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building efficiency vs style?

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  • Paul Archer
    My wife and I have decided to move to Dallas to be closer to (her) family. We ve been looking at houses, and it s gotten me thinking about building--I ve
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 7, 2006
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      My wife and I have decided to move to Dallas to be closer to (her) family.
      We've been looking at houses, and it's gotten me thinking about
      building--I've always wanted to build my own home.

      After living in a mid-century modern house (on a block of mid-century
      moderns) for several years, and especially after looking at a Cliff May
      (http://www.ranchostyle.com/gallery) house while visiting Dallas this
      weekend, I'm convinced that I want to build something in the Eichler/Cliff
      May style. (For those of you who aren't familiar with that style, it
      includes large expanses of windows, often floor to ceiling. The Cliff May we
      saw in Dallas had one room that was floor to ceiling glass on three sides!)

      So, the question is: can a modern, energy efficient home be built that
      includes that much glass? Or will there be a severe trade-off between
      efficiency and style?

      Paul



      ----------------------
      | Wanted |
      | $10,000 reward |
      | Schroedinger's Cat |
      | Dead or Alive |
      ----------------------
    • Lunce
      ... Ofcourse the answer is - it depends! First I thought you wanted a fishbowl - a la Philip Johnson s glass house. But looking at the pictures, you have lots
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 7, 2006
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        > So, the question is: can a modern, energy efficient home be built that
        > includes that much glass?
        >



        Ofcourse the answer is - it depends!

        First I thought you wanted a fishbowl - a la Philip Johnson's glass
        house. But looking at the pictures, you have lots of exterior building
        skin i.e. if the glass is facing south and protected in summer from the
        sun while allowing sunlight in during the winter months - you will have
        much better control than if you had a unprotected west exposure.

        Have you visited Animal Farm? (which has been on the HREG tour for the
        past 2 years). The main level has glass on all 4 sides floor to
        ceiling. But since the overhangs are large and the sun never strikes
        the glass, and the space is so positioned for natural ventilation within
        the nest of trees, it accommodates the climate.


        > Or will there be a severe trade-off between
        > efficiency and style?
        >

        >
        >
        >

        Obviously there is always a trade off. How severe depends on how much
        you are willing to alter your lifestyle to be in balance with what you
        wish to achieve.

        Cheers :)

        Lunce
      • Garth & Kim Travis
        Greetings, While I am not an architect or engineer, what I have discovered is that you need a lot of open space, ie windows to remove the heat generated by
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 7, 2006
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          Greetings,

          While I am not an architect or engineer, what I have discovered is
          that you need a lot of open space, ie windows to remove the heat
          generated by living. Perhaps you could look at windows that open,
          rather than glass and get what you want in an efficient home. Making
          use of prevailing winds really cuts cooling costs as you don't need
          to turn on the AC until much later in the year and can turn it off at
          night when the temperature drops, like the last few nights. While it
          has been down in the 60s F at night, very few people have a home that
          can take advantage of this. The heat generating appliances keep our
          interior temperature too high and it is difficult to remove that
          heat. I built my place to take advantage of the wind and I really
          notice the difference it can make.

          Bright Blessings,
          Kim


          At 09:21 AM 9/7/2006, you wrote:
          >My wife and I have decided to move to Dallas to be closer to (her) family.
          >We've been looking at houses, and it's gotten me thinking about
          >building--I've always wanted to build my own home.
          >
          >After living in a mid-century modern house (on a block of mid-century
          >moderns) for several years, and especially after looking at a Cliff May
          >(http://www.ranchostyle.com/gallery) house while visiting Dallas this
          >weekend, I'm convinced that I want to build something in the Eichler/Cliff
          >May style. (For those of you who aren't familiar with that style, it
          >includes large expanses of windows, often floor to ceiling. The Cliff May we
          >saw in Dallas had one room that was floor to ceiling glass on three sides!)
          >
          >So, the question is: can a modern, energy efficient home be built that
          >includes that much glass? Or will there be a severe trade-off between
          >efficiency and style?
          >
          >Paul
          >
          >
          >
          >----------------------
          >| Wanted |
          >| $10,000 reward |
          >| Schroedinger's Cat |
          >| Dead or Alive |
          >----------------------
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Paul Archer
          Thanks for the response. I hadn t been thinking about how passive solar would make a difference (the large overhangs). And I haven t had a chance to get out to
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 7, 2006
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            Thanks for the response. I hadn't been thinking about how passive solar
            would make a difference (the large overhangs).
            And I haven't had a chance to get out to the Animal Farm, although I'd very
            much like to sometime.

