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RE: [hreg] Viewpoint on "oil addiction"

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  • Ooi, Han
    Thanks for letting me know where you got your components from. I went to the web site of Selectria Corp and I found their components very interesting. I may
    Message 1 of 10 , May 24 1:00 PM
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      Thanks for letting me know where you got your components from.  I went to the web site of Selectria Corp and I found their components very interesting.  I may buy some of them for other unrelated projects.
       
      One idea I've been pondering is putting solar cells on my hybrid and using the energy to recharge my battery pack.  My hybrid always take a hit in fuel efficiency when the battery pack becomes discharged so perhaps a solar cell mod would make that less likely to happen.  Thus, I can boost the car's fuel efficiency by keeping the battery charged at all times with solar.
       
      Any ideas where I could buy such components?
       
      Han
      -----Original Message-----
      From: HARRISON, HEATHER L. (JSC-ZR) (MEI) [mailto:heather.l.harrison1@...]
      Sent: Monday, May 24, 2004 12:48 PM
      To: 'hreg@yahoogroups.com'
      Subject: RE: [hreg] Viewpoint on "oil addiction"

      OK, fair question.  No, I had not taken those into account.  Here's what the manufacturer of my car (Solectria Corporation) had to say about charging and converting efficiency:

      If you are asking about the efficiency of the charger by it self it is about 96-97% . (heat loss from 220VAC to 156VDC)  The battery is nearly the same, about 95% (again heat loss is the major efficiency loss). 

      So no less than 91% efficiency altogether.

      I don't know why there is a discrepancy between your efficiencies and mine. 

      My advise would be that someone who is ambitious enough to build his or her own electric car do the research on chargers and batteries first.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Ooi, Han [mailto:Han.Ooi@...]
      Sent: Monday, May 24, 2004 10:55 AM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [hreg] Viewpoint on "oil addiction"

      Forgive me for asking further,
          But doesn't you calculation fail to take into account battery charging efficiency and power converter efficiency?  I believe the efficiency for charging batteries is only 30-40% at best.  So if we were to factor in the efficiency from the charging of your electric car battery at 40%, we would get $23/40% or $57.50.
       
          That would be the same (or even a little more expensive) operating cost as my hybrid.
       
      Han
      -----Original Message-----
      From: HARRISON, HEATHER L. (JSC-ZR) (MEI) [mailto:heather.l.harrison1@...]
      Sent: Monday, May 24, 2004 10:39 AM
      To: 'hreg@yahoogroups.com'
      Subject: RE: [hreg] Viewpoint on "oil addiction"

      What Green Mountain Energy is doing is taking the amount of pollutants you are saving from burning coal and measuring that in an equivalent amount of pollutants from car emissions - not a really straight forward conversion, and not valid for estimating miles for power.
       
      Here's the correct conversion for estimating the cost of driving an electric car:
      My car is a 156V system, and takes about 40 Amp-hours to go about 30 miles (with a/c, better without).  That's 6240 Watt-hours, or 6.24 kWh for 30 miles.  With GME's current rate of $0.1116/kWh, that makes about 70 cents for 30 miles.  That means about $23 for 1000 miles.
       
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Ooi, Han [mailto:Han.Ooi@...]
      Sent: Monday, May 24, 2004 8:51 AM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [hreg] Viewpoint on "oil addiction"

      I don't think charging an electric vehicle from the grid is a very cost effective thing to do.
       
      I looked at the back of my last month's Green Mountain energy bill and I paid $60 to save an effective 560 miles driven.  Based on this rate, it is much more cost effective to drive a hybrid.  On my most recent hybrid fillup (Civic Hybrid), I paid $22 for a full tank which would get me 450 miles.  So for $60, I can go over a thousand miles with a hybrid.
       
      Han
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Roxanne Boyer [mailto:rox1@...]
      Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2004 8:46 PM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [hreg] Viewpoint on "oil addiction"

      It will be interesting to see how oil using habits in the US will change as the price of fuel goes up.  I've been working on building an electric vehicle in which to do my short drive to work and local shopping.  These prices are encouraging me to move a little quicker.  Since I buy Electricity from Green Mountain, I will be driving on renewable energy.
      -Chris
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2004 7:54 AM
      Subject: [hreg] Viewpoint on "oil addiction"

      http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/editorial/outlook/2580957

      Houston Chronicle, May 19, 2004, 10:34PM

      VIEWPOINTS
      Solutions to gasoline bite
      Change the policies

      I heartily support David Langworthy's May 17 Sounding Board article, "Needed: exit strategy from oil addiction," that called for a "gradual, rational withdrawal from oil dependence," but it must be noted that transportation policies dealing with future growth can also have a huge impact on oil consumption.

      The slow, steady commitment we've had to the interstate highway system might reasonably be understood to be the commitment we need to achieve independence. But increased fuel consumption, perpetuated by ever-larger highway projects, will only increase our vulnerability to the "nettles of Mideast politics."

      A dark cloud looming over Houston's bright future at this time is the Houston-Galveston Area Council's 2025 Regional Transportation Plan. This $77-billion plan threatens to worsen our dependence on oil by the construction of 12,900 new highway lane miles and increasing vehicle miles traveled by 75 percent over the next 20 years. Vehicle-miles-traveled growth outpacing population growth is an undesirable -- but not surprising -- consequence of state and federal policies that dole out transportation dollars to regions according to the amount of fuel those regions consume.

      Unfortunately, those who create our regional transportation plans fully accept that the best transportation investment is one that will increase how much we drive and how much fuel we consume every day! A real exit strategy would include a plan that utilizes rational transportation and land use planning methods to decrease the number of miles residents must drive each day.

      Such a plan would include advanced transit options offering safer, faster and more cost-effective trips to places people need to go. As voting taxpayers, we should demand nothing less from our elected officials and transportation planners.
      Polly Ledvina, Houston








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