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Re: "cool" fuel cells

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  • Randy Scott
    ... through a ceramic electrolyte membrane. The ions won t move until the temperature reaches about 600 degC. At 1000 degC they move real well.
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 30, 2004
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      --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "Roxanne Boyer" <rox1@a...> wrote:
      > Solid oxide fuel cells operate by passing negative oxygen ions
      through a ceramic electrolyte membrane. The ions won't move until
      the temperature reaches about 600 degC. At 1000 degC they move real
      well. Historically, solid oxide fuel cells operated at 800 to 1000
      degC in order to get enough conductivity to work. By making the
      ceramic membrane real thin (which is technology U of H is trying),
      you can operate down to 600 degC, maybe lower, and this is
      considered "cool" (relative to 1000 degC). The challenge is that as
      the membrane gets thinner, it is more likely to form cracks, which
      will ruin the fuel cell. If their bright (and maybe lucky), they may
      figure out some tricks to make it work. Eventually some team is
      going to make a breakthrough if enough people work at it.
      > -Chris
      >

      Thanks - that's the kind of short easy answer I was hoping for.

      RMS
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