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Chinese Producers Flood U.S. Market with Solar Cells and Modules Ahead of Upcoming Ruling in Solar Trade Case

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  • ralph parrott
    Wednesday, January 25, 2012 WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Chinese producers have more than doubled imports of crystalline silicon solar cells and modules in
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 25, 2012
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      Wednesday, January 25, 2012


      WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Chinese producers have more than doubled imports of crystalline silicon solar cells and modules in advance of potential U.S. government duties on those imports, according to an evaluation of U.S. Customs and Border Protection data released today by the Coalition for American Solar Manufacturing (CASM). The coalition, which represents 11,000 U.S. workers at more than 150 American companies across the country, alleges that the recent 110 percent surge in import volume since July 2011 is further proof of illegal dumping and subsidies by Chinese solar producers and warrants a finding of critical circumstances that would apply retroactive duties to Chinese imports.

      “This significant increase in imports demonstrates that the Chinese know they have violated U.S. and international trade rules and are trying to evade the consequences,” said Gordon Brinser, president of SolarWorld Industries America Inc., based in Oregon. “Year to date, Chinese imports of solar cells and modules in 2011 are up 346 percent by quantity and 138 percent by value. Since 2008, Chinese imports have risen 939 percent by value and 1664 percent by quantity. This most recent surge of Chinese solar imports gives the U.S. Department of Commerce the evidence it needs not only to make a preliminary determination in our favor, but also to apply a critical-circumstances finding to address this last-minute import surge.”

      Under U.S. trade law, Commerce can make a finding of critical circumstances that requires importers of record to post bonds or cash deposits on tariffs on imports dating back 90 days from preliminary determinations on whether duties are warranted and, if so, by what margin. A preliminary determination is expected on Feb. 13, meaning imports from Nov. 15 onward would be subject to duties.

      Using publicly available data from the Customs and Border Protection’s Port Import Export Reporting Service (PIERS), CASM researchers found imports from Wuxi Suntech Power Co. Ltd. (known as Suntech), a Chinese manufacturer and respondent in the ongoing trade investigations, surged 76 percent in November, compared with October. PIERS reports also show that imports from Changzhou Trina Solar Energy Co. Ltd. (known as Trina Solar), another Chinese manufacturer and respondent, spiked 209 percent in the first half of December, compared with the first half of November 2011.

      Further, CASM research found numerous examples of companies stockpiling dumped and illegally subsidized Chinese imports, providing credible evidence to support a finding of critical circumstance. For example, Sun Electronics, a Miami importer and wholesaler, brought in 31,000 Chinese solar laminates on a single day: Dec. 21, 2011. This enormous shipment, consisting of at least 77 shipping containers, required Sun Electronics to rent six forklifts and drivers and devote four-five other people to screen and sort the laminates. Sun Electronics noted in an advertisement that it has recently obtained an entire second storage warehouse, likely demonstrating its intent to receive other large shipments of Chinese solar products.

      “The Chinese have made it clear that, contrary to various World Trade Organization agreements they signed 10 years ago, they will employ any means necessary to dominate the American and international solar markets,” Brinser said. “Rather than reward the Chinese for cheating, Commerce and the International Trade Commission need to take every possible action to enable American manufacturers to compete fairly.”

      A complete list of the CASM findings can be found on the CASM website.

      On Dec. 2, the U.S. International Trade Commission issued a unanimous preliminary determination that Chinese trade practices are harming the U.S. domestic solar manufacturing industry. The next step in the trade case will be Commerce’s Feb. 13 preliminary determination on whether to levy countervailing import duties to offset the effects of any illegal Chinese subsidies. On March 28, Commerce is scheduled to make its preliminary antidumping determination, imposing duties to offset the effects of Chinese import pricing at artificially low prices.

