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RE: [hreg] Re: Solar economics

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  • LENIO, JAMES A. (JIM) (JSC-DL4)
    Please remove me too from your email distribution. Thanks for all the good info and insight. Jim ... From: Ida G Morello [mailto:igm@flash.net] Sent:
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 23, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Please remove me too from your email distribution. Thanks for all the good
      info and insight.



      Jim




      -----Original Message-----
      From: Ida G Morello [mailto:igm@...]
      Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2000 12:28 PM
      To: hreg@egroups.com
      Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: Solar economics


      Do not send me any further info.. Thanks.. tmm..


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Jim Syzdek <jksyzdek@...>
      To: <hreg@egroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, October 20, 2000 3:29 PM
      Subject: [hreg] Re: Solar economics


      > Kevin,
      > Hi. I'm a new member just picked up from the NASA Health and Safety
      > day at JSC. I read Jonathan's presentation and it looked really
      > good. He did a great job. I agree with you on your comment:
      >
      > >We get several calls a week from people wanting to lower their
      > >utility bills and I have to tell them that solar doesn't make sense
      > >if you are already connected to the grid.
      >
      > I have been looking at being an independent self sufficient
      > individual for years and how I can make this happen. My first steps
      > have been to reduce my existing use of energy as you suggested. I
      > have lowered my monthly electric bill by about $30-$40 a month just
      > by replacing most incadescents with flourescents, getting rid of
      > waterbeds with heater, using an electronic thermostat for the A/C,
      > using gas instead of electricity for clothes drying.
      > Solar electric is expensive at present, as we all are aware, but
      > there are little things that people in the cities can do to start the
      > transition to solar power. Some being: getting rid of incadescent
      > lights and use flourescents(these are getting very reasonably
      > priced), use solar screens on your windows, getting rid of electric
      > driers if you have gas, and use the electronic thermostats for A/C,
      > getting rid of phantom loads throughout your house, just to name a
      > few. Also, there are small solar powered devices out there that
      > don't cost too much, that will give them the feel good aspect of
      > using solar, such as solar powered outdoor lights with motion sensor,
      > solar radios, solar powered attic vent fans, solar powered lamps, and
      > many, many, more items. These items can be found in magazines just
      > about everywhere.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Jim Syzdek
      >
      > --- In hreg@egroups.com, "Kevin L. Conlin" <kconlin@s...> wrote:
      > > Hi Jonathan, Liked your presentation on solar economics, sorry I
      > didn't see it in person in Fredricksburg. We get several calls a week
      > from people wanting to lower their utility bills and I have to tell
      > them that solar doesn't make sense if you are already connected to
      > the grid. From their reaction I'm sure this puts people off, but
      > it's the truth, and I'm not big on selling people expensive things
      > they really don't need. I usually tell them that they should conserve
      > the energy they are now buying rather than try to generate their own,
      > but most people are attracted to the quick fix and seem to think that
      > solar can offer a magic solution to their problems. The intuitive
      > friendliness people seem to have towards solar has created a lot of
      > opportunities for con artists in the past, and has left a lot of
      > disappointed customers in their wake. I wish I had a better answer
      > for them, but I have neither the time or patience to get into all
      > the economic details of renewables, conservation, social costs,
      > environmental impact, etc... This is why I chose to sell to industry,
      > not consumers. On the other hand, I don't want to discourage them
      > completely, so I really don't know the best way to handle these
      > inquiries other than to refer them to HREG, TX-SES or TREIA. Any
      > thoughts or suggestions? Does anyone in HREG want to talk to these
      > people, or have a better answer than I do? Keep up the good work!
      > regards, Kevin Conlin
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: Solarcraft
      > > To: Kevin L. Conlin
      > > Sent: Monday, October 09, 2000 10:25 AM
      > > Subject: Fw: [hreg] Economics of RE Part 2
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: Jonathan Clemens
      > > To: hreg@egroups.com
      > > Sent: Saturday, October 07, 2000 1:14 PM
      > > Subject: [hreg] Economics of RE Part 2
      > >
      > >
      > > HREG,
      > >
      > > FYI, Part 2 of 2 attached re: Economics of RE charts provided at
      > the Roundup. Part 2 contains the appendix items. The original
      > powerpoint file was split into two parts in order to comply with the
      > egroups maximum of 1MB sized messages.
      > >
      > > Jonathan
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Marjorie N Wood
      Maybe one thing all of us in regional groups could do would be to buy a huge batch of CFs at wholesale and sell them at that price to neighborhoods and
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 23, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        Maybe one thing all of us in regional groups could do would be to buy a
        huge batch of CFs at wholesale and sell them at that price to
        neighborhoods and members. Friday I went into a nice hardware and they
        wanted $26 for a name brand compact fluorescent. I know we should be able
        to do better than that.
        Marge

