Solar Lanterns) and biomass pellets for home heating, plus emergency rations.
            AT&T Worldnet.
             

            Top News


            Email This PagePrint This Pagenews logo
            4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge
            Updated 10:36 PM ET December 3, 2006
            image

            Audio clipListen to Audio Clip
            By BETSY TAYLOR
            ST. LOUIS (AP) - Frigid temperatures contributed to four deaths Sunday, pushing the toll from a devastating ice and snow storm to 19 as hundreds of thousands waited another day for their electricity to be restored.
            As temperatures rose into the 20s, Tawana Jean Cooper and her family sat at a Red Cross warming center in St. Louis, which they reached a day earlier from her suburban home after roads were cleared of ice, downed power lines and broken tree limbs.
            Her three young grandchildren joined her at the shelter.
            "They know this is not home. They know this is a disaster," Cooper said as she cradled her sleeping 5-month-old granddaughter in her arms.
            "The American Red Cross has been a God's blessing," she said. About six dozen others also spent the night at the shelter.
            Missouri National Guardsmen had been sent into the area to knock on doors and make sure people were safe. By early afternoon Sunday, the St. Louis temperature had reached only about 22 degrees, the National Weather Service said.
            Two men, ages 37 and 35, died after they tried to burn coal in a cooking wok to stay warm. Fire officials found deadly levels of carbon monoxide in their home. A 56-year-old man may have suffered hypothermia, and an 81-year-old man was found dead at the bottom of his home's stairs.
            "This is not over. As long as the power is still out, there are still people at risk," St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said.
            Thursday's storm spread ice and deep snow from Texas to Michigan and then blew through the Northeast late Friday and early Saturday. Thousands of travelers were stranded by canceled flights, highways clogged by abandoned vehicles and stalled trains.
            By Sunday afternoon, about 350,000 customers of St. Louis-based Ameren Corp. had no electricity in a roughly 300-mile swath from Jackson, Mo., northeast to Pontiac, Ill., paralleling the track of the storm. Spokeswoman Susan Gallagher said about 200,000 were in Missouri and about 150,000 in central and southern Illinois.
            The utility said Sunday it would not estimate when power will be totally restored.
            Trees throughout the region were glazed with a thick coat of ice that reflected the sunlight and also snapped tree limbs, bringing power lines down with them.
            "It's slow," said Ameren repairman Bernie Kutz, after completing a job in south St. Louis. "The tools are freezing somewhat, and nothing wants to work right."
            At the peak of the outages Friday, 510,000 customers were without power, Gallagher said. Hundreds of thousands also lost power in the other states hit by the storm.
            In Peoria, Ill., fire officials urged homeowners to check their roofs after a nursing home ceiling collapsed, injuring four residents.
            In Belleville, Ill., 20 miles east of St. Louis, most of the 100 cots at Westhaven Elementary School had been in use as a Red Cross shelter since noon Friday.
            For much of the region, it was a reminder of the widespread outages caused by severe thunderstorms in July, when 948,000 in Missouri and Illinois were blacked out.
            ___
            Associated Press writers Ashley M. Heher in Chicago and Jim Suhr in St. Louis contributed to this report.
            Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
             
            Email This PagePrint This Pagediscussion










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          • Kevin Conlin
            Tai, First of all, my name is Kevin, not Kelvin. We all have our soft spots and beliefs, but that is not what this website is all about, and it has nothing
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 4, 2006
            • 0 Attachment

              Tai,  First of all, my name is Kevin, not Kelvin.  We all have our soft spots and beliefs, but that is not what this website is all about, and it has nothing to do with God or bad weather in Missouri, it has to do with sharing information about renewable energy.  I merely asked Bashir not to send 8 attachments, which I and I’m sure others opened up, that have nothing to do with the topic or intent of this list.  I was merely asking him to be more considerate, and would ask you to do the same, if you want to talk philosophy or crying about SUV’s then please contact me offline and do not waste everyone’s time.

               

              Thank you.

               

               

              ________________________

              Kevin Conlin

              Solarcraft, Inc.

              4007 C Greenbriar

              Stafford, TX 77477-4536

              Local (281) 340-1224

              Toll Free (877) 340-1224

              Fax 281 340 1230

              kconlin@...

              www.solarcraft.net

               

              Please make a note of our new contact information above.

               


              From: Tai-Lin Hong [mailto:tailinux@...]
              Sent: Monday, December 04, 2006 1:50 PM
              To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

               

              It may not matter to you, Kelvin. But for Bashir, who has set his goal to
              make energy affordable to everyone on the planet of the earth, this incidence could have an impact to his heart. 

