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The San Francisco Solar Story

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  • ChasMauch@aol.com
    Dear HREGers, I knew that San Francisco had some kind of solar proposition on their ballot last November but never heard the details or how it came out. Turns
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 29, 2002
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      Dear HREGers,

      I knew that San Francisco had some kind of solar proposition on their ballot last November but never heard the details or how it came out. Turns out that it passed and it is a very interesting project which I think we should investigate seriously for Houston or for the entire state.
      You can find the details at www.votesolar.org. There are several buttons you can select as listed below. I have reproduced below the one called "The San Francisco Story" which I think is very interesting, but the others give more details and are also worth reading. I asked to be put on their list ("Contact Us") below. Would appreciate any thoughts anyone might have on this.
      Charlie Mauch












       



      THE SAN FRANCISCO STORYOn November 6, 2001, San Francisco voters overwhelmingly approved a landmark $100 million bond initiative that pays for solar panels, energy efficiency and wind turbines for public facilities. The measure pays for itself entirely from energy savings at no cost to taxpayers. With this model, San Francisco pioneered a path for funding the nation's transition to renewable energy.The mechanics are simple. The bond pays for solar panels, wind turbines and energy efficiency measures for public buildings. The money that would have gone to buy electricity from power plants instead goes to pay down the bond. The campaign for the solar revenue bond happened because San Francisco residents, like many other Californians, were plagued by blackouts, skyrocketing prices and dirty neighborhood power plants. Large-scale solar power represents an important way for people to take greater control over their future by making their own affordable, reliable, and clean energy.The effort to pass the measure became a consensus campaign. The measure earned the endorsement of organizations spanning the political spectrum from the Chamber of Commerce to the Sierra Club and almost every elected leader representing San Francisco from City Hall to Capitol Hill. The measure, which moved from a mere idea to approved legislation in less than 10 months, passed by 73%. Implementation of the bond will be handled by the city's Public Utilities Commission and will be phased in over four years.The San Francisco revenue bond model has already attracted the attention of cities around the country because of its enormous popularity with voters and its obvious fiscal advantages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .VoteSolar Home | Contact Us | Links
      The San Francisco Story
      | Why Solar? | About Revenue Bonds

      Tools to Help You

      | Press




      The effort to put solar panels on government buildings in San Francisco was supported almost universally.
    • C. Terry Ross
      This would be great for Harris County - especially if they included multifamily structures. I am trying to utilize water-source heat pumps for a 4 story, 100
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 29, 2002
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        This would be great for Harris County – especially if they included multifamily structures.  I am trying to utilize water-source heat pumps for a 4 story, 100 unit apt complex and would like to include solar and/or wind if the economies were there.

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: ChasMauch@... [mailto:ChasMauch@...]
        Sent: Monday, April 29, 2002 2:06 PM
        To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [hreg] The San Francisco Solar Story

         

        Dear HREGers,

        I knew that
        San Francisco had some kind of solar proposition on their ballot last November but never heard the details or how it came out. Turns out that it passed and it is a very interesting project which I think we should investigate seriously for Houston or for the entire state.
        You can find the details at www.votesolar.org. There are several buttons you can select as listed below. I have reproduced below the one called "The
        San Francisco Story" which I think is very interesting, but the others give more details and are also worth reading. I asked to be put on their list ("Contact Us") below. Would appreciate any thoughts anyone might have on this.
        Charlie Mauch













         



         

        THE SAN FRANCISCO STORYOn November 6, 2001, San Francisco voters overwhelmingly approved a landmark $100 million bond initiative that pays for solar panels, energy efficiency and wind turbines for public facilities. The measure pays for itself entirely from energy savings at no cost to taxpayers. With this model, San Francisco pioneered a path for funding the nation's transition to renewable energy.The mechanics are simple. The bond pays for solar panels, wind turbines and energy efficiency measures for public buildings. The money that would have gone to buy electricity from power plants instead goes to pay down the bond. The campaign for the solar revenue bond happened because San Francisco residents, like many other Californians, were plagued by blackouts, skyrocketing prices and dirty neighborhood power plants. Large-scale solar power re! presents an important way for people to take greater control over their future by making their own affordable, reliable, and clean energy.The effort to pass the measure became a consensus campaign. The measure earned the endorsement of organizations spanning the political spectrum from the Chamber of Commerce to the Sierra Club and almost every elected leader representing San Francisco from City Hall to Capitol Hill. The measure, which moved from a mere idea to approved legislation in less than 10 months, passed by 73%. Implementation of the bond will be handled by the city's Public Utilities Commission and will be phased in over four years.The San Francisco revenue bond model has already attracted the attention of cities around the country because of its enormous popularity with voters and its obvious fiscal advantages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .VoteSolar Home | Contact Us | Links
        The San Francisco Story
        | Why Solar? | About Revenue Bonds

        Tools to Help You | Press




        The effort to put solar panels on government buildings in San Francisco was supported almost universally.