        On Fri, 20 Oct 2000 15:29:35 -0000 "Jim Syzdek" <jksyzdek@...>
        writes:
        > Kevin,
        > Hi. I'm a new member just picked up from the NASA Health and
        > Safety
        > day at JSC. I read Jonathan's presentation and it looked really
        > good. He did a great job. I agree with you on your comment:
        >
        > >We get several calls a week from people wanting to lower their
        > >utility bills and I have to tell them that solar doesn't make sense
        >
        > >if you are already connected to the grid.
        >
        > I have been looking at being an independent self sufficient
        > individual for years and how I can make this happen. My first steps
        >
        > have been to reduce my existing use of energy as you suggested. I
        > have lowered my monthly electric bill by about $30-$40 a month just
        > by replacing most incadescents with flourescents, getting rid of
        > waterbeds with heater, using an electronic thermostat for the A/C,
        > using gas instead of electricity for clothes drying.
        > Solar electric is expensive at present, as we all are aware, but
        > there are little things that people in the cities can do to start
        > the
        > transition to solar power. Some being: getting rid of incadescent
        > lights and use flourescents(these are getting very reasonably
        > priced), use solar screens on your windows, getting rid of electric
        > driers if you have gas, and use the electronic thermostats for A/C,
        > getting rid of phantom loads throughout your house, just to name a
        > few. Also, there are small solar powered devices out there that
        > don't cost too much, that will give them the feel good aspect of
        > using solar, such as solar powered outdoor lights with motion
        > sensor,
        > solar radios, solar powered attic vent fans, solar powered lamps,
        > and
        > many, many, more items. These items can be found in magazines just
        > about everywhere.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Jim Syzdek
        >
        > --- In hreg@egroups.com, "Kevin L. Conlin" <kconlin@s...> wrote:
        > > Hi Jonathan, Liked your presentation on solar economics, sorry I
        > didn't see it in person in Fredricksburg. We get several calls a
        > week
        > from people wanting to lower their utility bills and I have to tell
        > them that solar doesn't make sense if you are already connected to
        > the grid. From their reaction I'm sure this puts people off, but
        > it's the truth, and I'm not big on selling people expensive things
        > they really don't need. I usually tell them that they should
        > conserve
        > the energy they are now buying rather than try to generate their
        > own,
        > but most people are attracted to the quick fix and seem to think
        > that
        > solar can offer a magic solution to their problems. The intuitive
        > friendliness people seem to have towards solar has created a lot of
        > opportunities for con artists in the past, and has left a lot of
        > disappointed customers in their wake. I wish I had a better answer
        > for them, but I have neither the time or patience to get into all
        > the economic details of renewables, conservation, social costs,
        > environmental impact, etc... This is why I chose to sell to
        > industry,
        > not consumers. On the other hand, I don't want to discourage them
        > completely, so I really don't know the best way to handle these
        > inquiries other than to refer them to HREG, TX-SES or TREIA. Any
        > thoughts or suggestions? Does anyone in HREG want to talk to these
        > people, or have a better answer than I do? Keep up the good work!
        >
        > regards, Kevin Conlin
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: Solarcraft
        > > To: Kevin L. Conlin
        > > Sent: Monday, October 09, 2000 10:25 AM
        > > Subject: Fw: [hreg] Economics of RE Part 2
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: Jonathan Clemens
        > > To: hreg@egroups.com
        > > Sent: Saturday, October 07, 2000 1:14 PM
        > > Subject: [hreg] Economics of RE Part 2
        > >
        > >
        > > HREG,
        > >
        > > FYI, Part 2 of 2 attached re: Economics of RE charts provided at
        >
        > the Roundup. Part 2 contains the appendix items. The original
        > powerpoint file was split into two parts in order to comply with the
        >
        > egroups maximum of 1MB sized messages.
        > >
        > > Jonathan
        >
        >
        > -------------------------- eGroups Sponsor
        >
        >
        >
      • Steve Stelzer
        IKEA has very reasonably priced compact fluorescents. Check them out. ... From: Marjorie N Wood [mailto:othermother6@juno.com] Sent: Monday, October 23, 2000
        Message 3 of 19 , Oct 23, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          IKEA has very reasonably priced compact fluorescents. Check them out.

