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Another step in conservation

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  • Garth & Kim Travis
    Greetings, I got an early Christmas Present this year. A modern Necchi treadle machine to go into my antique cabinet. I now sew by human power. I thought I
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 6, 2011
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      Greetings,

      I got an early Christmas Present this year. A modern Necchi treadle
      machine to go into my antique cabinet. I now sew by human power. I
      thought I would share what I have learned in case there are other sewers
      on the list.

      I originally saw the Necchi in the Lehman's catalog and discovered the
      really expensive part is the cabinet and treadle. So we went to Craig's
      list and looked for a treadle with the cabinet in good condition. I
      bought an 1880s model, New Home Favorite. The treadle machine still
      works and has the original owners manual. The unit had been well cared
      for. But, I do not recommend buying one that old. A early 1900s is a
      better treadle, as they changed the design early in the century.
      Something my Mother forgot to tell me until after I had purchased mine.

      The difference is in how easy it is to go backwards by accident. The
      machines don't like that. The newer cabinets are better.

      My new machine arrived this week. I removed the old machine from the
      cabinet, making a template of what it requires. The old machine is for
      sale. Then, I used cardboard to make a template of what the new machine
      needed. I had to extend the hole by an inch and a half. The new
      machine dropped right in. The cover will fit over it nicely, so when it
      is sitting in the living room, it still looks like a beautiful antique.

      But lift the lid and the new machine is there. It is a joy to sew with.
      Fully adjustable. It will sew the heaviest denim easily, I know as I
      am using it right now to quilt a heavy denim quilt. But I also tested
      it on some light shear. It does like a piece of paper with extremely
      light materials, but most machines do. It is much easier to adjust and
      more versatile that my Singer Decor, which is also for sale now.

      It is fun, doing button holes and fancy stitching, with a treadle. I
      have the best of the old with the best of the new. The feed dogs will
      drop for stitch painting, and it has fancy stitches built in. I can
      monogram towels and stuff with it, as well as sew.

      Best of all, no electricity needed.

      One draw back. Since I don't plug the machine in, it has no sewing
      light. So, at night, I need to turn a light on and aim it at my sewing.

      And, the machine comes with the adapters and parts to use it as an
      electric, if you chose to. Not that I ever will, but it has them.

      While this will take the rest of my life to pay for, by figuring the
      amount of electricity used. It was a good deal for me, since none of my
      existing machines were capable of quilting my quilt. A new machine was
      in my future, so it made sense to go non electric. Total cost of my
      project was around five hundred dollars.


      --
      Bright Blessings,
      Garth & Kim Travis
      www.TheRoseColoredForest.com
      Bedias, Texas
    • kevin conlin
      How neat! Thanks for sharing! Kevin Conlin Heliosolar Design Inc PO Box 1938 Alief, TX 77411 281-202-9629 kevin@heliosolardesign.com From:
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 6, 2011
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        How neat!  Thanks for sharing!

         

        Kevin Conlin

        Heliosolar Design Inc

        PO Box 1938

        Alief, TX 77411

        281-202-9629

        kevin@...

         

         

         

         

        From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Garth & Kim Travis
        Sent: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 7:41 AM
        To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [hreg] Another step in conservation

         

         

        Greetings,

        I got an early Christmas Present this year. A modern Necchi treadle
        machine to go into my antique cabinet. I now sew by human power. I
        thought I would share what I have learned in case there are other sewers
        on the list.

        I originally saw the Necchi in the Lehman's catalog and discovered the
        really expensive part is the cabinet and treadle. So we went to Craig's
        list and looked for a treadle with the cabinet in good condition. I
        bought an 1880s model, New Home Favorite. The treadle machine still
        works and has the original owners manual. The unit had been well cared
        for. But, I do not recommend buying one that old. A early 1900s is a
        better treadle, as they changed the design early in the century.
        Something my Mother forgot to tell me until after I had purchased mine.

        The difference is in how easy it is to go backwards by accident. The
        machines don't like that. The newer cabinets are better.

        My new machine arrived this week. I removed the old machine from the
        cabinet, making a template of what it requires. The old machine is for
        sale. Then, I used cardboard to make a template of what the new machine
        needed. I had to extend the hole by an inch and a half. The new
        machine dropped right in. The cover will fit over it nicely, so when it
        is sitting in the living room, it still looks like a beautiful antique.

        But lift the lid and the new machine is there. It is a joy to sew with.
        Fully adjustable. It will sew the heaviest denim easily, I know as I
        am using it right now to quilt a heavy denim quilt. But I also tested
        it on some light shear. It does like a piece of paper with extremely
        light materials, but most machines do. It is much easier to adjust and
        more versatile that my Singer Decor, which is also for sale now.

        It is fun, doing button holes and fancy stitching, with a treadle. I
        have the best of the old with the best of the new. The feed dogs will
        drop for stitch painting, and it has fancy stitches built in. I can
        monogram towels and stuff with it, as well as sew.

        Best of all, no electricity needed.

        One draw back. Since I don't plug the machine in, it has no sewing
        light. So, at night, I need to turn a light on and aim it at my sewing.