              Every time I saw an SUV on the street, all I want to do is crying.
              Not even to mention how are people in Aferica, in South Asia, and in
              many parts of the world living their lifes. If we believe in God, we should all be crying.

              Kelvin, these things may have nothing to do with renewable energy. But what draw us togather in this group is already beyond energy itself.

              I am convienced the energy  is not an isolated problem.  If we have  hearts,
              we should be able to solve every problems including energy. If we don't, solving energy problem alone is not going to help much.

              Tai



              Kevin Conlin <kconlin@solarcraft. net> wrote:

              Come on, Bashir, please don’t send 8 attachments that have absolutely nothing to do with renewables.

               

              Thanks.

               

               

              ____________ _________ ___

              Kevin Conlin

              Solarcraft, Inc.

              4007 C Greenbriar

              Stafford , TX 77477-4536

              Local (281) 340-1224

              Toll Free (877) 340-1224

              Fax 281 340 1230

               

              Please make a note of our new contact information above.

               


              From: Bashir Syed [mailto:bsyed@ worldnet. att.net]
              Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 10:17 PM
              To: Michael K Ewert
              Subject: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

               

                

              This is the result of total dependence on conventional energy sources. When people choose alternates for the rainy days, that is the key for the survival. Everyone must have access to ALTERNATE source of Energy to meet such challenges for survival! Solar for Lighting (even inexpensive Solar Lanterns) and biomass pellets for home heating, plus emergency rations.

              AT&T Worldnet.

               


              Top News



              Email This PagePrint This Pagenews logo
              4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

              Updated 10:36 PM ET December 3, 2006

              image

              Audio clipListen to Audio Clip

              By BETSY TAYLOR

              ST. LOUIS (AP) - Frigid temperatures contributed to four deaths Sunday, pushing the toll from a devastating ice and snow storm to 19 as hundreds of thousands waited another day for their electricity to be restored.

              As temperatures rose into the 20s, Tawana Jean Cooper and her family sat at a Red Cross warming center in St. Louis, which they reached a day earlier from her suburban home after roads were cleared of ice, downed power lines and broken tree limbs.

              Her three young grandchildren joined her at the shelter.

              "They know this is not home. They know this is a disaster," Cooper said as she cradled her sleeping 5-month-old granddaughter in her arms.

              "The American Red Cross has been a God's blessing," she said. About six dozen others also spent the night at the shelter.

              Missouri National Guardsmen had been sent into the area to knock on doors and make sure people were safe. By early afternoon Sunday, the St. Louis temperature had reached only about 22 degrees, the National Weather Service said.

              Two men, ages 37 and 35, died after they tried to burn coal in a cooking wok to stay warm. Fire officials found deadly levels of carbon monoxide in their home. A 56-year-old man may have suffered hypothermia, and an 81-year-old man was found dead at the bottom of his home's stairs.

              "This is not over. As long as the power is still out, there are still people at risk," St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said.

              Thursday's storm spread ice and deep snow from Texas to Michigan and then blew through the Northeast late Friday and early Saturday. Thousands of travelers were stranded by canceled flights, highways clogged by abandoned vehicles and stalled trains.

              By Sunday afternoon, about 350,000 customers of St. Louis-based Ameren Corp. had no electricity in a roughly 300-mile swath from Jackson, Mo., northeast to Pontiac, Ill., paralleling the track of the storm. Spokeswoman Susan Gallagher said about 200,000 were in Missouri and about 150,000 in central and southern Illinois.

              The utility said Sunday it would not estimate when power will be totally restored.

              Trees throughout the region were glazed with a thick coat of ice that reflected the sunlight and also snapped tree limbs, bringing power lines down with them.

              "It's slow," said Ameren repairman Bernie Kutz, after completing a job in south St. Louis. "The tools are freezing somewhat, and nothing wants to work right."

              At the peak of the outages Friday, 510,000 customers were without power, Gallagher said. Hundreds of thousands also lost power in the other states hit by the storm.

              In Peoria, Ill., fire officials urged homeowners to check their roofs after a nursing home ceiling collapsed, injuring four residents.

              In Belleville, Ill., 20 miles east of St. Louis, most of the 100 cots at Westhaven Elementary School had been in use as a Red Cross shelter since noon Friday.

              For much of the region, it was a reminder of the widespread outages caused by severe thunderstorms in July, when 948,000 in Missouri and Illinois were blacked out.

              ___

              Associated Press writers Ashley M. Heher in Chicago and Jim Suhr in St. Louis contributed to this report.

              Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

               

              Email This PagePrint This Pagediscussion











               

               


              Cheap Talk? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.



              (Message over 64 KB, truncated)
            • Bashir Syed
              Kevin: Greetings! Your point was well taken. Sometime I forget to delete the attachments. To err is human, and to forgive divine! Regards, Bashir A. Syed ...
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 4, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                
                Kevin:
                Greetings! Your point was well taken. Sometime I forget to delete the attachments. To err is human, and to forgive divine!
                Regards,
                 
                Bashir A. Syed
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, December 04, 2006 2:08 PM
                Subject: RE: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

                .

              • Kevin Conlin
                Hi Bashir, You’re forgiven!! Regards, Kevin ________________________ Kevin Conlin Solarcraft, Inc. 4007 C Greenbriar Stafford, TX 77477-4536 Local (281)
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 4, 2006
                • 0 Attachment

                  Hi Bashir, You’re forgiven!!

                   

                  Regards,  Kevin

                   

                   

                  ________________________

                  Kevin Conlin

                  Solarcraft, Inc.

                  4007 C Greenbriar

                  Stafford, TX 77477-4536

                  Local (281) 340-1224

                  Toll Free (877) 340-1224

                  Fax 281 340 1230

                  kconlin@...

                  www.solarcraft.net

                   

                  Please make a note of our new contact information above.

                   


                  From: Bashir Syed [mailto:bsyed@...]
                  Sent: Monday, December 04, 2006 7:10 PM
                  To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

                   

                   

                  Kevin:

                  Greetings! Your point was well taken. Sometime I forget to delete the attachments. To err is human, and to forgive divine!

                  Regards,

                   

                  Bashir A. Syed

                   

                  ----- Original Message -----

                  Sent: Monday, December 04, 2006 2:08 PM

                  Subject: RE: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

                   

                  .



                • Robert Johnston
                  Tempest in a teapot! This morning when I read Bashir’s message very quickly, I initially thought it was not only off-topic but off-base: claiming that the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 4, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment

                    Tempest in a teapot!

                     

                    This morning when I read Bashir’s message very quickly, I initially thought it was not only off-topic but off-base:  claiming that the deaths were due to not having renewable resources.  But Bashir is normally such a reasonable member of this forum, I couldn’t believe that he would use such poor judgment and draw such unscientific conclusions, so I read it a second and then a third time, and realized that isn’t what he was trying to say at all.  I think his point was simply that—as gulf-coast hurricane victims can also attest—natural disasters, storms, etc., lead to power outages on a regular basis.  If everyone had an emergency “off the grid” backup power supply (or heating, if living up north) and lighting source, they’d be prepared for a “rainy day”, as Bashir put it.  Read that way, I think Bashir makes a good point and it is on-topic.  Wouldn’t you agree?

                     

                    As for the 8 attachments, if you view the message in a full HTML reader, I think you’ll see that they are just embedded icons, etc., in article that he attached.  It isn’t as if Bashir attached a bunch of stuff to his text message.

                     

                    So... everyone take a deep breath and be glad you aren’t living in Missouri , and let’s chill out Texas style.  J

                     

                    Robert Johnston

                     

                     


                    From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kevin Conlin
                    Sent: Monday, December 04, 2006 2:08 PM
                    To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

                     

                    Tai,  First of all, my name is Kevin, not Kelvin.  We all have our soft spots and beliefs, but that is not what this website is all about, and it has nothing to do with God or bad weather in Missouri, it has to do with sharing information about renewable energy.  I merely asked Bashir not to send 8 attachments, which I and I’m sure others opened up, that have nothing to do with the topic or intent of this list.  I was merely asking him to be more considerate, and would ask you to do the same, if you want to talk philosophy or crying about SUV’s then please contact me offline and do not waste everyone’s time.

                     

                    Thank you.

                     

                     

                    ____________ _________ ___

                    Kevin Conlin

                    Solarcraft, Inc.

                    4007 C Greenbriar

                    Stafford, TX 77477-4536

                    Local (281) 340-1224

                    Toll Free (877) 340-1224

                    Fax 281 340 1230

                    kconlin@solarcraft. net

                    www.solarcraft. net

                     

                    Please make a note of our new contact information above.

                     


                    From: Tai-Lin Hong [mailto:tailinux@ yahoo.com]
                    Sent: Monday, December 04, 2006 1:50 PM
                    To: hreg@yahoogroups. com
                    Subject: RE: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

                     

                    It may not matter to you, Kelvin. But for Bashir, who has set his goal to
                    make energy affordable to everyone on the planet of the earth, this incidence could have an impact to his heart. 