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Marjorie N Wood [mailto:othermother6@...]
          Sent: Monday, October 23, 2000 1:44 PM
          To: hreg@egroups.com
          Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: Solar economics


          Maybe one thing all of us in regional groups could do would be to buy a
          huge batch of CFs at wholesale and sell them at that price to
          neighborhoods and members. Friday I went into a nice hardware and they
          wanted $26 for a name brand compact fluorescent. I know we should be able
          to do better than that.
          Marge

          On Fri, 20 Oct 2000 15:29:35 -0000 "Jim Syzdek" <jksyzdek@...>
          writes:
          > Kevin,
          > Hi. I'm a new member just picked up from the NASA Health and
          > Safety
          > day at JSC. I read Jonathan's presentation and it looked really
          > good. He did a great job. I agree with you on your comment:
          >
          > >We get several calls a week from people wanting to lower their
          > >utility bills and I have to tell them that solar doesn't make sense
          >
          > >if you are already connected to the grid.
          >
          > I have been looking at being an independent self sufficient
          > individual for years and how I can make this happen. My first steps
          >
          > have been to reduce my existing use of energy as you suggested. I
          > have lowered my monthly electric bill by about $30-$40 a month just
          > by replacing most incadescents with flourescents, getting rid of
          > waterbeds with heater, using an electronic thermostat for the A/C,
          > using gas instead of electricity for clothes drying.
          > Solar electric is expensive at present, as we all are aware, but
          > there are little things that people in the cities can do to start
          > the
          > transition to solar power. Some being: getting rid of incadescent
          > lights and use flourescents(these are getting very reasonably
          > priced), use solar screens on your windows, getting rid of electric
          > driers if you have gas, and use the electronic thermostats for A/C,
          > getting rid of phantom loads throughout your house, just to name a
          > few. Also, there are small solar powered devices out there that
          > don't cost too much, that will give them the feel good aspect of
          > using solar, such as solar powered outdoor lights with motion
          > sensor,
          > solar radios, solar powered attic vent fans, solar powered lamps,
          > and
          > many, many, more items. These items can be found in magazines just
          > about everywhere.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Jim Syzdek
          >
          > --- In hreg@egroups.com, "Kevin L. Conlin" <kconlin@s...> wrote:
          > > Hi Jonathan, Liked your presentation on solar economics, sorry I
          > didn't see it in person in Fredricksburg. We get several calls a
          > week
          > from people wanting to lower their utility bills and I have to tell
          > them that solar doesn't make sense if you are already connected to
          > the grid. From their reaction I'm sure this puts people off, but
          > it's the truth, and I'm not big on selling people expensive things
          > they really don't need. I usually tell them that they should
          > conserve
          > the energy they are now buying rather than try to generate their
          > own,
          > but most people are attracted to the quick fix and seem to think
          > that
          > solar can offer a magic solution to their problems. The intuitive
          > friendliness people seem to have towards solar has created a lot of
          > opportunities for con artists in the past, and has left a lot of
          > disappointed customers in their wake. I wish I had a better answer
          > for them, but I have neither the time or patience to get into all
          > the economic details of renewables, conservation, social costs,
          > environmental impact, etc... This is why I chose to sell to
          > industry,
          > not consumers. On the other hand, I don't want to discourage them
          > completely, so I really don't know the best way to handle these
          > inquiries other than to refer them to HREG, TX-SES or TREIA. Any
          > thoughts or suggestions? Does anyone in HREG want to talk to these
          > people, or have a better answer than I do? Keep up the good work!
          >
          > regards, Kevin Conlin
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: Solarcraft
          > > To: Kevin L. Conlin
          > > Sent: Monday, October 09, 2000 10:25 AM
          > > Subject: Fw: [hreg] Economics of RE Part 2
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: Jonathan Clemens
          > > To: hreg@egroups.com
          > > Sent: Saturday, October 07, 2000 1:14 PM
          > > Subject: [hreg] Economics of RE Part 2
          > >
          > >
          > > HREG,
          > >
          > > FYI, Part 2 of 2 attached re: Economics of RE charts provided at
          >
          > the Roundup. Part 2 contains the appendix items. The original
          > powerpoint file was split into two parts in order to comply with the
          >
          > egroups maximum of 1MB sized messages.
          > >
          > > Jonathan
          >
          >
          > -------------------------- eGroups Sponsor
          >
          >
          >
        • Dmeengr@aol.com
          Please discontinue using my old e-mail address dmeengr@aol.com You may reach me at dmeengr@nwol.net David
          Message 4 of 19 , Oct 25, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            Please discontinue using my old e-mail address

