Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

EERE Network News -- 02/16/05

Expand Messages
  • EERE Network News by way of Tom Gray
    [] [] A weekly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 16, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      []

      []


      A weekly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)
      <http://www.eere.energy.gov/>Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable
      Energy (EERE). The EERE Network News is also available on the Web at:
      <http://www.eere.energy.gov/news/>www.eere.energy.gov/news/


      February 16, 2005




      News and Events

      * Large Wind Power Plants Slated for North Dakota and Massachusetts
      * Two Companies Get a Boost from Wind Turbine Manufacturing
      * Long Island Aims to Feature a 10-Megawatt Fuel Cell Facility
      * EPA and Four Partners to Build a Hydraulic Hybrid Delivery Van
      * State Energy Collaborative Awards $4 Million to Eight Projects
      * Europeans Join Forces to Develop Organic LEDs


      Site News

      * EERE Launches an RSS News Feed


      Energy Connections

      * Kyoto Protocol Takes Effect Today
      []



      News and Events




      Large Wind Power Plants Slated for North Dakota and Massachusetts

      PPM Energy is proposing to build North Dakota's largest wind plant, a
      150-megawatt facility near Rugby, in the north central part of the state.
      The company submitted a letter of intent to the North Dakota Public Service
      Commission in late January and plans to build the 100-turbine wind project
      by the end of the year. North Dakota Governor John Hoeven expressed support
      for the project, and plans to meet with the company next week. See the
      <http://governor.state.nd.us/media/news-releases/2005/02/050202c.html>governor's
      press release.

      Two smaller wind plants are also under development in northwest
      Massachusetts. Berkshire Wind Power LLC is planning to build the
      15-megawatt Berkshire Project on Brodie Mountain, near the New York border.
      A group of the state's municipal utilities and their power supplier—the
      Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company (MMWEC)—announced in
      December that they would buy power from the project, which Berkshire Wind
      Power plans to build this year. In addition, enXco is planning to build a
      30-megawatt wind project on Bakke Mountain and Crum Hill, in the Hoosac
      Range near the Vermont border. The Hoosac Wind project has passed through
      most of the permitting process, but has yet to earn its final building
      permit. See the MMWEC press release
      (<http://www.mmwec.org/images/2004newsrelease/041206.pdf>PDF 122 KB) and
      the <http://www.hoosacwind.com/ctc6.html>Hoosac Wind Web site.
      <http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/alternate.html>Download Acrobat Reader.

      Here's one place you won't find wind turbines: on the roof of the New York
      Sports and Convention Center (NYSCC), the proposed new home for the New
      York Jets. Though wind turbines were included in a plan released last
      summer, the latest plan eliminates them, and the Jets plan to buy green
      power from upstate New York instead. See the
      <http://nyscc.newyorkjets.com/news.php?id=000000000000125>Jets'
      announcement on the NYSCC Web site.


      Two Companies Get a Boost from Wind Turbine Manufacturing

      []


      A photo of a crane lifting a wind tower.


      A crane prepares to lift a wind tower into place on a farm in Iowa. A
      growing number of companies are benefiting from wind power, producing
      components such as wind towers.
      Credit: Tjaden Farms

      While utilities, wind turbine manufacturers, and wind project developers
      grab most of the wind power headlines, the growth in the wind turbine
      business is providing economic benefits for smaller companies as well. A
      case in point is Aerisyn, LLC, a manufacturer of metal towers for wind
      turbines, which announced in late January that it will build North
      America's first automated wind tower production facility in Chattanooga,
      Tennessee, this summer. The $7-million facility will create 75 new jobs
      initially and as many as 150 new jobs within the next three years. The
      plant will be located in an existing building that has long bays, a
      heavy-duty crane, and easy access to the port, all of which are ideal for
      wind tower construction. Ironically, the building was previously used for
      building nuclear reactor components. See the
      <http://www.chattanooga.gov/mayor/Press_Releases/Aerisyn%20announcement%20205.htm>press
      release from the City of Chattanooga.

