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Tribune-Review on Americans for Balanced Energy Speech

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  • Jonathan Clemens
    HREG, Please find below a timely and relevant article involving a new organization called Amercans for Balanced Energy Choices (ABEC) and their support of
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 4, 2000
      HREG,

      Please find below a timely and relevant article involving a new organization
      called "Amercans for Balanced Energy Choices" (ABEC) and their support of
      coal-powered electricity generation. They bring up good points about the
      increasing electricity demand and the difficulties in the storage and
      distribution of natural gas intended for all of the new plants (designed for
      gas).

      ABEC folks say there is no magic bullet in the realm of energy solutions.
      An RE professional voiced his opinion about the subject. The upshot to the
      article is the coal and electric industry's insistence on using coal to
      power the increased electricity demand in the decades ahead. Scary.

      This article is timely, in that it follows yesterday's HREG general meeting
      where DSM (Demand Side Management) and Deregulation were discussed,
      featuring Mack Mansfield from Reliant Energy. Mack noted that funding for
      DSM is down. Also scary.

      Jonathan

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Sierra Club PA" <sierraclub.pa@...>
      To: <CONS-SPST-ENERGY-FORUM@...>
      Sent: Monday, December 04, 2000 8:50 AM
      Subject: Fw: Tribune-Review on Americans for Balanced Energy Speech


      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: <Energyflak@...>
      > To: <barak@...>; <geriunger@...>;
      > <andrew_altman@...>; <rclark@...>;
      > <crawford@...>; <PAENVIRON@...>; <ddesmond@...>;
      > <anng@...>; <davidhughes@...>; <jimm@...>;
      > <bam48@...>; <alden@...>; <evg@...>;
      > <ftugwell@...>; Brent Beerley <brent.beerley@...>;
      > <kevin_porter@...>; Mary Whitney <maryw@...>;
      > <johnsrud@...>; <kforeilly@...>; <LAesch@...>;
      > <morrisca@...>; <sierraclub.pa@...>;
      > <swade@...>; <kgreely@...>; <NonukesHW@...>;
      > <rodisio@...>; <davidmasur@...>; <s.seppi@...>;
      > <jsinker@...>; <kirkbrown@...>;
      > <lizrob@...>; <mfioren@...>;
      > <mountcastle@...>; <Jefferso
      > Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2000 10:21 PM
      > Subject: Tribune-Review on Americans for Balanced Energy Speech
      >
      >
      > Business News - Saturday, December 02, 2000
      >
      > Cheap, plentiful electricity group's goal
      >
      > By William Opalka
      > TRIBUNE-REVIEW
      >
      > Americans have gotten used to cheap and plentiful energy, but a national
      > energy policy with "balance" must be developed for those conditions to
      > continue, a former Bush administration energy official told civic
      > leaders
      > Friday in Pittsburgh.
      >
      > "Our focus is on electricity, because that is what's moving our
      > economy,"
      > said Linda Stuntz, former deputy secretary of energy in the Bush
      > administration, who is now in private law practice in Washington.
      >
      > "Balanced" means keeping coal an important part of U.S. electricity
      > generation, according to Americans for Balanced Energy Choices, a
      > co-sponsor
      > of yesterday's luncheon on U.S. energy policy at the Westin William Penn
      > Hotel in downtown Pittsburgh. Washington-based ABEC and the Greater
      > Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce were co-sponsors.
      >
      > Joe Lucas, vice president of communications for ABEC, said Stuntz "has
      > had
      > the opportunity to advise the man who is about to become president," in
      > a
      > reference to George W. Bush.
      >
      > ABEC is sponsoring an energy study, "In Search of a National Energy
      > Strategy," that Stuntz and two former Democratic government officials
      > are
      > writing. It is expected to be released in mid-January.
      >
      > Stuntz said key points of the study will include:
      >
      >
      >
