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RE:[Mike ewert] An analysis of the future of hydrogen fuel

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  • Mike Johnston
    Hi Mike, Remember that numbers can be adjusted to express whatever point you want to make (ref; ENRON s books). Electrolysis technologies will continue to
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 2, 2004
      Hi Mike,
         Remember that numbers can be "adjusted" to express whatever point you want to make (ref; ENRON's books). Electrolysis technologies will continue to evolve and improve. As far as the Platinum goes there is plenty of wiggle room there. Consider that there is plenty of Pt to coat several inert Nickel electrodes in the catalytic converter of every automobile on the road today. With H2 fuel there are no emissions and so they can all be recycled into electrodes.
         As an aside, consider that most of the Pt mined today goes to the oil industry for use in the catalytic cracking of petroleum hydrocarbons.
      MJ
       
      Message: 1
         Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2004 21:08:08 -0600
         From: "Mike Ewert" <mewert@...>
      Subject: RE: An analysis of the future of hydrogen fuel
       
      I'm curious what Chris or others think about this statement on the website:
      "Given the existing electrolysis technologies and platinum mining
      technologies, the platinum catalyst has to continue to work in the fuel cell
      without being damaged for almost three decades to get positive energy
      payback from the fuel cell"
       
      Can the platinum be recycled from fuel cells?
       
      The same arguments have been used against renewable energy devices.  If I
      recall correctly, the most reliable calculations I've seen are:
      PV ~ 1 year or a little more energy payback (used to be a lot higher)
      large wind - a few months
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