      The growth in wind power is also benefiting Missouri-based Zoltec Companies
      Inc., a manufacturer of carbon fibers, which can be used to provide
      strength to wind turbine blades. Zoltec recently signed an agreement with
      Vestas Wind Systems AS of Denmark to provide up to $100 million worth of
      carbon fiber and carbon fiber materials over the next three years. To meet
      the increased demand, the company is starting up five idled production
      lines in Abilene, Texas, and plans to double its worldwide production
      capacity by 2006. See the
      <http://www.zoltek.com/company_information/index.shtml>Zoltec Web site and
      press release
      (<http://www.zoltek.com/company_information/12-16-04VestasPR.doc>MS Word 30
      KB).


      Long Island Aims to Feature a 10-Megawatt Fuel Cell Facility

      The Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) plans to support the construction of
      the world's largest fuel cell power facility at its West Babylon
      substation. On February 1st, LIPA requested proposals for a 10-megawatt
      fuel cell power plant, which it intends to bring online by July 1, 2006.
      The proposed facility would dwarf existing fuel cell plants, which only
      cracked the 1-megawatt barrier in 2000. LIPA proposes to enter into a
      20-year power purchase agreement with the winning bidders, who will own and
      operate the facility. Proposals are due by April 25th. See the
      <http://www.lipower.org/newscenter/pr/2005/feb1.fuelcell.html>LIPA press
      release.

      Long Island already hosts the current record-holder for fuel-cell
      installations, a 1.4-megawatt facility at one of Verizon's critical
      call-routing centers in Garden City. See the
      <http://www.utcfuelcells.com/utcpower/news/archive/2002-03-20.shtm>March
      2002 press release from UTC Fuel Cells.


      EPA and Four Partners to Build a Hydraulic Hybrid Delivery Van

      The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced last week that it
      will work with four partners to build the world's first full hydraulic
      hybrid delivery vehicle. Hydraulic hybrids work like hybrid electric
      vehicles, except that they use tanks of hydraulic fluids under pressure to
      store mechanical energy, whereas a hybrid electric vehicle stores
      electrical energy in a battery. EPA and its four partners­UPS, Eaton Corp.,
      International Truck and Engine Corporation, and the U.S Army National
      Automotive Center (NAC)­will begin by building a full hydraulic hybrid
      powertrain and an innovative hydraulic hybrid propulsion system integrated
      with the drive axle. A second phase of the project will follow up a year
      later by adding a clean diesel engine. The UPS demonstration vehicle is
      projected to achieve a 60 to 70 percent improvement in fuel economy over
      today's delivery vehicles, while meeting the 2010 EPA standard for nitrous
      oxide emissions from heavy vehicles. The EPA expects a 3-year payback
      period for the added cost of the hydraulic hybrid system. See the
      <http://yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/b1ab9f485b098972852562e7004dc686/371449ddfa7c264285256fa4006c109c!OpenDocument>EPA
      press release and <http://www.epa.gov/otaq/technology/420f05006.htm>online
      fact sheet.

      The plans for the UPS demonstration vehicle are sure to be a hot topic at
      the Clean Heavy-Duty Vehicle Conference 2005, which starts on February 22nd
      in La Quinta, California. Billed as the nation's premier gathering of
      industry, military, and regulatory leaders focused on cleaner and more
      efficient heavy-duty vehicles, the conference is organized by
      WestStart-CALSTART and the NAC, with major support from the Federal Transit
      Administration. See the
      <http://www.calstart.org/aboutus/nl_detail.php?id=77>conference
      announcement from WestStart-CALSTART.


      State Energy Collaborative Awards $4 Million to Eight Projects

      The State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) awarded more than
      $4.3 million to eight projects last week as a result of its Energy
      Efficiency and Fossil Energy Science Solicitation. Five of the eight
      projects relate to energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies,
      including advanced power converters for motor drives and distributed power
      systems; advanced power supplies for motors; membranes for separating
      hydrogen from synthesis gases; improved catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch
      process, which produces synthetic fuels from either gasified biomass or
      gasified coal; and a predictive model to help ethanol plants produce
      high-quality distiller's dried grain with solubles (DDGS), a marketable
      co-product of the fuel production process. The remaining three projects,
      which together received nearly $1.4 million in STAC funding, relate to
      large superalloy castings for industrial gas turbines, methane recovery
      from lignite coal seams, and control technologies for coal plants to
      increase their efficiency and reduce their emissions. See the STAC press
      release (<http://www.stacenergy.org/news/2005_02_07.pdf>PDF 19 KB).
      <http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/alternate.html>Download Acrobat Reader.