      The Coalition for American Solar Manufacturing is made up of seven companies that manufacture solar cells and modules in the United States as well as more than 150 employers of more than 11,000 workers who have registered their support for CASM’s case as associate members. These member companies have plants in nearly every region in the United States, including the Northwest and California, the Southwest, Midwest, Northeast and South and support several thousand U.S. manufacturing jobs. For details about CASM, go to www.americansolarmanufacturing.org; email media questions to media@...; other questions or comments may be emailed to contact@....

       

       

      Ralph Parrott

      President

      http://www.txses.org/hreg

       

       

    • Tai-Lin Hong
      It is very difficult to understand why Chinese companies want to sell the solar cells at the price so low that it almost like give-aways. I do hope that US
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 25, 2012
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        It is very difficult to understand why Chinese companies want to sell the solar cells at the price so low that it almost like give-aways. I do hope that US goverment can sucessfully stop that kind of meaningless trade behaviors and restore the price of solar cells to the profitable level. At the mean time, many under-developed regions within China will have
        the opportunity to enjoy the modern renewable energy at discount prices after the Chinese companies re-direct their exports to their own vast domestic market and earn some renminbi which should appreciate 40% as requested by US.

        --- On Wed, 1/25/12, ralph parrott <ralph.parrott@...> wrote:

        From: ralph parrott <ralph.parrott@...>
        Subject: [hreg] Chinese Producers Flood U.S. Market with Solar Cells and Modules Ahead of Upcoming Ruling in Solar Trade Case
        To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, January 25, 2012, 8:36 PM

         

        Wednesday, January 25, 2012


        WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Chinese producers have more than doubled imports of crystalline silicon solar cells and modules in advance of potential U.S. government duties on those imports, according to an evaluation of U.S. Customs and Border Protection data released today by the Coalition for American Solar Manufacturing (CASM). The coalition, which represents 11,000 U.S. workers at more than 150 American companies across the country, alleges that the recent 110 percent surge in import volume since July 2011 is further proof of illegal dumping and subsidies by Chinese solar producers and warrants a finding of critical circumstances that would apply retroactive duties to Chinese imports.

        “This significant increase in imports demonstrates that the Chinese know they have violated U.S. and international trade rules and are trying to evade the consequences,” said Gordon Brinser, president of SolarWorld Industries America Inc., based in Oregon. “Year to date, Chinese imports of solar cells and modules in 2011 are up 346 percent by quantity and 138 percent by value. Since 2008, Chinese imports have risen 939 percent by value and 1664 percent by quantity. This most recent surge of Chinese solar imports gives the U.S. Department of Commerce the evidence it needs not only to make a preliminary determination in our favor, but also to apply a critical-circumstances finding to address this last-minute import surge.”

        Under U.S. trade law, Commerce can make a finding of critical circumstances that requires importers of record to post bonds or cash deposits on tariffs on imports dating back 90 days from preliminary determinations on whether duties are warranted and, if so, by what margin. A preliminary determination is expected on Feb. 13, meaning imports from Nov. 15 onward would be subject to duties.

        Using publicly available data from the Customs and Border Protection’s Port Import Export Reporting Service (PIERS), CASM researchers found imports from Wuxi Suntech Power Co. Ltd. (known as Suntech), a Chinese manufacturer and respondent in the ongoing trade investigations, surged 76 percent in November, compared with October. PIERS reports also show that imports from Changzhou Trina Solar Energy Co. Ltd. (known as Trina Solar), another Chinese manufacturer and respondent, spiked 209 percent in the first half of December, compared with the first half of November 2011.

        Further, CASM research found numerous examples of companies stockpiling dumped and illegally subsidized Chinese imports, providing credible evidence to support a finding of critical circumstance. For example, Sun Electronics, a Miami importer and wholesaler, brought in 31,000 Chinese solar laminates on a single day: Dec. 21, 2011. This enormous shipment, consisting of at least 77 shipping containers, required Sun Electronics to rent six forklifts and drivers and devote four-five other people to screen and sort the laminates. Sun Electronics noted in an advertisement that it has recently obtained an entire second storage warehouse, likely demonstrating its intent to receive other large shipments of Chinese solar products.

