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  • Roxanne Boyer
    I just got back from the World Renewable Energy Congress meeting in Denver. Very interesting and exciting event. I m finishing some calculations and then
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 5, 2004
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      I just got back from the World Renewable Energy Congress meeting in Denver.  Very interesting and exciting event.  I'm finishing some calculations and then I'll put out a more detailed report on the HREG e-mail.  Basically, the first wave of renewable energy in the US was Hydro 1920-1960 - making 6% of electricity today.  The hydro power potential is pretty much maxed out.  Biomass as sawmill wastes have always been used and there has been some other waste use acounting for 3% of total energy used in the US.  A second wave of biomass energy will occur 2004 to 2010 raising the total to about 10% of US energy consumed, some as electricity, some as heat and some as fuels; 10% is pretty close to the maximum potential.  Wind power is being installed rapidly 2000 to 2010 to probably make up another 10 to 20% of US electricity before its real potential is reached.  So far, most Renewable energy is generated in large scale, utility type facilities.  Solar PV is unique in that it can be distributed on roof tops.  Solar PV is already taking off in Japan and Germany - both have surpassed US PV production because they have high energy prices and they have serious inititives for Solar power.  Solar PV will probably by convenient for the average residence in 2010 and even economical by 2020.  At that time, the whole electric market will change - very exciting. 
       
      There are three catagories of energy use in the US: electricity, heat and transportation fuel.  The first two can be economically generated largely by renewables within a few decades.  The third, transportation fuel, has no substitue for petroleum - which is our worst dependence.  Even if we use all the available agri land (not being used for food or feed) for biomass and convert it to transportation fuel, it only amounts to about 10% of our current use (I found this disappointing because I thought the potential was larger).  The hydrogen economy (and hydrogen fuel), in my opinion, is far away (after 2050), unless maybe the nation, and world, invest wartime efforts into research and development.  Keep thinking... 
       
      -Chris
       
       
    • Lunce
      Thank you so much Chris!! Lunce
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 6, 2004
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        Thank you so much Chris!!

        Lunce

        Roxanne Boyer wrote:

        > I just got back from the World Renewable Energy Congress meeting in
        > Denver. Very interesting and exciting event. I'm finishing some
        > calculations and then I'll put out a more detailed report on the HREG
        > e-mail. Basically, the first wave of renewable energy in the US was
        > Hydro 1920-1960 - making 6% of electricity today. The hydro
        > power potential is pretty much maxed out. Biomass as sawmill wastes
        > have always been used and there has been some other waste use
        > acounting for 3% of total energy used in the US. A second wave of
        > biomass energy will occur 2004 to 2010 raising the total to about 10%
        > of US energy consumed, some as electricity, some as heat and some as
        > fuels; 10% is pretty close to the maximum potential. Wind power is
        > being installed rapidly 2000 to 2010 to probably make up another 10 to
        > 20% of US electricity before its real potential is reached. So far,
        > most Renewable energy is generated in large scale, utility type
        > facilities. Solar PV is unique in that it can be distributed on roof
        > tops. Solar PV is already taking off in Japan and Germany - both have
        > surpassed US PV production because they have high energy prices and
        > they have serious inititives for Solar power. Solar PV will probably
        > by convenient for the average residence in 2010 and even economical by
        > 2020. At that time, the whole electric market will change - very
        > exciting.
        >
        > There are three catagories of energy use in the US: electricity, heat
        > and transportation fuel. The first two can be economically generated
        > largely by renewables within a few decades. The third, transportation
        > fuel, has no substitue for petroleum - which is our worst dependence.
        > Even if we use all the available agri land (not being used for food or
        > feed) for biomass and convert it to transportation fuel, it only
        > amounts to about 10% of our current use (I found this disappointing
        > because I thought the potential was larger). The hydrogen economy
        > (and hydrogen fuel), in my opinion, is far away (after 2050), unless
        > maybe the nation, and world, invest wartime efforts into research and
        > development. Keep thinking...
        >
        > -Chris
        >
        >
        >
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