      While STAC allows states, territories, and DOE to collaborate on energy
      projects, states continue to pursue significant energy-related projects on
      their own. The Connecticut Clean Energy Fund (CCEF), for instance, recently
      issued a request for proposals for its
      "<http://www.ctcleanenergy.com/investment/Project100.html>Project 100," an
      initiative to help develop renewable energy projects in the state. CCEF
      also called for applications to its
      <http://www.ctcleanenergy.com/investment/Pre-DevelopmentProgram.html>Renewable
      Energy Pre-Development Program, which provides up to $500,000 per project
      to help develop renewable energy projects. Finally, CCEF announced that it
      has an additional $9 million available for its Commercial, Industrial, and
      Institutional Solar Photovoltaic Program
      (<http://www.ctcleanenergy.com/documents/CIIPVRFP91504V2.pdf>PDF 212 KB),
      which provides a $5-per-watt subsidy for solar power systems. See the CCEF
      press releases on <http://www.ctcleanenergy.com/news/75.php>Project 100,
      the <http://www.ctcleanenergy.com/news/76.php>Pre-Development Program, and
      the <http://www.ctcleanenergy.com/news/77.php>solar power subsidies.

      Other active states include Pennsylvania, which awarded more than $1
      million in Alternative Fuel Incentive Grants on Monday, and Wisconsin,
      which is offering zero-interest loans and increased cash-back rewards for
      renewable energy systems through its Focus on Energy initiative. See the
      press releases from the
      <http://www.dep.state.pa.us/newsreleases/default.asp?ID=3284>Pennsylvania
      Department of Environmental Protection and Wisconsin's Focus on Energy
      initiative
      (<http://www.focusonenergy.com/data/common/dmsFiles/K_MK_MKPR_PR_1218784857.pdf>PDF
      121 KB).


      Europeans Join Forces to Develop Organic LEDs

      []


      A photo of a hand holding a small square device, with electrode


      White-light OLEDs are flat sheets of material that glow white when a
      voltage is applied to them.
      Credit: Philips

      More than 20 of Europe's leading companies and research establishments in
      the fields of lighting applications and organic electronics and materials
      announced on February 1st that they have formed an integrated research and
      development project to advance organic light emitting diode (OLED)
      technologies. Unlike the LEDs that are currently found in many consumer
      electronics, OLEDs use organic molecules that can be spread out over a
      large surface, causing the entire surface to emit light. The project's goal
      is to demonstrate bright, white OLED light tiles­with a long lifetime and
      high energy efficiency­for use in general lighting applications by 2008.
      The project is called "OLLA," which is an extreme abbreviation of "high
      brightness Organic Light emitting diodes for information communication
      technologies and Lighting Applications." See the
      <http://www.extra.research.philips.com/euprojects/olla/>OLLA Web site and
      press release
      (<http://www.extra.research.philips.com/euprojects/olla/public/press/release/pressrelease_ollaproject.pdf>PDF
      114 KB). <http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/alternate.html>Download
      Acrobat Reader.

      According to ABI Research, OLEDs are already showing up in the dashboard
      displays of some cars, as well as cell phones, digital cameras, and car
      radios. To help OLEDs find wider use, Universal Display Corporation is
      currently working with DOE to develop an OLED-based "smart window" that can
      switch between a transparent window and a source of white light. The
      company is also developing infrared-emitting OLED displays for use by
      military personnel wearing night vision equipment, and is exploring the use
      of ink-jet printers to produce OLED panels. See the press releases from
      <http://www.abiresearch.com/abiprdisplay2.jsp?pressid=399>ABI Research and
      <http://www.universaldisplay.com/newsroom.htm>Universal Display.