            Paul


            10:11am, Lunce wrote:

            >
            >> So, the question is: can a modern, energy efficient home be built that
            >> includes that much glass?
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            > Ofcourse the answer is - it depends!
            >
            > First I thought you wanted a fishbowl - a la Philip Johnson's glass
            > house. But looking at the pictures, you have lots of exterior building
            > skin i.e. if the glass is facing south and protected in summer from the
            > sun while allowing sunlight in during the winter months - you will have
            > much better control than if you had a unprotected west exposure.
            >
            > Have you visited Animal Farm? (which has been on the HREG tour for the
            > past 2 years). The main level has glass on all 4 sides floor to
            > ceiling. But since the overhangs are large and the sun never strikes
            > the glass, and the space is so positioned for natural ventilation within
            > the nest of trees, it accommodates the climate.
            >
            >
            >> Or will there be a severe trade-off between
            >> efficiency and style?
            >>
            >
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            > Obviously there is always a trade off. How severe depends on how much
            > you are willing to alter your lifestyle to be in balance with what you
            > wish to achieve.
            >
            > Cheers :)
            >
            > Lunce
            >



            ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
            echo '[q]sa[ln0=aln256%Pln256/snlbx]sb3135071790101768542287578439snlbxq'|dc
            (It's safe)
            ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
          • Paul Archer
            That s a good idea. Of course, I want to take advantage of nature as much as possible. I think part of my problem right now is that the house I m in is very
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 7, 2006
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              That's a good idea. Of course, I want to take advantage of nature as much as
              possible.
              I think part of my problem right now is that the house I'm in is very poorly
              designed as far as efficiency goes. It has a flat roof with inadequate
              insulation (and no easy way to add more), and poor airflow. I have to run
              the A/C pretty much year round (until it gets *cold* outside). So I've been
              in the mindset of "houses are inefficient."
              Yet the house next to us, with its deep eaves and high roof, stays cool with very little
              A/C use. So I know things can be better.

              Paul


              10:35am, Garth & Kim Travis wrote:

              > Greetings,
              >
              > While I am not an architect or engineer, what I have discovered is
              > that you need a lot of open space, ie windows to remove the heat
              > generated by living. Perhaps you could look at windows that open,
              > rather than glass and get what you want in an efficient home. Making
              > use of prevailing winds really cuts cooling costs as you don't need
              > to turn on the AC until much later in the year and can turn it off at
              > night when the temperature drops, like the last few nights. While it
              > has been down in the 60s F at night, very few people have a home that
              > can take advantage of this. The heat generating appliances keep our
              > interior temperature too high and it is difficult to remove that
              > heat. I built my place to take advantage of the wind and I really
              > notice the difference it can make.
              >
              > Bright Blessings,
              > Kim
              >
              >
              > At 09:21 AM 9/7/2006, you wrote:
              >> My wife and I have decided to move to Dallas to be closer to (her) family.
              >> We've been looking at houses, and it's gotten me thinking about
              >> building--I've always wanted to build my own home.
              >>
              >> After living in a mid-century modern house (on a block of mid-century
              >> moderns) for several years, and especially after looking at a Cliff May
              >> (http://www.ranchostyle.com/gallery) house while visiting Dallas this
              >> weekend, I'm convinced that I want to build something in the Eichler/Cliff
              >> May style. (For those of you who aren't familiar with that style, it
              >> includes large expanses of windows, often floor to ceiling. The Cliff May we
              >> saw in Dallas had one room that was floor to ceiling glass on three sides!)
              >>
              >> So, the question is: can a modern, energy efficient home be built that
              >> includes that much glass? Or will there be a severe trade-off between
              >> efficiency and style?
              >>
              >> Paul
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> ----------------------
              >> | Wanted |
              >> | $10,000 reward |
              >> | Schroedinger's Cat |
              >> | Dead or Alive |
              >> ----------------------
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Yahoo! Groups Links
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
              >



