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Solar farm in San Antonio

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  • dbswann4
    I had the opportunity to visit one of the smaller solar farms in San Antonio on Saturday - only 45 acres. I have attached a video, as seen from the bus tour.
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 13, 2014
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    • 4.7 MB
    I had the opportunity to visit one of the smaller solar farms in San Antonio on Saturday - only 45 acres. I have attached a video, as seen from the bus tour. Let's make this happen in Houston.
  • Alyssa Burgin
    As a native of San Antonio, I m happy to say that San Antonio ranks number 6 in the nation for solar. Hey, the sun gives us all equal opportunities
    Message 2 of 12 , Apr 13, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      As a native of San Antonio, I'm happy to say that San Antonio ranks number 6 in the nation for solar. Hey, the sun gives us all equal opportunities here--Houston needs to step up.
      http://environmenttexas.org/news/txe/new-report-san-antonio-ranks-6th-nation-solar-energy

      Our organization helped bring Lanny Sinkin, director of Solar San Antonio, to Corpus Christi to talk about how their organization was able to put banking plus electrical utility together to make solar affordable for a larger population of residents. Their organization has clearly put solar smack dab in the middle of planning for the future of the utility, as well.

      Lanny's inspirational in this regard.

      Alyssa Burgin


      On Sun, Apr 13, 2014 at 10:52 AM, <william.swann2@...> wrote:
      [Attachment(s) from william.swann2@... included below]

      I had the opportunity to visit one of the smaller solar farms in San Antonio on Saturday - only 45 acres. I have attached a video, as seen from the bus tour. Let's make this happen in Houston.




      --
      Alyssa Burgin
      Executive Director
      Texas Drought Project
      www.texasdroughtproject.org/home.html

      16306 Buena Tierra
      San Antonio, Texas 78232
      210-381-4021
      "When the well is dry, we know the value of water."--Benjamin Franklin
    • Tyra Rankin
      Bill; Spectacular! We could make this happen in Houston. San Antonio, as part or its 400m RFQ required local manufacturing. I would love to tour San
      Message 3 of 12 , Apr 13, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        Bill;

        Spectacular!  We could make this happen in Houston.  San Antonio, as part or its 400m RFQ required local manufacturing. 

        I would love to tour San Antonio's solar installation and manufacturing.  Thank you so much for sharing this.

        Warmly,

        Tyra

        Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


        william.swann2@... wrote:

         

        I had the opportunity to visit one of the smaller solar farms in San Antonio on Saturday - only 45 acres. I have attached a video, as seen from the bus tour. Let's make this happen in Houston.

      • Violeta Archer
        Folks, No worries. It is happening in Houston already. The City of Houston has announced a call for bids for a renewable energy plant. This is public
        Message 4 of 12 , Apr 14, 2014
        • 0 Attachment
          Folks,

          No worries. It is happening in Houston already. The City of Houston has announced a call for bids for a renewable energy plant. This is public information available on their site. They are envisioning a renewable energy plant composed of solar energy, wind energy AND combined heat power (CHP). Like San Antonio, Houston's RFP requires local manufacturing.


          There are renewable energy supporters within city government (the mayor is one of them). And trust me. . .they have been doing due diligence for a couple of years now and researching domestic and international municipalities that have set the example. It's just a matter of time. We all know that Houston is a different animal. As a transplant from Austin, it's taken me a while to accept Houston's pace.

          Next, an organized field trip to the solar farm in San Antonio is being planned later this year (either as a convoy in individual vehicles or on a bus - the latter requires a bus rental, insurance, arrangements with our sister group in San Antonio, etc). Please keep your eyes peeled for announcements here and on the HREG events page.

          Sit tight, and enjoy the ride!

          Violeta Archer
          HREG President



          On Apr 14, 2014, at 2:22 AM, hreg@yahoogroups.com wrote:

          There are 3 messages in this issue.

