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Re: Coal, Wyatt and Texas power

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  • David Funk
    ... switched ... plant ... wrong ... no problem! mercy is granted! It s called pulverized coal firing and can be adapted to natural gas boilers with
    Message 1 of 25 , Jul 7, 2003
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      --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "mark r. johnson" <mrj53@m...> wrote:
      > > Older folks will remember
      > > the details but anyway SA and some other south Texas towns
      switched
      > over from
      > > gas to coal and have been using it ever since.
      >
      > I guess by now I am one of the older folks, and this is specialized
      > knowledge that we *don't* all remember. Actually, I want to express
      > real skepticism that Wyatt was that influential in the building of
      > lignite/coal plants in Texas. One cannot "convert" a natural gas
      plant
      > to coal, as coal requires some elaborate and expensive machinery to
      > handle it. I try to stay aware of electric generating technology and
      > have never heard of a gas plant being converted to coal. If I am
      wrong
      > then please have mercy and point me to some education.
      >



      <GRIN> no problem! mercy is granted!

      It's called "pulverized coal firing" and can be adapted to natural
      gas boilers with 'minimal' modifications to the boiler itself.

      However, there is extensive, elaborate and expensive machinery
      required to stock pile the coal, move it to the pulverizer, then
      inject the very fine, finer than talcum powder, powdered coal, almost
      like an atomized mist, into the burner. Advantages are complete
      combustion, minimal to no ash. Sulfur in the flue gases can be
      treated by passing the flue gases through limestone creating gypsum
      and carbon dioxide. We know gypsum as sheetrock.


      David, CEO
      The GREAT Grand Funk Northern
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