            dmeengr@...

            You may reach me at

            dmeengr@...

            David
          • Jim & Kathi Syzdek
            Marjorie, Home Depot has the swirling type of ligjts for around $8 -$9. These lights use 15W for 60W equivalent light. They also have 20W size for 75W
            Message 5 of 19 , Oct 26, 2000
            • 0 Attachment
              Marjorie,
              Home Depot has the swirling type of ligjts for around $8 -$9. These
              lights use 15W for 60W equivalent light. They also have 20W size for 75W
              equivalent light. They fit in the same space as a regular incadescent light
              bulb in most applications. I have seen these same CFs at other stores also.
              Jim


              >From: Marjorie N Wood <othermother6@...>
              >Reply-To: hreg@egroups.com
              >To: hreg@egroups.com
              >Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: Solar economics
              >Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2000 13:43:35 -0500
              >
              >Maybe one thing all of us in regional groups could do would be to buy a
              >huge batch of CFs at wholesale and sell them at that price to
              >neighborhoods and members. Friday I went into a nice hardware and they
              >wanted $26 for a name brand compact fluorescent. I know we should be able
              >to do better than that.
              >Marge
              >
              >On Fri, 20 Oct 2000 15:29:35 -0000 "Jim Syzdek" <jksyzdek@...>
              >writes:
              > > Kevin,
              > > Hi. I'm a new member just picked up from the NASA Health and
              > > Safety
              > > day at JSC. I read Jonathan's presentation and it looked really
              > > good. He did a great job. I agree with you on your comment:
              > >
              > > >We get several calls a week from people wanting to lower their
              > > >utility bills and I have to tell them that solar doesn't make sense
              > >
              > > >if you are already connected to the grid.
              > >
              > > I have been looking at being an independent self sufficient
              > > individual for years and how I can make this happen. My first steps
              > >
              > > have been to reduce my existing use of energy as you suggested. I
              > > have lowered my monthly electric bill by about $30-$40 a month just
              > > by replacing most incadescents with flourescents, getting rid of
              > > waterbeds with heater, using an electronic thermostat for the A/C,
              > > using gas instead of electricity for clothes drying.
              > > Solar electric is expensive at present, as we all are aware, but
              > > there are little things that people in the cities can do to start
              > > the
              > > transition to solar power. Some being: getting rid of incadescent
              > > lights and use flourescents(these are getting very reasonably
              > > priced), use solar screens on your windows, getting rid of electric
              > > driers if you have gas, and use the electronic thermostats for A/C,
              > > getting rid of phantom loads throughout your house, just to name a
              > > few. Also, there are small solar powered devices out there that
              > > don't cost too much, that will give them the feel good aspect of
              > > using solar, such as solar powered outdoor lights with motion
              > > sensor,
              > > solar radios, solar powered attic vent fans, solar powered lamps,
              > > and
              > > many, many, more items. These items can be found in magazines just
              > > about everywhere.
              > >
              > > Thanks,
              > > Jim Syzdek
              > >
              > > --- In hreg@egroups.com, "Kevin L. Conlin" <kconlin@s...> wrote:
              > > > Hi Jonathan, Liked your presentation on solar economics, sorry I
              > > didn't see it in person in Fredricksburg. We get several calls a
              > > week
              > > from people wanting to lower their utility bills and I have to tell
              > > them that solar doesn't make sense if you are already connected to
              > > the grid. From their reaction I'm sure this puts people off, but
              > > it's the truth, and I'm not big on selling people expensive things
              > > they really don't need. I usually tell them that they should
              > > conserve
              > > the energy they are now buying rather than try to generate their
              > > own,
              > > but most people are attracted to the quick fix and seem to think
              > > that
              > > solar can offer a magic solution to their problems. The intuitive
              > > friendliness people seem to have towards solar has created a lot of
              > > opportunities for con artists in the past, and has left a lot of
              > > disappointed customers in their wake. I wish I had a better answer
              > > for them, but I have neither the time or patience to get into all
              > > the economic details of renewables, conservation, social costs,
              > > environmental impact, etc... This is why I chose to sell to
              > > industry,
              > > not consumers. On the other hand, I don't want to discourage them
              > > completely, so I really don't know the best way to handle these
              > > inquiries other than to refer them to HREG, TX-SES or TREIA. Any
              > > thoughts or suggestions? Does anyone in HREG want to talk to these
              > > people, or have a better answer than I do? Keep up the good work!
              > >
              > > regards, Kevin Conlin
              > > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > > From: Solarcraft
              > > > To: Kevin L. Conlin
              > > > Sent: Monday, October 09, 2000 10:25 AM
              > > > Subject: Fw: [hreg] Economics of RE Part 2
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > > From: Jonathan Clemens
              > > > To: hreg@egroups.com
              > > > Sent: Saturday, October 07, 2000 1:14 PM
              > > > Subject: [hreg] Economics of RE Part 2
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > HREG,
              > > >
              > > > FYI, Part 2 of 2 attached re: Economics of RE charts provided at
              > >
              > > the Roundup. Part 2 contains the appendix items. The original
              > > powerpoint file was split into two parts in order to comply with the
              > >
              > > egroups maximum of 1MB sized messages.
              > > >
              > > > Jonathan
              > >
              > >
              > > -------------------------- eGroups Sponsor
              > >
              > >
              > >

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            • Marjorie N Wood
              Thanks! I will go take a look. Marge On Thu, 26 Oct 2000 10:30:07 CDT Jim & Kathi Syzdek
              Message 6 of 19 , Oct 26, 2000
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks! I will go take a look. Marge