              -----------------------------------------------------
              "Somebody did say Swedish porn, there--
              but someone always does..."
              --Clive Anderson, host of "Whose Line Is It, Anyway",
              after asking the audience for movie suggestions
              -----------------------------------------------------
            • Shafer, Mark B
              Having had a house with lots of glass on the East and West side (just regular glass- not double paned), we experienced temps in the house higher than ambient
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 7, 2006
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                Having had a house with lots of glass on the East and West side (just
                regular glass- not double paned), we experienced temps in the house
                higher than ambient outside temps. Having a house now that faces north,
                few east and west windows, the greatest heat source is the southern
                window exposure.

                If you're building up North, the suggestions are to have lots of
                southern window exposure to capture the natural heat of the sun. In the
                south or in the Dallas area I would suggest lot's of glass on the
                northern side of the house with a covered porch - limited windows on the
                east, west, and south side of the house.

                You'll probably be looking at 110 degrees during a Dallas summer.

                Use of winds as Kim says is a great idea. Down in Corpus Christi, old
                farm houses seemed cool in spite of the heat. High ceiling, built on
                blocks, and window placement to catch the constant breeze worked well
                before air conditioning. You can also use plants that shade in summer
                and drop leaves allowing solar heating in winter.

                Good luck on your new adventure. Update us on what you do and how well
                it works.

                -----Original Message-----
                From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                Lunce
                Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2006 10:11 AM
                To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [hreg] building efficiency vs style?


                > So, the question is: can a modern, energy efficient home be built that
                > includes that much glass?
                >



                Ofcourse the answer is - it depends!

                First I thought you wanted a fishbowl - a la Philip Johnson's glass
                house. But looking at the pictures, you have lots of exterior building
                skin i.e. if the glass is facing south and protected in summer from the
                sun while allowing sunlight in during the winter months - you will have
                much better control than if you had a unprotected west exposure.

                Have you visited Animal Farm? (which has been on the HREG tour for the
                past 2 years). The main level has glass on all 4 sides floor to
                ceiling. But since the overhangs are large and the sun never strikes
                the glass, and the space is so positioned for natural ventilation within

                the nest of trees, it accommodates the climate.


                > Or will there be a severe trade-off between
                > efficiency and style?
                >

                >
                >
                >

                Obviously there is always a trade off. How severe depends on how much
                you are willing to alter your lifestyle to be in balance with what you
                wish to achieve.

                Cheers :)

                Lunce




                Yahoo! Groups Links
              • Andrew McCalla
                Paul, Beware of blue-sky radiation (it isn t just direct type that will be heating you up). The more glass you have, the more imperative it is that you buy
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 7, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Paul,

                  Beware of blue-sky radiation (it isn't just direct type that will be heating
                  you up).

                  The more glass you have, the more imperative it is that you buy nice glass,
                  which is a good idea regardless.

                  Keep us all posted,

                  Andrew H. McCalla
                  NABCEP Certified Solar PV System Installer (TM)

                  Meridian Energy Systems
                  2300 S. Lamar, Ste. 107
                  Austin, TX 78704

                  Voice: (512) 448-0055
                  Fax: (512) 448-0045
                  www.meridiansolar.com




                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul
                  Archer
                  Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2006 9:21 AM
                  To: Houston RE Group
                  Subject: [hreg] building efficiency vs style?

                  My wife and I have decided to move to Dallas to be closer to (her) family.
                  We've been looking at houses, and it's gotten me thinking about
                  building--I've always wanted to build my own home.

                  After living in a mid-century modern house (on a block of mid-century
                  moderns) for several years, and especially after looking at a Cliff May
                  (http://www.ranchostyle.com/gallery) house while visiting Dallas this
                  weekend, I'm convinced that I want to build something in the Eichler/Cliff
                  May style. (For those of you who aren't familiar with that style, it
                  includes large expanses of windows, often floor to ceiling. The Cliff May we

                  saw in Dallas had one room that was floor to ceiling glass on three sides!)