        “The Chinese have made it clear that, contrary to various World Trade Organization agreements they signed 10 years ago, they will employ any means necessary to dominate the American and international solar markets,” Brinser said. “Rather than reward the Chinese for cheating, Commerce and the International Trade Commission need to take every possible action to enable American manufacturers to compete fairly.”

        A complete list of the CASM findings can be found on the CASM website.

        On Dec. 2, the U.S. International Trade Commission issued a unanimous preliminary determination that Chinese trade practices are harming the U.S. domestic solar manufacturing industry. The next step in the trade case will be Commerce’s Feb. 13 preliminary determination on whether to levy countervailing import duties to offset the effects of any illegal Chinese subsidies. On March 28, Commerce is scheduled to make its preliminary antidumping determination, imposing duties to offset the effects of Chinese import pricing at artificially low prices.

        The Coalition for American Solar Manufacturing is made up of seven companies that manufacture solar cells and modules in the United States as well as more than 150 employers of more than 11,000 workers who have registered their support for CASM’s case as associate members. These member companies have plants in nearly every region in the United States, including the Northwest and California, the Southwest, Midwest, Northeast and South and support several thousand U.S. manufacturing jobs. For details about CASM, go to www.americansolarmanufacturing.org; email media questions to media@...; other questions or comments may be emailed to contact@....

         

         

        Ralph Parrott

        President

        http://www.txses.org/hreg

         

         

      • Jim Duncan
        The price collapse of PV grade silicon [currently ~$30.00/kg] cells happened for the same reason that the price spiked five years ago to over $400.00/kg.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 26, 2012
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          The price collapse of PV grade silicon [currently ~$30.00/kg] cells happened for the same reason that the price spiked five years ago to over $400.00/kg. Supply and demand.

          China expected the growth of US PV installations to mirror the EU growth, especially Germany, Spain and Italy. Chinas focus on creation of silicon refineries to meet the expected demand began.

          All it would have taken in the US was a national policy to induce the PV industry, a national RPS would have done it. Instead factions in Congress blocked the advancement of the domestic renewable energy industry but the growth of the silicon industry continued worldwide.

          About the same time the economy was collapsing in the US [though not China] EU PV growth spurred cuts in incentives slowing that red-hot market. Suddenly there was a glut of silicon cells on the market.

          Look for closures and consolidation of the PV industry in China in their silicon industry. Many late startups will vanish and the competition [and prices] will reverse their current trends.

          One thing to note, in 2011 the US was a NET EXPORTER of silicon cells and automated PV module assembly equipment.

           

           

           

           

          From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tai-Lin Hong
          Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 10:30 PM
          To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [hreg] Chinese Producers Flood U.S. Market with Solar Cells and Modules Ahead of Upcoming Ruling in Solar Trade Case

           

          It is very difficult to understand why Chinese companies want to sell the solar cells at the price so low that it almost like give-aways. I do hope that US goverment can sucessfully stop that kind of meaningless trade behaviors and restore the price of solar cells to the profitable level. At the mean time, many under-developed regions within China will have
          the opportunity to enjoy the modern renewable energy at discount prices after the Chinese companies re-direct their exports to their own vast domestic market and earn some renminbi which should appreciate 40% as requested by US.

          --- On Wed, 1/25/12, ralph parrott <ralph.parrott@...> wrote:


          From: ralph parrott <ralph.parrott@...>
          Subject: [hreg] Chinese Producers Flood U.S. Market with Solar Cells and Modules Ahead of Upcoming Ruling in Solar Trade Case
          To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, January 25, 2012, 8:36 PM

           

          Wednesday, January 25, 2012


          WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Chinese producers have more than doubled imports of crystalline silicon solar cells and modules in advance of potential U.S. government duties on those imports, according to an evaluation of U.S. Customs and Border Protection data released today by the Coalition for American Solar Manufacturing (CASM). The coalition, which represents 11,000 U.S. workers at more than 150 American companies across the country, alleges that the recent 110 percent surge in import volume since July 2011 is further proof of illegal dumping and subsidies by Chinese solar producers and warrants a finding of critical circumstances that would apply retroactive duties to Chinese imports.