          Topics in this digest:

          1a. Solar farm in San Antonio    
             From:  dbswann4
          1b. Re: Solar farm in San Antonio [1 Attachment]    
             From: Alyssa Burgin
          1c. Re: Solar farm in San Antonio [1 Attachment]    
             From: Tyra Rankin


          Messages
          ________________________________________________________________________
          1a. Solar farm in San Antonio
             Posted by:  william.swann2@... dbswann4
             Date: Sun Apr 13, 2014 8:52 am ((PDT))

          I had the opportunity to visit one of the smaller solar farms in San Antonio on Saturday - only 45 acres. I have attached a video, as seen from the bus tour. Let's make this happen in Houston.


          1 of 1 File(s) https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/hreg/attachments/1488830315

          Alamo 2.MOV

          Messages in this topic (3)
          ________________________________________________________________________
          1b. Re: Solar farm in San Antonio [1 Attachment]
             Posted by: "Alyssa Burgin" aburgin4peace@... aburgin4peace
             Date: Sun Apr 13, 2014 9:07 am ((PDT))

          As a native of San Antonio, I'm happy to say that San Antonio ranks number
          6 in the nation for solar. Hey, the sun gives us all equal opportunities
          here--Houston needs to step up.
          http://environmenttexas.org/news/txe/new-report-san-antonio-ranks-6th-nation-solar-energy

          Our organization helped bring Lanny Sinkin, director of Solar San Antonio,
          to Corpus Christi to talk about how their organization was able to put
          banking plus electrical utility together to make solar affordable for a
          larger population of residents. Their organization has clearly put solar
          smack dab in the middle of planning for the future of the utility, as well.

          Lanny's inspirational in this regard.

          Alyssa Burgin


          On Sun, Apr 13, 2014 at 10:52 AM, <william.swann2@...> wrote:

          [Attachment(s) <#1455bca2df6fc563_TopText> from william.swann2@... below]

          I had the opportunity to visit one of the smaller solar farms in San
          Antonio on Saturday - only 45 acres. I have attached a video, as seen from
          the bus tour. Let's make this happen in Houston.






          --



          *Alyssa BurginExecutive DirectorTexas Drought Project*

          *www.texasdroughtproject.org/home.html
          <http://www.texasdroughtproject.org/home.html>*




          *16306 Buena TierraSan Antonio, Texas 78232210-381-4021*

          *"When the well is dry, we know the value of water."--Benjamin Franklin*




          Messages in this topic (3)
          ________________________________________________________________________
          1c. Re: Solar farm in San Antonio [1 Attachment]
             Posted by: "Tyra Rankin" tyra@... tyra.rankin
             Date: Sun Apr 13, 2014 9:16 am ((PDT))

          Bill;

          Spectacular!  We could make this happen in Houston.  San Antonio, as part or its 400m RFQ required local manufacturing.  

          I would love to tour San Antonio's solar installation and manufacturing.  Thank you so much for sharing this.

          Warmly,

          Tyra

          Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

          william.swann2@... wrote:

           

          [Attachment(s) from william.swann2@... included below]

          I had the opportunity to visit one of the smaller solar farms in San Antonio on Saturday - only 45 acres. I have attached a video, as seen from the bus tour. Let's make this happen in Houston.



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          Messages in this topic (3)





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        • jay.ring@ymail.com
          It s a beautiful system. I really like the design of the tracking mounts. I don t want to sound like a downer but I think projects such as these are better
          Message 5 of 12 , Apr 14, 2014
          • 0 Attachment
            It's a beautiful system.  I really like the design of the tracking mounts.

            I don't want to sound like a downer but I think projects such as these are better sited in San Antonio than in Houston.  Hear me out.

            San Antonio is not great agricultural land, primarily because fresh water is a scarce resource.  Therefore, covering up the land with PV has a very minor ecological cost and may even be a net positive by decreasing evaporation (thus increasing soil moisture content).

            The same installation in Houston has a much higher cost because it the land is much more ecologically and agriculturally productive.

            Another way of saying it is that there aren't a lot of great uses for the land in SA but there are a lot of great uses for it in Houston.