                  So, the question is: can a modern, energy efficient home be built that
                  includes that much glass? Or will there be a severe trade-off between
                  efficiency and style?

                  Paul



                  ----------------------
                  | Wanted |
                  | $10,000 reward |
                  | Schroedinger's Cat |
                  | Dead or Alive |
                  ----------------------




                  Yahoo! Groups Links
                • dpatterson@guardian.com
                  If you are going to use large expanses of glass note the following: 1) be sure to use at a minimum double silver low e. And you might consider triple silver
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 7, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    If you are going to use large expanses of glass note the following:
                    1) be sure to use at a minimum double silver low e. And you might consider
                    triple silver low e that is just not entering the market.
                    2) of course the glass must be insulated. Anytime you use low emissivity
                    glass it will be insulatated.
                    3) you also should consider the spacer material for the insulated units.
                    SuperSpacer by Edgetech is a very low conducting spacer material.
                    4) also considering putting argon gas in the air space of the ig units.
                    5) If you are going to be using large pieces of glass and you don't want to
                    see the mullion of the window then you might consider using the "spider
                    claw" system of hanging pieces together. This is expensive but it look
                    very modern and used a great deal in Europe.
                    6) You should also consider a large overhand on the top of the roof if
                    possible to give the glass shading.
                    7) if $$ is not obstacle the latest in glass technology is glass that can
                    go from transparent to translucent with a flick of the switch. You can
                    actually turn a knob to allow more light to less light into the window.
                    8) and lastly BIPV - give heliovolt in Austin , Tx a call to see if you can
                    beta test their "building integrated photo voltaic" solar panels. The
                    solar panels would acutally be in the glass and the energy absorbed during
                    the day would go to lighting and cooling your house.


                    Deron V. Patterson
                    District Sales Manager| Guardian Industries Corp. | (Tel: 281.793.3618 | 2
                    Fax: 281.313.4271 | š dpatterson@...| http://www.guardian.com/ |
                    http://www.sun-guardglass.com/ | http://www.showerguardglass.com/ |
                    http://www.climaguardspf.com/



                    "Andrew McCalla"
                    <andrew@meridians
                    olar.com> To
                    Sent by: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                    hreg@yahoogroups. cc
                    com
                    Subject
                    RE: [hreg] building efficiency vs
                    09/07/2006 11:30 style?
                    AM


                    Please respond to
                    hreg@yahoogroups.
                    com






                    Paul,

                    Beware of blue-sky radiation (it isn't just direct type that will be
                    heating
                    you up).

                    The more glass you have, the more imperative it is that you buy nice glass,
                    which is a good idea regardless.

                    Keep us all posted,

                    Andrew H. McCalla
                    NABCEP Certified Solar PV System Installer (TM)

                    Meridian Energy Systems
                    2300 S. Lamar, Ste. 107
                    Austin, TX 78704

                    Voice: (512) 448-0055
                    Fax: (512) 448-0045
                    www.meridiansolar.com

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul
                    Archer
                    Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2006 9:21 AM
                    To: Houston RE Group
                    Subject: [hreg] building efficiency vs style?

                    My wife and I have decided to move to Dallas to be closer to (her) family.
                    We've been looking at houses, and it's gotten me thinking about
                    building--I've always wanted to build my own home.

                    After living in a mid-century modern house (on a block of mid-century
                    moderns) for several years, and especially after looking at a Cliff May
                    (http://www.ranchostyle.com/gallery) house while visiting Dallas this
                    weekend, I'm convinced that I want to build something in the Eichler/Cliff
                    May style. (For those of you who aren't familiar with that style, it
                    includes large expanses of windows, often floor to ceiling. The Cliff May
                    we

                    saw in Dallas had one room that was floor to ceiling glass on three sides!)

                    So, the question is: can a modern, energy efficient home be built that
                    includes that much glass? Or will there be a severe trade-off between
                    efficiency and style?

