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Re: [hreg] blown insulation for metal buildings

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  • LaVerne Williams
    For more than a decade now, I have been recommending that my residential clients insulate at the underside of their roofs and not ventilate their attics for a
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 29, 2005
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      For more than a decade now, I have been recommending that my residential clients insulate at the underside of their roofs and not ventilate their attics for a myriad of reasons.  As one of the pioneers who introduced radiant barriers and continuous ridge and soffit venting for attics to the Houston area, insulating at the roof and not venting the attic is a better way to have a healthier, better performing house.  Yes, it costs more initially and most people find the cost hard to swallow, but the results are worth it.  FYI, not only should there be fresh air ducting into the A/C system, but also ducting of combustion air for any gas fired equipment in the attic, like the furnace and water heater.
       
      Regarding composition roofing shingles not lasting as long, it is my opinion that almost everyone associated with any industry, including the composition roofing industry, its manufacturers, suppliers and roofers, will say almost anything to not lose their particular market share.  The composition roofing industry said the same thing would happen to their roofs when radiant barriers were introduced.  The bigger question is, should we even be using petroleum based composition shingles at all????????  Again, when you look at the myraid of problems associated with this type of roofing, it belongs at or near the bottom of the list of preferred roofing products when looking at the long term. 
       
      LaVerne
      _______
      LaVerne A. Williams, AIA, LEED® AP
      architect & building ecologist
      laverne@...
      Environment Associates, Architects & Consultants
      5828 Langfield Road, Houston, TX 77092-1429
      713.528.0000
      866.815.2527 toll free
      www.environmentassoc.com
      30+ Years of Leadership in Healthy, High Performance Green Homes & Remodeling / Green Architecture
      Design Counseling / Consulting / Design / Construction Documents / Construction Administration Services
      Recently recognized by the Citizens League for Environmental Action Now as a "Houston Hero" for the Environment, locally and nationally.
      Recipient of the Hershey Conservation Award from the Houston Audubon Society, the Nation's 2nd largest Audubon Chapter

       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, July 29, 2005 11:14 AM
      Subject: Re: [hreg] blown insulation for metal buildings

      Many EE builders have realized the long-term benefit (savings) of sealing a traditional attic and applying the insulation to the underside of the roof decking, including the roof joists or trusses. The attic floor is not insulated and the entire unventilated attic, and hvac/ducting is kept only slightly higher temperature than the living space. Any eaves or porch roofs etc would need insulation though.
      Home Energy magazine did an article several years ago about this exact process. While HE focuses on northern climate EE issues more often than the south, this process was specific to hot southern climates.
      Jim Duncan
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, July 29, 2005 10:56 AM
      Subject: RE: [hreg] blown insulation for metal buildings

      Foam insulation: I have been told is more expensive than fiber glass batts, but for more info you can go to 
      www.sealection500.com   Demilec is the product.  
        
      Also, an architect in Austin who uses spray foam insulation on residences said recently that for the latest products the off-gassing only occurs for 30 minutes after installation.  I have no verification just his word.
        
      Spraying the insul. On the underside of the rafter can create a sealed attic,
      and this idea is being promoted now.  If you do this you may need to
      consider a fresh air intake for your a/c system.  Also I have come across
      the idea that in our Houston climate a sealed attic does not do well with
      composition roof shingles. The roof will not last as long - but I'm not sure
      about that. 
        
      Insulation is tough - because batt insulation is so cheap.  When you get the
      prices in - will you want to pay - for example - $800 to insulate
      everything with batts, or $3,000 for spray?  This is just a guess - but I've gone down
      this road before, and when you start looking for cost savings in the end, it
      can be hard to go for the more expensive option.  
        
      You may want to go with a high seer a/c system, and more batt insulation. 

       

       

      J. Patrick Malone

       


      From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto: hreg@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Amanda Tullos
      Sent: Friday, July 29, 2005 6:59 AM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [hreg] blown insulation for metal buildings

       

      Check out BioBased, a foam insulation made from soy. At least it wouldn't have the out gassing issue.I haven't used this on a metal building, but it's worth looking into.

      http://www.biobased.net/

       

      Amanda

       


      From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto: hreg@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of John Miggins
      Sent: Friday, July 29, 2005 12:01 AM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [hreg] blown insulation for metal buildings

      I have seen the blown insulation applied on a place I worked before, a raw metal building and it did improve the insulation value.  A couple of observations and these are by no means scientific.

      There is a glue or bonding agent mixed with the insulation that gives off an odor after applied.  one of our workers was affected by this, I could smell it but it did not bother me although it was not pleasant, just not unpleasant.  There was also a place on the garage door that had too much moisture in the mix and it kept coming off.  This may have been just an application problem.  The insualation got all over the floor and contents had to be covered as well for protection.  Perhaps they have perfected this now and it is probably easier when building is new but I would weigh my options well and think of these things and how they will impact your site. 

       

      just my thoughts,  I would think that putting a radiant barrier on the outside of the batts facing the metal would be a good idea to keep heat out as well.  The metal probably does this to some extent.

       

       

       

       

      John Miggins
      Harvest Solar & Wind Power
      "renewable solutions to everyday needs"
      www.harvest-energy.com
      Phone/Fax 918-743-2299
      Cell: 918-521-6223

      ----- Original Message -----

      Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2005 9:31 PM

      Subject: [hreg] blown insulation for metal buildings

       

      I’m looking for information on insulating a metal building after it has been erected. One option is to place a batting between the frame and the skin before the sheet metal is put up. A guy at work mentioned using blown insulation that will stick to the interior metal and give it an excellent heat barrier.  Has anyone used this or seen any information on it? Is it better than batting?

       

      Thanks!!!

       

      Mike

       

       

       

      Mike Schmitt

      www.54lincolncapri.com

       

       

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