          “This significant increase in imports demonstrates that the Chinese know they have violated U.S. and international trade rules and are trying to evade the consequences,” said Gordon Brinser, president of SolarWorld Industries America Inc., based in Oregon. “Year to date, Chinese imports of solar cells and modules in 2011 are up 346 percent by quantity and 138 percent by value. Since 2008, Chinese imports have risen 939 percent by value and 1664 percent by quantity. This most recent surge of Chinese solar imports gives the U.S. Department of Commerce the evidence it needs not only to make a preliminary determination in our favor, but also to apply a critical-circumstances finding to address this last-minute import surge.”

          Under U.S. trade law, Commerce can make a finding of critical circumstances that requires importers of record to post bonds or cash deposits on tariffs on imports dating back 90 days from preliminary determinations on whether duties are warranted and, if so, by what margin. A preliminary determination is expected on Feb. 13, meaning imports from Nov. 15 onward would be subject to duties.

          Using publicly available data from the Customs and Border Protection’s Port Import Export Reporting Service (PIERS), CASM researchers found imports from Wuxi Suntech Power Co. Ltd. (known as Suntech), a Chinese manufacturer and respondent in the ongoing trade investigations, surged 76 percent in November, compared with October. PIERS reports also show that imports from Changzhou Trina Solar Energy Co. Ltd. (known as Trina Solar), another Chinese manufacturer and respondent, spiked 209 percent in the first half of December, compared with the first half of November 2011.

          Further, CASM research found numerous examples of companies stockpiling dumped and illegally subsidized Chinese imports, providing credible evidence to support a finding of critical circumstance. For example, Sun Electronics, a Miami importer and wholesaler, brought in 31,000 Chinese solar laminates on a single day: Dec. 21, 2011. This enormous shipment, consisting of at least 77 shipping containers, required Sun Electronics to rent six forklifts and drivers and devote four-five other people to screen and sort the laminates. Sun Electronics noted in an advertisement that it has recently obtained an entire second storage warehouse, likely demonstrating its intent to receive other large shipments of Chinese solar products.

          “The Chinese have made it clear that, contrary to various World Trade Organization agreements they signed 10 years ago, they will employ any means necessary to dominate the American and international solar markets,” Brinser said. “Rather than reward the Chinese for cheating, Commerce and the International Trade Commission need to take every possible action to enable American manufacturers to compete fairly.”

          A complete list of the CASM findings can be found on the CASM website.

          On Dec. 2, the U.S. International Trade Commission issued a unanimous preliminary determination that Chinese trade practices are harming the U.S. domestic solar manufacturing industry. The next step in the trade case will be Commerce’s Feb. 13 preliminary determination on whether to levy countervailing import duties to offset the effects of any illegal Chinese subsidies. On March 28, Commerce is scheduled to make its preliminary antidumping determination, imposing duties to offset the effects of Chinese import pricing at artificially low prices.

          The Coalition for American Solar Manufacturing is made up of seven companies that manufacture solar cells and modules in the United States as well as more than 150 employers of more than 11,000 workers who have registered their support for CASM’s case as associate members. These member companies have plants in nearly every region in the United States, including the Northwest and California, the Southwest, Midwest, Northeast and South and support several thousand U.S. manufacturing jobs. For details about CASM, go to www.americansolarmanufacturing.org; email media questions to media@...; other questions or comments may be emailed to contact@....

           

           

          Ralph Parrott

          President

          http://www.txses.org/hreg

           

           

           

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