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Ireland to meet Kyoto Protocol

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  • Sean Ryan
    Snippet from a ocean journal I receive: Dublin, Ireland -- According to the BBC, Ireland expects a bit cut in greenhouse gas emissions. The country s
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 15, 2002
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      Snippet from a ocean journal I receive:

      Dublin, Ireland -- According to the BBC, Ireland
      expects a bit cut in greenhouse gas emissions. The
      country's government has approved plans for the
      world's largest offshore electricity-generating wind
      farm, to be built on a sandbank in the Irish Sea south
      of Dublin. When completed, the 200 turbines will
      produce 10% of the country's electricity needs.
      Marine
      Minister Frank Fahey said the 700-million euro
      (USD$630 million) development would have three times
      the generating capacity of all current offshore wind
      farms worldwide. Fahey added that the wind farm would
      do much to help Ireland achieve its targets under the
      Kyoto Protocol on limiting global warming, cutting
      greenhouse gas emissions by 13 million tonnes per
      year.


      The plant on the 27-kilometer-long Arklow sandbank
      will be built by a private Irish company, Eirtricity.
      It will be about 7 kilometers from the shore at its
      nearest point. Arklow Bank runs north-south along the
      coast, with water depths of between 5 and 25 meters.
      Eirtricity officials said they hope to begin
      construction work in the spring, with the first phase
      of the project, generating 60 megawatts, going into
      operation in the autumn.


      One megawatt of wind-generating capacity typically
      will satisfy the electricity needs of 350 households
      in an industrial society, or roughly 1,000 people.
      The plant's capacity will ultimately reach 520
      megawatts. The state will receive up to 1.9 million
      euros ($1.7 million) a year from Eirtricity in rentals
      and royalties.


      A report published last week said that wind-generated
      electricity production jumped by 31% last year, making
      it the most rapidly growing branch of the power
      industry. Since 1985 the use of coal for power
      generation has dropped by 9%, while the use of wind
      has increased by 487%. U.S. experience shows
      it is now also one of the cheapest methods of
      generating electricity, the report says.


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