                    Paul

                    ----------------------
                    | Wanted |
                    | $10,000 reward |
                    | Schroedinger's Cat |
                    | Dead or Alive |
                    ----------------------

                    Yahoo! Groups Links




                    **********************************************************************
                    This communication may contain information that is legally privileged, confidential, or exempt from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient, please note that any dissemination, distribution, or copying is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error please notify the sender by telephone, fax, or return email and delete this message from your computer. Thank you.
                    **********************************************************************
                  • dpatterson@guardian.com
                    oh and one more thing.........be sure to use one lite of the insultated unit laminated glass. Laminated glass like in your windshield blocks out 99.9% of the
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 7, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      oh and one more thing.........be sure to use one lite of the insultated
                      unit laminated glass. Laminated glass like in your windshield blocks out
                      99.9% of the UVA and UVA harmful fading rays and cancer causing rays from
                      entering your house. Or you can use Guardian's newest product ClimaGuard
                      SPF glass.
                      See the link below.

                      Deron V. Patterson
                      District Sales Manager| Guardian Industries Corp. | (Tel: 281.793.3618 | 2
                      Fax: 281.313.4271 | š dpatterson@...| http://www.guardian.com/ |
                      http://www.sun-guardglass.com/ | http://www.showerguardglass.com/ |
                      http://www.climaguardspf.com/



                      "Andrew McCalla"
                      <andrew@meridians
                      olar.com> To
                      Sent by: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                      hreg@yahoogroups. cc
                      com
                      Subject
                      RE: [hreg] building efficiency vs
                      09/07/2006 11:30 style?
                      AM


                      Please respond to
                      hreg@yahoogroups.
                      com






                      Paul,

                      Beware of blue-sky radiation (it isn't just direct type that will be
                      heating
                      you up).

                      The more glass you have, the more imperative it is that you buy nice glass,
                      which is a good idea regardless.

                      Keep us all posted,

                      Andrew H. McCalla
                      NABCEP Certified Solar PV System Installer (TM)

                      Meridian Energy Systems
                      2300 S. Lamar, Ste. 107
                      Austin, TX 78704

                      Voice: (512) 448-0055
                      Fax: (512) 448-0045
                      www.meridiansolar.com

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul
                      Archer
                      Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2006 9:21 AM
                      To: Houston RE Group
                      Subject: [hreg] building efficiency vs style?

                      My wife and I have decided to move to Dallas to be closer to (her) family.
                      We've been looking at houses, and it's gotten me thinking about
                      building--I've always wanted to build my own home.

                      After living in a mid-century modern house (on a block of mid-century
                      moderns) for several years, and especially after looking at a Cliff May
                      (http://www.ranchostyle.com/gallery) house while visiting Dallas this
                      weekend, I'm convinced that I want to build something in the Eichler/Cliff
                      May style. (For those of you who aren't familiar with that style, it
                      includes large expanses of windows, often floor to ceiling. The Cliff May
                      we

                      saw in Dallas had one room that was floor to ceiling glass on three sides!)

                      So, the question is: can a modern, energy efficient home be built that
                      includes that much glass? Or will there be a severe trade-off between
                      efficiency and style?

                      Paul

                      ----------------------
                      | Wanted |
                      | $10,000 reward |
                      | Schroedinger's Cat |
                      | Dead or Alive |
                      ----------------------

                      Yahoo! Groups Links




                      **********************************************************************
                      This communication may contain information that is legally privileged, confidential, or exempt from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient, please note that any dissemination, distribution, or copying is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error please notify the sender by telephone, fax, or return email and delete this message from your computer. Thank you.
                      **********************************************************************
                    • Ariel Thomann
                      Paul: what will you be doing the weekend of 22-24 Sep? Consider going to the Renewable Energy Roundup in Fredericksburg [ http://www.theroundup.org/ ] with
                      Message 10 of 10 , Sep 7, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Paul: what will you be doing the weekend of 22-24 Sep? Consider going to the
                        Renewable Energy Roundup in Fredericksburg [ http://www.theroundup.org/ ] with an
                        enroute stop in Austin to experience the breezeway between the admin building and the
                        cafeteria at the Lady Bird Center [ http://www.wildflower.org/ ]. At the latter you may
                        also get ideas about landscaping with native plants requiring less maintenance, water,
                        etc. Enjoy!