                On Thu, 26 Oct 2000 10:30:07 CDT "Jim & Kathi Syzdek"
                <jksyzdek@...> writes:
                > Marjorie,
                > Home Depot has the swirling type of ligjts for around $8 -$9.
                > These
                > lights use 15W for 60W equivalent light. They also have 20W size
                > for 75W
                > equivalent light. They fit in the same space as a regular
                > incadescent light
                > bulb in most applications. I have seen these same CFs at other
                > stores also.
                > Jim
                >
                >
                > >From: Marjorie N Wood <othermother6@...>
                > >Reply-To: hreg@egroups.com
                > >To: hreg@egroups.com
                > >Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: Solar economics
                > >Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2000 13:43:35 -0500
                > >
                > >Maybe one thing all of us in regional groups could do would be to
                > buy a
                > >huge batch of CFs at wholesale and sell them at that price to
                > >neighborhoods and members. Friday I went into a nice hardware and
                > they
                > >wanted $26 for a name brand compact fluorescent. I know we should
                > be able
                > >to do better than that.
                > >Marge
                > >
                > >On Fri, 20 Oct 2000 15:29:35 -0000 "Jim Syzdek"
                > <jksyzdek@...>
                > >writes:
                > > > Kevin,
                > > > Hi. I'm a new member just picked up from the NASA Health and
                > > > Safety
                > > > day at JSC. I read Jonathan's presentation and it looked really
                > > > good. He did a great job. I agree with you on your comment:
                > > >
                > > > >We get several calls a week from people wanting to lower their
                > > > >utility bills and I have to tell them that solar doesn't make
                > sense
                > > >
                > > > >if you are already connected to the grid.
                > > >
                > > > I have been looking at being an independent self sufficient
                > > > individual for years and how I can make this happen. My first
                > steps
                > > >
                > > > have been to reduce my existing use of energy as you suggested.
                > I
                > > > have lowered my monthly electric bill by about $30-$40 a month
                > just
                > > > by replacing most incadescents with flourescents, getting rid of
                > > > waterbeds with heater, using an electronic thermostat for the
                > A/C,
                > > > using gas instead of electricity for clothes drying.
                > > > Solar electric is expensive at present, as we all are aware,
                > but
                > > > there are little things that people in the cities can do to
                > start
                > > > the
                > > > transition to solar power. Some being: getting rid of
                > incadescent
                > > > lights and use flourescents(these are getting very reasonably
                > > > priced), use solar screens on your windows, getting rid of
                > electric
                > > > driers if you have gas, and use the electronic thermostats for
                > A/C,
                > > > getting rid of phantom loads throughout your house, just to name
                > a
                > > > few. Also, there are small solar powered devices out there that
                > > > don't cost too much, that will give them the feel good aspect of
                > > > using solar, such as solar powered outdoor lights with motion
                > > > sensor,
                > > > solar radios, solar powered attic vent fans, solar powered