            One of the reasons I am such a fan of rooftop solar (in Houston) is because we can add it with zero additional ecological cost.  Building a house takes the land it sits on out of the ecological zone.

            A neighborhood with a PV farm next to it is much larger and more ecologically costly than it needs to be.  You can put the PV farm on top of the houses, as rooftop solar, and achieve the same result at smaller ecological cost.  

            So this is what I think should be done, as much as possible.
          • Alyssa Burgin
            I don t know when the last time was that you were in San Antonio, but saying there are not a lot of great uses for the land in San Antonio ignores completely
            Message 6 of 12 , Apr 14, 2014
            • 0 Attachment
              I don't know when the last time was that you were in San Antonio, but saying there are not a lot of great uses for the land in San Antonio ignores completely what is happening in San Antonio. No, the areas in Bexar County itself are not competitively agricultural--but not because of lack of water, that's never stopped anyone, unfortunately. We're not an agricultural society over here, we're industrialized and urban. The "cost" for development of PV solar is giving up land that would ordinarily be developed by either commercial or residential developers. And with development reaching a fever pitch in San Antonio and Bexar County, the land cost for solar farms is high, in more ways than one.

              The choice is not between developing land for farming and developing land for solar.

              The choice is between developing land into profitable subdivisions and business development--and solar farms. The huge solar farm across from Baker Hughes Corporate office for the Eagle Ford Shale is a prime example. The land all around there is being purchased and developed by companies which have interests further south--in the shale, and is thus very valuable and very pricey land--but instead, it's a solar farm.

              As to rooftop solar, we have a very high percentage of that in San Antonio, as well. It's not an either-or proposition, and it should never be proposed as such.


              Alyssa Burgin


              On Mon, Apr 14, 2014 at 9:06 AM, <public@...> wrote:


              It's a beautiful system.  I really like the design of the tracking mounts.

              I don't want to sound like a downer but I think projects such as these are better sited in San Antonio than in Houston.  Hear me out.

              San Antonio is not great agricultural land, primarily because fresh water is a scarce resource.  Therefore, covering up the land with PV has a very minor ecological cost and may even be a net positive by decreasing evaporation (thus increasing soil moisture content).

              The same installation in Houston has a much higher cost because it the land is much more ecologically and agriculturally productive.

              Another way of saying it is that there aren't a lot of great uses for the land in SA but there are a lot of great uses for it in Houston.

              One of the reasons I am such a fan of rooftop solar (in Houston) is because we can add it with zero additional ecological cost.  Building a house takes the land it sits on out of the ecological zone.

              A neighborhood with a PV farm next to it is much larger and more ecologically costly than it needs to be.  You can put the PV farm on top of the houses, as rooftop solar, and achieve the same result at smaller ecological cost.  

              So this is what I think should be done, as much as possible.




              --
              Alyssa Burgin
              Executive Director
              Texas Drought Project
              www.texasdroughtproject.org/home.html

              16306 Buena Tierra
              San Antonio, Texas 78232
              210-381-4021
              "When the well is dry, we know the value of water."--Benjamin Franklin
            • jay.ring@ymail.com
              No, the areas in Bexar County itself are not competitively agricultural Which is why solar farms make a lot more sense in SA than they do in Houston. The
              Message 7 of 12 , Apr 14, 2014
              • 0 Attachment
                "No, the areas in Bexar County itself are not competitively agricultural"

                Which is why solar farms make a lot more sense in SA than they do in Houston.

                "The choice is not between developing land for farming and developing land for solar."

                In Houston, that is the choice.  

                Which is why solar farms make more sense in SA than they do in Houston.

                Maybe you missed my point, which was: projects such as these are better sited in San Antonio than in Houston.

                I did not say they don't make sense in SA.  I said they make more sense in SA than they do in Houston.