                        Ariel
                        - We are all Human beings here together. We have to help one another, since otherwise
                        there is NO ONE who will help.
                        - All countries need a NO REGRETS strategic energy policy. Think ahead 7 generations.
                        -----------------------------------

                        > If you are going to use large expanses of glass note the following:
                        1) be sure to use
                        > at a minimum double silver low e. And you might consider
                        triple silver low e that is
                        > just not entering the market.
                        > 2) of course the glass must be insulated. Anytime you use low emissivity
                        glass it
                        > will be insulatated.
                        > 3) you also should consider the spacer material for the insulated units.
                        SuperSpacer
                        > by Edgetech is a very low conducting spacer material.
                        4) also considering putting
                        > argon gas in the air space of the ig units.
                        5) If you are going to be using large
                        > pieces of glass and you don't want to
                        see the mullion of the window then you might
                        > consider using the "spider
                        claw" system of hanging pieces together. This is
                        > expensive but it look
                        very modern and used a great deal in Europe.
                        > 6) You should also consider a large overhand on the top of the roof if
                        possible to
                        > give the glass shading.
                        > 7) if $$ is not obstacle the latest in glass technology is glass that can
                        go from
                        > transparent to translucent with a flick of the switch. You can
                        actually turn a knob
                        > to allow more light to less light into the window.
                        8) and lastly BIPV - give
                        > heliovolt in Austin , Tx a call to see if you can
                        beta test their "building
                        > integrated photo voltaic" solar panels. The
                        solar panels would acutally be in the
                        > glass and the energy absorbed during
                        the day would go to lighting and cooling your
                        > house.
                        >
                        >
                        > Deron V. Patterson
                        > District Sales Manager| Guardian Industries Corp. | (Tel: 281.793.3618 | 2
                        Fax:
                        > 281.313.4271 | Å¡ dpatterson@...| http://www.guardian.com/ |
                        http://www.sun-guardglass.com/ | http://www.showerguardglass.com/ |
                        http://www.climaguardspf.com/
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > "Andrew McCalla"
                        > <andrew@meridians
                        olar.com>
                        > To
                        Sent by:
                        > <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                        hreg@yahoogroups.
                        > cc
                        com
                        >
                        > Subject
                        > RE: [hreg] building efficiency vs
                        > 09/07/2006 11:30 style?
                        AM
                        >
                        >

                        > Please respond to
                        > hreg@yahoogroups.
                        > com
                        >

                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Paul,
                        >
                        > Beware of blue-sky radiation (it isn't just direct type that will be
                        heating
                        > you up).
                        >
                        > The more glass you have, the more imperative it is that you buy nice glass,
                        which is
                        > a good idea regardless.
                        >
                        > Keep us all posted,
                        >
                        > Andrew H. McCalla
                        > NABCEP Certified Solar PV System Installer (TM)
                        >
                        > Meridian Energy Systems
                        > 2300 S. Lamar, Ste. 107
                        > Austin, TX 78704
                        >
                        > Voice: (512) 448-0055
                        > Fax: (512) 448-0045
                        > www.meridiansolar.com
                        >
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul
                        Archer
                        > Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2006 9:21 AM
                        > To: Houston RE Group
                        > Subject: [hreg] building efficiency vs style?
                        >
                        > My wife and I have decided to move to Dallas to be closer to (her) family.
                        We've been
                        > looking at houses, and it's gotten me thinking about
                        > building--I've always wanted to build my own home.
                        >
                        > After living in a mid-century modern house (on a block of mid-century
                        moderns) for
                        > several years, and especially after looking at a Cliff May
                        > (http://www.ranchostyle.com/gallery) house while visiting Dallas this
                        weekend, I'm
                        > convinced that I want to build something in the Eichler/Cliff
                        May style. (For those
                        > of you who aren't familiar with that style, it
                        includes large expanses of windows,
                        > often floor to ceiling. The Cliff May
                        we
                        >
                        > saw in Dallas had one room that was floor to ceiling glass on three sides!)

                        > So, the question is: can a modern, energy efficient home be built that
                        includes that
                        > much glass? Or will there be a severe trade-off between
                        efficiency and style?
                        >
                        > Paul
                        >
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