      > Development of diverse fuel sources,
      >
      >
      > Accelerated research and development,
      >
      >
      > An integrated approach to environmental matters,
      >
      >
      > Extending the time frame to address global warming concerns.
      >
      > Lucas said the organization was started nine months ago and has 12,000
      > members, including 1,500 in Pennsylvania. He said one-third of its more
      > than
      > $5 million budget was contributed by investor-owned utilities and rural
      > electric cooperatives.
      >
      > Lucas said the group is seeking to become an active part in a national
      > dialogue about energy policy "because there are some who would like to
      > take
      > coal out of the energy mix."
      >
      > Coal in 1998 accounted for 56 percent of the nation's electricity
      > generation
      > and 61 percent of Pennsylvania's.
      >
      > After Stuntz's speech, a member of the audience disputed both the data
      > and
      > perspective she offered. Bill Hopwood, owner of Springhouse Energy
      > Systems of
      > Washington County, a 20-year-old solar and wind power company, said
      > Stuntz
      > inaccurately depicted as minuscule the contribution that renewable
      > energy
      > sources could make.
      >
      > "They are advocating coal with providing more than one-half. Is that
      > balanced?" he asked.
      >
      > Stuntz, citing figures from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy
      > Information Administration, said Americans used 1.4 billion kilowatts of
      > electricity in 1970. The latest projection is 4.8 billion kilowatts
      > could be
      > used yearly by 2020.
      >
      > She said it is virtually impossible to produce that much electricity
      > without
      > coal as an important generation resource.
      >
      > ABEC said industry has spent $50 billion in the past 30 years on cleaner
      > coal-burning technology.
      >
      > She warned against the tendency of industry and government to
      > concentrate on
      > "fuel fads," a single energy resource to solve the nation's needs.
      > "There is
      > no silver bullet out there," Stuntz said.
      >
      > She cited nuclear power and oil as past examples of a primary
      > alternative
      > that failed to solve America's energy needs, and fears natural gas has
      > become
      > the latest single-source solution.
      >
      > Electric utility companies nationwide, including several in
      > Pennsylvania,
      > this year have announced construction projects for thousands of
      > megawatts of
      > electric generating capacity. Almost all will rely on natural gas as the
      > primary energy source.
      >
      > "I like natural gas, but I don't believe we can build enough (storage
      > and
      > delivery) facilities" to keep up with the projected demand over the next
      > several decades, she said in an interview.
      >
      > And she pointed out that natural gas prices hit record highs this week,
      > with
      > spot market prices topping $6.50 per thousand cubic feet.
      >
      > Renewable resources, like solar and wind power and biomass, will only
      > contribute a small amount to the nation's energy needs, she said.
      >
      >
      > Jeanne K. Clark
      > Media Specialist
      > Citizens for Pennsylvania's Future (PennFuture)
      > 412-736-6092 (cellular phone)
      >
      > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      > For SC email list T-and-C, send: GET TERMS-AND-CONDITIONS.CURRENT
      > to listserv@...
    • EXT-Mendell, Christopher N
      Jonathan, Thanks for sharing this news item. Aside from the usual myopia and the masterfully spin doctored fossil fuel tyrany oozing from the article: Just
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 4, 2000
        Jonathan,
        Thanks for sharing this news item. Aside from the usual myopia and the
        masterfully spin doctored fossil fuel tyrany oozing from the article:
        Just imagine having spent $50 billion over the past 30 years on renewable
        energy technology research & development. It boggles my mind.
        Chris Mendell