                ---In hreg@yahoogroups.com, <aburgin4peace@...> wrote :

                I don't know when the last time was that you were in San Antonio, but saying there are not a lot of great uses for the land in San Antonio ignores completely what is happening in San Antonio. No, the areas in Bexar County itself are not competitively agricultural--but not because of lack of water, that's never stopped anyone, unfortunately. We're not an agricultural society over here, we're industrialized and urban. The "cost" for development of PV solar is giving up land that would ordinarily be developed by either commercial or residential developers. And with development reaching a fever pitch in San Antonio and Bexar County, the land cost for solar farms is high, in more ways than one.

                The choice is not between developing land for farming and developing land for solar.

                The choice is between developing land into profitable subdivisions and business development--and solar farms. The huge solar farm across from Baker Hughes Corporate office for the Eagle Ford Shale is a prime example. The land all around there is being purchased and developed by companies which have interests further south--in the shale, and is thus very valuable and very pricey land--but instead, it's a solar farm.

                As to rooftop solar, we have a very high percentage of that in San Antonio, as well. It's not an either-or proposition, and it should never be proposed as such.


                Alyssa Burgin


                On Mon, Apr 14, 2014 at 9:06 AM, <public@...> wrote:


                It's a beautiful system.  I really like the design of the tracking mounts.

                I don't want to sound like a downer but I think projects such as these are better sited in San Antonio than in Houston.  Hear me out.

                San Antonio is not great agricultural land, primarily because fresh water is a scarce resource.  Therefore, covering up the land with PV has a very minor ecological cost and may even be a net positive by decreasing evaporation (thus increasing soil moisture content).

                The same installation in Houston has a much higher cost because it the land is much more ecologically and agriculturally productive.

                Another way of saying it is that there aren't a lot of great uses for the land in SA but there are a lot of great uses for it in Houston.

                One of the reasons I am such a fan of rooftop solar (in Houston) is because we can add it with zero additional ecological cost.  Building a house takes the land it sits on out of the ecological zone.

                A neighborhood with a PV farm next to it is much larger and more ecologically costly than it needs to be.  You can put the PV farm on top of the houses, as rooftop solar, and achieve the same result at smaller ecological cost.  

                So this is what I think should be done, as much as possible.




                --
                Alyssa Burgin
                Executive Director
                Texas Drought Project
                www.texasdroughtproject.org/home.html

                16306 Buena Tierra
                San Antonio, Texas 78232
                210-381-4021
                "When the well is dry, we know the value of water."--Benjamin Franklin
              • J P Malone
                Agreed. Masdar City is located in United Arab Emirates has far less arid soil than Bexar County yet is utilizing a huge portion of its resources for renewable
                Message 8 of 12 , Apr 14, 2014
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                  Agreed.  Masdar City is located in United Arab Emirates has far less arid soil than Bexar County yet is utilizing a huge portion of its resources for renewable energy of all kinds.

                   

                  From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Alyssa Burgin
                  Sent: Monday, April 14, 2014 9:20 AM
                  To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: Solar farm in San Antonio

                   

                   

                  I don't know when the last time was that you were in San Antonio, but saying there are not a lot of great uses for the land in San Antonio ignores completely what is happening in San Antonio. No, the areas in Bexar County itself are not competitively agricultural--but not because of lack of water, that's never stopped anyone, unfortunately. We're not an agricultural society over here, we're industrialized and urban. The "cost" for development of PV solar is giving up land that would ordinarily be developed by either commercial or residential developers. And with development reaching a fever pitch in San Antonio and Bexar County, the land cost for solar farms is high, in more ways than one.

                  The choice is not between developing land for farming and developing land for solar.

                  The choice is between developing land into profitable subdivisions and business development--and solar farms. The huge solar farm across from Baker Hughes Corporate office for the Eagle Ford Shale is a prime example. The land all around there is being purchased and developed by companies which have interests further south--in the shale, and is thus very valuable and very pricey land--but instead, it's a solar farm.

                  As to rooftop solar, we have a very high percentage of that in San Antonio, as well. It's not an either-or proposition, and it should never be proposed as such.