      Traditional LEDs continue to gain ground as well. Carmanah Technologies
      Corporation continues to rack up sales for its solar-powered LED products,
      with applications in aviation lights, illuminated traffic signs, and
      solar-powered warning flashers. In early February, the company received a
      $615,000 order from the U.S. Marine Corps to supply solar-powered LED
      airfield lights for the Marine Corps' second-largest airbase in the Middle
      East. See the
      <http://www.carmanah.com/content/investors/news_releases/index.asp>Carmanah
      press releases.
      []



      Site News




      <http://www.eere.energy.gov/news/rss.cfm>EERE Launches an RSS News Feed

      News from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
      (EERE)­including the weekly "EERE Network News" as well as up-to-date news
      on EERE-related press releases from DOE­is now available via an RSS feed.
      RSS, or Really Simple Syndication, is an easy way for Web site owners to
      post the news onto their site, using such scripting languages as
      JavaScript, Perl, and PHP. Newshounds can also use an RSS reader to track
      EERE news automatically. For more information on RSS, see our
      "<http://www.eere.energy.gov/news/rss.cfm>What is RSS?" page, and if you
      already have an RSS reader, you can go directly to our
      <http://www.eere.energy.gov/news/rss/enn.xml>RSS feed.


      Energy Connections




      Kyoto Protocol Takes Effect Today

      Following its ratification by Russia in late 2004, the Kyoto Protocol
      enters into force today, causing its greenhouse gas emission targets to
      become binding legal commitments for those industrialized countries that
      have ratified it. The Kyoto Protocol also puts several market-based
      mechanisms in action, including international greenhouse gas emissions
      trading and the Clean Development Mechanism, which credits participating
      countries for encouraging clean development in developing countries. The
      Kyoto Protocol sets emission targets for industrialized countries for the
      years 2008 to 2012, aiming to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions in
      industrialized countries to at least 5 percent below 1990 levels. See the
      <http://unfccc.int/essential_background/kyoto_protocol/items/2830.php>background
      information about the Kyoto Protocol on the United Nations Framework
      Convention on Climate Change Web site.

      If all industrialized countries participated in the treaty, the Kyoto
      Protocol would apply to about half of global greenhouse gas emissions, but
      since the United States and Australia have not ratified it, the Kyoto
      Protocol's limits apply to 32 percent of global emissions. Although the
      United States is not participating, the Bush Administration has set a
      target to reduce the U.S. greenhouse gas intensity (the amount of
      greenhouse gas produced per unit of gross domestic product) by 18 percent
      by 2012. For more information, see the
      <http://www.pewclimate.org/what_s_being_done/in_the_world/kyoto_enters_into_force/index.cfm>special
      Web site established by the Pew Center on Global Climate Change to mark the
      passing into force of the Kyoto Protocol.

      As the Kyoto Protocol takes effect, researchers at the National Aeronautics
      and Space Administration (NASA) have verified that global temperatures in
      2004 made it the fourth-warmest year on record, falling behind 2002, 2003,
      and the record year of 1998. The researchers also anticipate that 2005
      could set a new record for global temperature. According to NASA, Earth's
      surface now absorbs more of the Sun's energy than gets reflected back to
      space. That extra energy, together with a weak El Niño, is expected to make
      2005 warmer than the years of 2003 and 2004, and perhaps even warmer than
      1998. See the <http://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/news/20050208/>press
      release from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

      This newsletter is funded by DOE's <http://www.eere.energy.gov/>Office of
      Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and is also available on the
      <http://www.eere.energy.gov/news/>EERE news page. You can
      <http://www.eere.energy.gov/news/about.cfm>subscribe to the EERE Network
      News using our simple online form, and you can also
      <http://www.eere.energy.gov/news/changes.cfm>update your email address or
      <http://www.eere.energy.gov/news/unsubscribe.cfm>unsubscribe online.

      If you have questions or comments about this newsletter, please
      <http://www.eere.energy.gov/news/editor.cfm>contact the editor.
      []

      You are currently subscribed as: tomgray@...
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.