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Jonathan Clemens [SMTP:jclem412@...]
        > Sent: Monday, December 04, 2000 4:21 PM
        > To: hreg@egroups.com
        > Subject: [hreg] Tribune-Review on Americans for Balanced Energy
        > Speech
        >
        > HREG,
        >
        > Please find below a timely and relevant article involving a new
        > organization
        > called "Amercans for Balanced Energy Choices" (ABEC) and their support of
        > coal-powered electricity generation. They bring up good points about the
        > increasing electricity demand and the difficulties in the storage and
        > distribution of natural gas intended for all of the new plants (designed
        > for
        > gas).
        >
        > ABEC folks say there is no magic bullet in the realm of energy solutions.
        > An RE professional voiced his opinion about the subject. The upshot to
        > the
        > article is the coal and electric industry's insistence on using coal to
        > power the increased electricity demand in the decades ahead. Scary.
        >
        > This article is timely, in that it follows yesterday's HREG general
        > meeting
        > where DSM (Demand Side Management) and Deregulation were discussed,
        > featuring Mack Mansfield from Reliant Energy. Mack noted that funding for
        > DSM is down. Also scary.
        >
        > Jonathan
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Sierra Club PA" <sierraclub.pa@...>
        > To: <CONS-SPST-ENERGY-FORUM@...>
        > Sent: Monday, December 04, 2000 8:50 AM
        > Subject: Fw: Tribune-Review on Americans for Balanced Energy Speech
        >
        >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: <Energyflak@...>
        > > To: <barak@...>; <geriunger@...>;
        > > <andrew_altman@...>; <rclark@...>;
        > > <crawford@...>; <PAENVIRON@...>; <ddesmond@...>;
        > > <anng@...>; <davidhughes@...>; <jimm@...>;
        > > <bam48@...>; <alden@...>; <evg@...>;
        > > <ftugwell@...>; Brent Beerley <brent.beerley@...>;
        > > <kevin_porter@...>; Mary Whitney <maryw@...>;
        > > <johnsrud@...>; <kforeilly@...>; <LAesch@...>;
        > > <morrisca@...>; <sierraclub.pa@...>;
        > > <swade@...>; <kgreely@...>; <NonukesHW@...>;
        > > <rodisio@...>; <davidmasur@...>; <s.seppi@...>;
        > > <jsinker@...>; <kirkbrown@...>;
        > > <lizrob@...>; <mfioren@...>;
        > > <mountcastle@...>; <Jefferso
        > > Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2000 10:21 PM
        > > Subject: Tribune-Review on Americans for Balanced Energy Speech
        > >
        > >
        > > Business News - Saturday, December 02, 2000
        > >
        > > Cheap, plentiful electricity group's goal
        > >
        > > By William Opalka
        > > TRIBUNE-REVIEW
        > >
        > > Americans have gotten used to cheap and plentiful energy, but a national
        > > energy policy with "balance" must be developed for those conditions to
        > > continue, a former Bush administration energy official told civic
        > > leaders
        > > Friday in Pittsburgh.
        > >
        > > "Our focus is on electricity, because that is what's moving our
        > > economy,"
        > > said Linda Stuntz, former deputy secretary of energy in the Bush
        > > administration, who is now in private law practice in Washington.
        > >
        > > "Balanced" means keeping coal an important part of U.S. electricity
        > > generation, according to Americans for Balanced Energy Choices, a
        > > co-sponsor
        > > of yesterday's luncheon on U.S. energy policy at the Westin William Penn
        > > Hotel in downtown Pittsburgh. Washington-based ABEC and the Greater
        > > Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce were co-sponsors.
        > >
        > > Joe Lucas, vice president of communications for ABEC, said Stuntz "has
        > > had
        > > the opportunity to advise the man who is about to become president," in
        > > a
        > > reference to George W. Bush.
        > >
        > > ABEC is sponsoring an energy study, "In Search of a National Energy
        > > Strategy," that Stuntz and two former Democratic government officials
        > > are
        > > writing. It is expected to be released in mid-January.
        > >
        > > Stuntz said key points of the study will include:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Development of diverse fuel sources,
        > >
        > >
        > > Accelerated research and development,
        > >
        > >
        > > An integrated approach to environmental matters,
        > >
        > >
        > > Extending the time frame to address global warming concerns.
        > >
        > > Lucas said the organization was started nine months ago and has 12,000
        > > members, including 1,500 in Pennsylvania. He said one-third of its more
        > > than
        > > $5 million budget was contributed by investor-owned utilities and rural
        > > electric cooperatives.
        > >
        > > Lucas said the group is seeking to become an active part in a national
        > > dialogue about energy policy "because there are some who would like to
        > > take
        > > coal out of the energy mix."
        > >
        > > Coal in 1998 accounted for 56 percent of the nation's electricity
        > > generation
        > > and 61 percent of Pennsylvania's.
        > >
        > > After Stuntz's speech, a member of the audience disputed both the data
        > > and
        > > perspective she offered. Bill Hopwood, owner of Springhouse Energy
        > > Systems of
        > > Washington County, a 20-year-old solar and wind power company, said
        > > Stuntz
        > > inaccurately depicted as minuscule the contribution that renewable
        > > energy
        > > sources could make.
        > >
        > > "They are advocating coal with providing more than one-half. Is that
        > > balanced?" he asked.
        > >
        > > Stuntz, citing figures from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy
        > > Information Administration, said Americans used 1.4 billion kilowatts of
        > > electricity in 1970. The latest projection is 4.8 billion kilowatts
        > > could be
        > > used yearly by 2020.
        > >
        > > She said it is virtually impossible to produce that much electricity
        > > without
        > > coal as an important generation resource.
        > >
        > > ABEC said industry has spent $50 billion in the past 30 years on cleaner
        > > coal-burning technology.
        > >
        > > She warned against the tendency of industry and government to
        > > concentrate on
        > > "fuel fads," a single energy resource to solve the nation's needs.
        > > "There is
        > > no silver bullet out there," Stuntz said.
        > >
        > > She cited nuclear power and oil as past examples of a primary
        > > alternative
        > > that failed to solve America's energy needs, and fears natural gas has
        > > become
        > > the latest single-source solution.
        > >
        > > Electric utility companies nationwide, including several in
        > > Pennsylvania,
        > > this year have announced construction projects for thousands of
        > > megawatts of
        > > electric generating capacity. Almost all will rely on natural gas as the
        > > primary energy source.
        > >
        > > "I like natural gas, but I don't believe we can build enough (storage
        > > and
        > > delivery) facilities" to keep up with the projected demand over the next
        > > several decades, she said in an interview.
        > >
        > > And she pointed out that natural gas prices hit record highs this week,
        > > with
        > > spot market prices topping $6.50 per thousand cubic feet.
        > >
        > > Renewable resources, like solar and wind power and biomass, will only
        > > contribute a small amount to the nation's energy needs, she said.
        > >
        > >
        > > Jeanne K. Clark
        > > Media Specialist
        > > Citizens for Pennsylvania's Future (PennFuture)
        > > 412-736-6092 (cellular phone)
        > >
        > > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        > > For SC email list T-and-C, send: GET TERMS-AND-CONDITIONS.CURRENT
        > > to listserv@...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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