                   

                  Alyssa Burgin

                   

                  On Mon, Apr 14, 2014 at 9:06 AM, <public@...> wrote:



                  It's a beautiful system.  I really like the design of the tracking mounts.

                  I don't want to sound like a downer but I think projects such as these are better sited in San Antonio than in Houston.  Hear me out.

                  San Antonio is not great agricultural land, primarily because fresh water is a scarce resource.  Therefore, covering up the land with PV has a very minor ecological cost and may even be a net positive by decreasing evaporation (thus increasing soil moisture content).

                  The same installation in Houston has a much higher cost because it the land is much more ecologically and agriculturally productive.

                  Another way of saying it is that there aren't a lot of great uses for the land in SA but there are a lot of great uses for it in Houston.

                  One of the reasons I am such a fan of rooftop solar (in Houston) is because we can add it with zero additional ecological cost.  Building a house takes the land it sits on out of the ecological zone.

                  A neighborhood with a PV farm next to it is much larger and more ecologically costly than it needs to be.  You can put the PV farm on top of the houses, as rooftop solar, and achieve the same result at smaller ecological cost.  

                  So this is what I think should be done, as much as possible.

                   




                  --

                  Alyssa Burgin
                  Executive Director
                  Texas Drought Project

                  www.texasdroughtproject.org/home.html

                   

                  16306 Buena Tierra
                  San Antonio, Texas 78232
                  210-381-4021

                  "When the well is dry, we know the value of water."--Benjamin Franklin

                • William Swann
                  The solar farm site, in San Antonio, was chosen because of it s proximity to a water treatment plant. ie, the land had been compromised for residential
                  Message 9 of 12 , Apr 14, 2014
                  • 0 Attachment
                       The solar farm site, in San Antonio, was chosen because of it's proximity to a water treatment plant. ie, the land had been compromised for residential construction. The city of Houston is not in the power business, but can offer up acreage for distributed generation. Part of the development cost, is the cost of the land.
                       2 factors that make Houston more challenging than San Antonio are 1.) Houston receives 14 % less solar insolation on an annual basis, and 2.) Houston is in a higher speed wind zone - ie more steel to anchor the array.
                       I find it interesting that San Antonio choose 2 axis trackers. The economics supporting this is because of the high cost of energy when the peaking generator sets are fired up. The output of trackers can be optimized to peak when the electrical load peaks. This is an interesting topic. Does anyone have experience with ERCOT and the cost of energy?


                    On Mon, Apr 14, 2014 at 9:40 AM, <public@...> wrote:
                     

                    "No, the areas in Bexar County itself are not competitively agricultural"

                    Which is why solar farms make a lot more sense in SA than they do in Houston.


                    "The choice is not between developing land for farming and developing land for solar."

                    In Houston, that is the choice.  

                    Which is why solar farms make more sense in SA than they do in Houston.

                    Maybe you missed my point, which was: projects such as these are better sited in San Antonio than in Houston.

                    I did not say they don't make sense in SA.  I said they make more sense in SA than they do in Houston.


                    ---In hreg@yahoogroups.com, <aburgin4peace@...> wrote :

                    I don't know when the last time was that you were in San Antonio, but saying there are not a lot of great uses for the land in San Antonio ignores completely what is happening in San Antonio. No, the areas in Bexar County itself are not competitively agricultural--but not because of lack of water, that's never stopped anyone, unfortunately. We're not an agricultural society over here, we're industrialized and urban. The "cost" for development of PV solar is giving up land that would ordinarily be developed by either commercial or residential developers. And with development reaching a fever pitch in San Antonio and Bexar County, the land cost for solar farms is high, in more ways than one.

                    The choice is not between developing land for farming and developing land for solar.

                    The choice is between developing land into profitable subdivisions and business development--and solar farms. The huge solar farm across from Baker Hughes Corporate office for the Eagle Ford Shale is a prime example. The land all around there is being purchased and developed by companies which have interests further south--in the shale, and is thus very valuable and very pricey land--but instead, it's a solar farm.