                    Every time I saw an SUV on the street, all I want to do is crying.
                    Not even to mention how are people in Aferica, in South Asia , and in
                    many parts of the world living their lifes. If we believe in God, we should all be crying.

                    Kelvin, these things may have nothing to do with renewable energy. But what draw us togather in this group is already beyond energy itself.

                    I am convienced the energy  is not an isolated problem.  If we have  hearts,
                    we should be able to solve every problems including energy. If we don't, solving energy problem alone is not going to help much.

                    Tai



                    Kevin Conlin <kconlin@solarcraft. net> wrote:

                    Come on, Bashir, please don’t send 8 attachments that have absolutely nothing to do with renewables.

                     

                    Thanks.

                     

                     

                    ____________ _________ ___

                    Kevin Conlin

                    Solarcraft, Inc.

                    4007 C Greenbriar

                    Stafford, TX 77477-4536

                    Local (281) 340-1224

                    Toll Free (877) 340-1224

                    Fax 281 340 1230

                     

                    Please make a note of our new contact information above.

                     


                    From: Bashir Syed [mailto:bsyed@ worldnet. att.net]
                    Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 10:17 PM
                    To: Michael K Ewert
                    Subject: [hreg] Top News - 4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

                     

                      

                    This is the result of total dependence on conventional energy sources. When people choose alternates for the rainy days, that is the key for the survival. Everyone must have access to ALTERNATE source of Energy to meet such challenges for survival! Solar for Lighting (even inexpensive Solar Lanterns) and biomass pellets for home heating, plus emergency rations.

                    AT&T Worldnet.

                     


                    Top News




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                    4 Die in Missouri As Temperatures Plunge

                    Updated 10:36 PM ET December 3, 2006

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                    By BETSY TAYLOR

                    ST. LOUIS (AP) - Frigid temperatures contributed to four deaths Sunday, pushing the toll from a devastating ice and snow storm to 19 as hundreds of thousands waited another day for their electricity to be restored.

                    As temperatures rose into the 20s, Tawana Jean Cooper and her family sat at a Red Cross warming center in St. Louis , which they reached a day earlier from her suburban home after roads were cleared of ice, downed power lines and broken tree limbs.

                    Her three young grandchildren joined her at the shelter.

                    "They know this is not home. They know this is a disaster," Cooper said as she cradled her sleeping 5-month-old granddaughter in her arms.

                    "The American Red Cross has been a God's blessing," she said. About six dozen others also spent the night at the shelter.

                    Missouri National Guardsmen had been sent into the area to knock on doors and make sure people were safe. By early afternoon Sunday, the St. Louis temperature had reached only about 22 degrees, the National Weather Service said.

                    Two men, ages 37 and 35, died after they tried to burn coal in a cooking wok to stay warm. Fire officials found deadly levels of carbon monoxide in their home. A 56-year-old man may have suffered hypothermia, and an 81-year-old man was found dead at the bottom of his home's stairs.

                    "This is not over. As long as the power is still out, there are still people at risk," St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said.

                    Thursday's storm spread ice and deep snow from Texas to Michigan and then blew through the Northeast late Friday and early Saturday. Thousands of travelers were stranded by canceled flights, highways clogged by abandoned vehicles and stalled trains.

                    By Sunday afternoon, about 350,000 customers of St. Louis-based Ameren Corp. had no electricity in a roughly 300-mile swath from Jackson , Mo. , northeast to Pontiac , Ill. , paralleling the track of the storm. Spokeswoman Susan Gallagher said about 200,000 were in Missouri and about 150,000 in central and southern Illinois .

                    The utility said Sunday it would not estimate when power will be totally restored.

                    Trees throughout the region were glazed with a thick coat of ice that reflected the sunlight and also snapped tree limbs, bringing power lines down with them.

                    "It's slow," said Ameren repairman Bernie Kutz, after completing a job in south St. Louis. "The tools are freezing somewhat, and nothing wants to work right."

                    At the peak of the outages Friday, 510,000 customers were without power, Gallagher said. Hundreds of thousands also lost power in the other states hit by the storm.

                    In Peoria , Ill. , fire officials urged homeowners to check their roofs after a nursing home ceiling collapsed, injuring four residents.

                    In Belleville , Ill. , 20 miles east of St. Louis , most of the 100 cots at Westhaven Elementary School had been in use as a Red Cross shelter since noon Friday.

                    For much of the region, it was a reminder of the widespread outages caused by severe thunderstorms in July, when 948,000 in Missouri

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