                > lamps,
                > > > and
                > > > many, many, more items. These items can be found in magazines
                > just
                > > > about everywhere.
                > > >
                > > > Thanks,
                > > > Jim Syzdek
                > > >
                > > > --- In hreg@egroups.com, "Kevin L. Conlin" <kconlin@s...> wrote:
                > > > > Hi Jonathan, Liked your presentation on solar economics,
                > sorry I
                > > > didn't see it in person in Fredricksburg. We get several calls a
                > > > week
                > > > from people wanting to lower their utility bills and I have to
                > tell
                > > > them that solar doesn't make sense if you are already connected
                > to
                > > > the grid. From their reaction I'm sure this puts people off,
                > but
                > > > it's the truth, and I'm not big on selling people expensive
                > things
                > > > they really don't need. I usually tell them that they should
                > > > conserve
                > > > the energy they are now buying rather than try to generate their
                > > > own,
                > > > but most people are attracted to the quick fix and seem to think
                > > > that
                > > > solar can offer a magic solution to their problems. The
                > intuitive
                > > > friendliness people seem to have towards solar has created a lot
                > of
                > > > opportunities for con artists in the past, and has left a lot of
                > > > disappointed customers in their wake. I wish I had a better
                > answer
                > > > for them, but I have neither the time or patience to get into
                > all
                > > > the economic details of renewables, conservation, social costs,
                > > > environmental impact, etc... This is why I chose to sell to
                > > > industry,
                > > > not consumers. On the other hand, I don't want to discourage
                > them
                > > > completely, so I really don't know the best way to handle these
                > > > inquiries other than to refer them to HREG, TX-SES or TREIA.
                > Any
                > > > thoughts or suggestions? Does anyone in HREG want to talk to
                > these
                > > > people, or have a better answer than I do? Keep up the good
                > work!
                > > >
                > > > regards, Kevin Conlin
                > > > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > > > From: Solarcraft
                > > > > To: Kevin L. Conlin
                > > > > Sent: Monday, October 09, 2000 10:25 AM
                > > > > Subject: Fw: [hreg] Economics of RE Part 2
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > > > From: Jonathan Clemens
                > > > > To: hreg@egroups.com
                > > > > Sent: Saturday, October 07, 2000 1:14 PM
                > > > > Subject: [hreg] Economics of RE Part 2
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > HREG,
                > > > >
                > > > > FYI, Part 2 of 2 attached re: Economics of RE charts
                > provided at
                > > >
                > > > the Roundup. Part 2 contains the appendix items. The original
                > > > powerpoint file was split into two parts in order to comply with
                > the
                > > >
                > > > egroups maximum of 1MB sized messages.
                > > > >
                > > > > Jonathan
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > -------------------------- eGroups Sponsor
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                > > >
                > > >
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                >
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