                    As to rooftop solar, we have a very high percentage of that in San Antonio, as well. It's not an either-or proposition, and it should never be proposed as such.


                    Alyssa Burgin


                    On Mon, Apr 14, 2014 at 9:06 AM, <public@...> wrote:


                    It's a beautiful system.  I really like the design of the tracking mounts.

                    I don't want to sound like a downer but I think projects such as these are better sited in San Antonio than in Houston.  Hear me out.

                    San Antonio is not great agricultural land, primarily because fresh water is a scarce resource.  Therefore, covering up the land with PV has a very minor ecological cost and may even be a net positive by decreasing evaporation (thus increasing soil moisture content).

                    The same installation in Houston has a much higher cost because it the land is much more ecologically and agriculturally productive.

                    Another way of saying it is that there aren't a lot of great uses for the land in SA but there are a lot of great uses for it in Houston.

                    One of the reasons I am such a fan of rooftop solar (in Houston) is because we can add it with zero additional ecological cost.  Building a house takes the land it sits on out of the ecological zone.

                    A neighborhood with a PV farm next to it is much larger and more ecologically costly than it needs to be.  You can put the PV farm on top of the houses, as rooftop solar, and achieve the same result at smaller ecological cost.  

                    So this is what I think should be done, as much as possible.




                    --
                    Alyssa Burgin
                    Executive Director
                    Texas Drought Project
                    www.texasdroughtproject.org/home.html

                    16306 Buena Tierra
                    San Antonio, Texas 78232
                    210-381-4021
                    "When the well is dry, we know the value of water."--Benjamin Franklin




                    --
                    Thanks, Bill S
                    Ph 832-338-3080
                    www.watt-tracker.com
                    www.promotingevs.com
                  • Michele Arnold
                    I agree with putting solar on our home roofs. Who knows of a residential solar dealer with prices a middle income person can afford? From:
                    Message 10 of 12 , Apr 14, 2014
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Re: [hreg] Re: Solar farm in San Antonio I agree with putting solar on our home roofs. Who knows of a residential solar dealer with prices a middle income person can afford?



                      From: <public@...>
                      Reply-To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                      Date: 14 Apr 2014 07:06:32 -0700
                      To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: [hreg] Re: Solar farm in San Antonio

                        
                       
                       
                         

                      It's a beautiful system.  I really like the design of the tracking mounts.

                      I don't want to sound like a downer but I think projects such as these are better sited in San Antonio than in Houston.  Hear me out.

                      San Antonio is not great agricultural land, primarily because fresh water is a scarce resource.  Therefore, covering up the land with PV has a very minor ecological cost and may even be a net positive by decreasing evaporation (thus increasing soil moisture content).

                      The same installation in Houston has a much higher cost because it the land is much more ecologically and agriculturally productive.

                      Another way of saying it is that there aren't a lot of great uses for the land in SA but there are a lot of great uses for it in Houston.

                      One of the reasons I am such a fan of rooftop solar (in Houston) is because we can add it with zero additional ecological cost.  Building a house takes the land it sits on out of the ecological zone.

                      A neighborhood with a PV farm next to it is much larger and more ecologically costly than it needs to be.  You can put the PV farm on top of the houses, as rooftop solar, and achieve the same result at smaller ecological cost.  

                      So this is what I think should be done, as much as possible.
                       
                         


                    • William Swann
                      HREG sponsors a class / intro to solar systems. Sign up is here If you choose to do
                      Message 11 of 12 , Apr 15, 2014
                      • 0 Attachment
                        HREG sponsors a class / intro to solar systems. Sign up is here <http://houstonrenewableenergy.org/2013/12/solar-energy-system-workshop/>
                        If you choose to do a self install, $ can be saved.


                        On Mon, Apr 14, 2014 at 2:02 PM, Michele Arnold <mawriter666@...> wrote:
                         

                        I agree with putting solar on our home roofs. Who knows of a residential solar dealer with prices a middle income person can afford?