        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      • tigger@io.com
        ... I m interested in the details of this system for the apartment complex. One of the issues discussed at yesterday s meeting (thanks, Greg!) was that
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 29, 2002
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          On Mon, 29 Apr 2002, C. Terry Ross wrote:

          > This would be great for Harris County - especially if they included
          > multifamily structures. I am trying to utilize water-source heat pumps
          > for a 4 story, 100 unit apt complex and would like to include solar
          > and/or wind if the economies were there.
          >

          I'm interested in the details of this system for the apartment complex. One
          of the issues discussed at yesterday's meeting (thanks, Greg!) was that
          geothermal units lose efficiency once the ground starts loading up with
          heat. I would guess you'll have to go a lot deeper than the 150' of Greg's
          system to avoid that problem.
        • Robert Johnston
          Charlies, If they didn t use fuzzy math to do this, but picked real payback type projects, this is a great idea. As far as I m concerned, it beats paying for
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 29, 2002
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            Charlies,

             

            If they didn’t use fuzzy math to do this, but picked real payback type projects, this is a great idea.  As far as I’m concerned, it beats paying for baseball stadiums and football stadiums with bond money and leaving sucker tourists, car renters and restaurant diners picking up the tab.

             

            I wonder if they calculated the payback based on last year’s inflated California electricity prices or on more realistic longterm pricing.

             

            Robert Johnston

             

            -----Original Message-----
            From: ChasMauch@... [mailto:ChasMauch@...]
            Sent: Monday, April 29, 2002 2:06 PM
            To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [hreg] The San Francisco Solar Story

             

            Dear HREGers,

            I knew that San Francisco had some kind of solar proposition on their ballot last November but never heard the details or how it came out. Turns out that it passed and it is a very interesting project which I think we should investigate seriously for Houston or for the entire state.
            You can find the details at www.votesolar.org. There are several buttons you can select as listed below. I have reproduced below the one called "The San Francisco Story" which I think is very interesting, but the others give more details and are also worth reading. I asked to be put on their list ("Contact Us") below. Would appreciate any thoughts anyone might have on this.
            Charlie Mauch













             



             

            THE SAN FRANCISCO STORYOn November 6, 2001, San Francisco voters overwhelmingly approved a landmark $100 million bond initiative that pays for solar panels, energy efficiency and wind turbines for public facilities. The measure pays for itself entirely from energy savings at no cost to taxpayers. With this model, San Francisco pioneered a path for funding the nation's transition to renewable energy.The mechanics are simple. The bond pays for solar panels, wind turbines and energy efficiency measures for public buildings. The money that would have gone to buy electricity from power plants instead goes to pay down the bond. The campaign for the solar revenue bond happened because San Francisco residents, like many other Californians, were plagued by blackouts, skyrocketing prices and dirty neighborhood power plants. Large-scale solar power represents an important way for people to take greater control over their future by making their own affordable, reliable, and clean energy.The effort to pass the measure became a consensus campaign. The measure earned the endorsement of organizations spanning the political spectrum from the Chamber of Commerce to the Sierra Club and almost every elected leader representing San Francisco from City Hall to Capitol Hill. The measure, which moved from a mere idea to approved legislation in less than 10 months, passed by 73%. Implementation of the bond will be handled by the city's Public Utilities Commission and will be phased in over four years.The San Francisco revenue bond model has already attracted the attention of cities around the country because of its enormous popularity with voters and its obvious fiscal advantages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .VoteSolar Home | Contact Us | Links
            The San Francisco Story
            | Why Solar? | About Revenue Bonds

            Tools to Help You | Press




            The effort to put solar panels on government buildings in San Francisco was supported almost universally.



            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
          • ChasMauch@aol.com
            Robert, When you click on the Contact Us button you get the name of 3 persons who were instrumental in putting the bond issue together (copied below). I
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 29, 2002
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              Robert,
              When you click on the "Contact Us" button you get the name of 3 persons who were instrumental in putting the bond issue together (copied below). I assume you could contact one of them and get the details of what they did and how fuzzy the numbers might be. I hope someone who is good on economic evaluation will do this and report their conclusions back to the rest of us.
              Charlie
















              CONTACT US Want to talk to someone about how to do this in your
              city?


              David Hochschild, after working on the team that put together the
              solar bond, left his job in the San Francisco Mayor's Office in August 2001 to work on the campaign full time and has now co-founded the Vote Solar Initiative.
              dhochschild@...
              (415) 641-5874

              Adam Browning, a toxics specialist with the Environmental Protection Agency, also worked on the campaign for San Francisco's solar bond and co-founded the Vote Solar Initiative.
              abrowning@... or
              h:(510) 548-3102
              m:(510) 520 0630


              Toby Barlow
              is a creative director for JWT & Tonic, a San Francisco

              advertising and marketing agency, and served as a volunteer for Prop B.
              toby@...Mailing Address:
              The Vote Solar Initiative
              3857 20th Street
              San Francisco, CA
              94114


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              The San Francisco Story
              | Why Solar? | About Revenue Bonds Tools to Help You | Press 






              In some ways, the rest of the world is way ahead of us when it comes to recognizing the value of solar power.Germany is the leading market for solar panels, though it receives only 60% of the annual sunlight of the US.Kenya has electrified 20,000 homes using PVs in the last few years, compared to only 17,000 new homes that were hooked up to the central power grid. In Morocco, solar panels are sold in bazaars and open markets, right alongside carpets and tinware.
            • Kim & Garth Travis
              One ... While my solution would be difficult for a large building, it does work on a small one. My cooling coil is under a garden bed that is watered
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 30, 2002
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                One
                > of the issues discussed at yesterday's meeting (thanks, Greg!) was that
                > geothermal units lose efficiency once the ground starts loading up with
                > heat.

                While my solution would be difficult for a large building, it does work
                on a small one. My cooling coil is under a garden bed that is watered
                everyday. This helps wash the heat away and keeps my place cool. The
                other option is a shaded, deep pond. Just make sure you run your lines
                far enough apart to not heat your cool with the return heat.
                Kim
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