                        From: <public@...>
                        Reply-To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                        Date: 14 Apr 2014 07:06:32 -0700
                        To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                        Subject: [hreg] Re: Solar farm in San Antonio


                          
                         
                         
                           

                        It's a beautiful system.  I really like the design of the tracking mounts.

                        I don't want to sound like a downer but I think projects such as these are better sited in San Antonio than in Houston.  Hear me out.

                        San Antonio is not great agricultural land, primarily because fresh water is a scarce resource.  Therefore, covering up the land with PV has a very minor ecological cost and may even be a net positive by decreasing evaporation (thus increasing soil moisture content).

                        The same installation in Houston has a much higher cost because it the land is much more ecologically and agriculturally productive.

                        Another way of saying it is that there aren't a lot of great uses for the land in SA but there are a lot of great uses for it in Houston.

                        One of the reasons I am such a fan of rooftop solar (in Houston) is because we can add it with zero additional ecological cost.  Building a house takes the land it sits on out of the ecological zone.

                        A neighborhood with a PV farm next to it is much larger and more ecologically costly than it needs to be.  You can put the PV farm on top of the houses, as rooftop solar, and achieve the same result at smaller ecological cost.  

                        So this is what I think should be done, as much as possible.
                         
                           





                        --
                        Thanks, Bill S
                        Ph 832-338-3080
                        www.watt-tracker.com
                        www.promotingevs.com
                      • Alyssa Burgin
                        At the risk of repeating myself, Houston would benefit by developing a program that includes rebates from utilities together with almost-guaranteed financing
                        Message 12 of 12 , Apr 15, 2014
                        • 0 Attachment
                          At the risk of repeating myself, Houston would benefit by developing a program that includes rebates from utilities together with almost-guaranteed financing from a local bank. This is what has been developed in San Antonio, CPS is the utility and Frost Bank is the bank. Take a look at Solar San Antonio for information, but an overall advocacy program SPECIFICALLY for solar would be a boon to the Houston area. Yes, there are challenges in siting solar in Houston. But metropolitan Houston, as they told me over and over again when I lived in Central America, is the size of the country of El Salvador. The options are many in a MSA of that size.

                          Alyssa Burgin


                          On Mon, Apr 14, 2014 at 2:02 PM, Michele Arnold <mawriter666@...> wrote:


                          I agree with putting solar on our home roofs. Who knows of a residential solar dealer with prices a middle income person can afford?



                          From: <public@...>
                          Reply-To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                          Date: 14 Apr 2014 07:06:32 -0700
                          To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
                          Subject: [hreg] Re: Solar farm in San Antonio


                            
                           
                           
                             

                          It's a beautiful system.  I really like the design of the tracking mounts.

                          I don't want to sound like a downer but I think projects such as these are better sited in San Antonio than in Houston.  Hear me out.

                          San Antonio is not great agricultural land, primarily because fresh water is a scarce resource.  Therefore, covering up the land with PV has a very minor ecological cost and may even be a net positive by decreasing evaporation (thus increasing soil moisture content).

                          The same installation in Houston has a much higher cost because it the land is much more ecologically and agriculturally productive.

                          Another way of saying it is that there aren't a lot of great uses for the land in SA but there are a lot of great uses for it in Houston.

                          One of the reasons I am such a fan of rooftop solar (in Houston) is because we can add it with zero additional ecological cost.  Building a house takes the land it sits on out of the ecological zone.

                          A neighborhood with a PV farm next to it is much larger and more ecologically costly than it needs to be.  You can put the PV farm on top of the houses, as rooftop solar, and achieve the same result at smaller ecological cost.  

                          So this is what I think should be done, as much as possible.
                           
                             







                          --
                          Alyssa Burgin
                          Executive Director
                          Texas Drought Project
                          www.texasdroughtproject.org/home.html

                          16306 Buena Tierra
                          San Antonio, Texas 78232
                          210-381-4021
                          "When the well is dry, we know the value of water."--Benjamin Franklin
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