        And, the machine comes with the adapters and parts to use it as an
        electric, if you chose to. Not that I ever will, but it has them.

        While this will take the rest of my life to pay for, by figuring the
        amount of electricity used. It was a good deal for me, since none of my
        existing machines were capable of quilting my quilt. A new machine was
        in my future, so it made sense to go non electric. Total cost of my
        project was around five hundred dollars.

        --
        Bright Blessings,
        Garth & Kim Travis
        www.TheRoseColoredForest.com
        Bedias, Texas

      • evelyn sardina
        I have been hoping for one but only found some pretty expensive ones. Thanks for sharing I need to start looking again. I sewed on one as a child. ... From:
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 6, 2011
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          I have been hoping for one but only found some pretty expensive ones. Thanks for sharing I need to start looking again. I sewed on one as a child.

          --- On Tue, 12/6/11, kevin conlin <kevin@...> wrote:

          From: kevin conlin <kevin@...>
          Subject: RE: [hreg] Another step in conservation
          To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, December 6, 2011, 10:27 AM

           

          How neat!  Thanks for sharing!

           

          Kevin Conlin

          Heliosolar Design Inc

          PO Box 1938

          Alief, TX 77411

          281-202-9629

          kevin@...

           

           

           

           

          From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Garth & Kim Travis
          Sent: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 7:41 AM
          To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [hreg] Another step in conservation

           

           

          Greetings,

          I got an early Christmas Present this year. A modern Necchi treadle
          machine to go into my antique cabinet. I now sew by human power. I
          thought I would share what I have learned in case there are other sewers
          on the list.

          I originally saw the Necchi in the Lehman's catalog and discovered the
          really expensive part is the cabinet and treadle. So we went to Craig's
          list and looked for a treadle with the cabinet in good condition. I
          bought an 1880s model, New Home Favorite. The treadle machine still
          works and has the original owners manual. The unit had been well cared
          for. But, I do not recommend buying one that old. A early 1900s is a
          better treadle, as they changed the design early in the century.
          Something my Mother forgot to tell me until after I had purchased mine.

          The difference is in how easy it is to go backwards by accident. The
          machines don't like that. The newer cabinets are better.

          My new machine arrived this week. I removed the old machine from the
          cabinet, making a template of what it requires. The old machine is for
          sale. Then, I used cardboard to make a template of what the new machine
          needed. I had to extend the hole by an inch and a half. The new
          machine dropped right in. The cover will fit over it nicely, so when it
          is sitting in the living room, it still looks like a beautiful antique.

          But lift the lid and the new machine is there. It is a joy to sew with.
          Fully adjustable. It will sew the heaviest denim easily, I know as I
          am using it right now to quilt a heavy denim quilt. But I also tested
          it on some light shear. It does like a piece of paper with extremely
          light materials, but most machines do. It is much easier to adjust and
          more versatile that my Singer Decor, which is also for sale now.

          It is fun, doing button holes and fancy stitching, with a treadle. I
          have the best of the old with the best of the new. The feed dogs will
          drop for stitch painting, and it has fancy stitches built in. I can
          monogram towels and stuff with it, as well as sew.

          Best of all, no electricity needed.

          One draw back. Since I don't plug the machine in, it has no sewing
          light. So, at night, I need to turn a light on and aim it at my sewing.

          And, the machine comes with the adapters and parts to use it as an
          electric, if you chose to. Not that I ever will, but it has them.

          While this will take the rest of my life to pay for, by figuring the
          amount of electricity used. It was a good deal for me, since none of my
          existing machines were capable of quilting my quilt. A new machine was
          in my future, so it made sense to go non electric. Total cost of my
          project was around five hundred dollars.

          --
          Bright Blessings,
          Garth & Kim Travis
          www.TheRoseColoredForest.com
          Bedias, Texas

        • Garth & Kim Travis
          Greetings, We found the Dallas Craig s list was much cheaper than the Houston one. Bright Blessings, Garth & Kim Travis www.TheRoseColoredForest.com Bedias,
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 6, 2011
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            Greetings,
            We found the Dallas Craig's list was much cheaper than the Houston one.

            Bright Blessings,
            Garth & Kim Travis
            www.TheRoseColoredForest.com
            Bedias, Texas

            On 12/6/2011 12:54 PM, evelyn sardina wrote:
            > I have been hoping for one but only found some pretty expensive ones.
            > Thanks for sharing I need to start looking again. I sewed on one as a child.
            >
            > --- On *Tue, 12/6/11, kevin conlin /<kevin@...>/* wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: kevin conlin <kevin@...>
            > Subject: RE: [hreg] Another step in conservation
            > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Tuesday, December 6, 2011, 10:27 AM
            >
            > How neat! Thanks for sharing!
            >
            > Kevin Conlin
            >
            > Heliosolar Design Inc
            >
            > PO Box 1938
            >
            > Alief, TX 77411
            >
            > 281-202-9629
            >
            > kevin@...
            >
            > *From:*hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf
            > Of *Garth & Kim Travis
            > *Sent:* Tuesday, December 06, 2011 7:41 AM
            > *To:* hreg@yahoogroups.com
            > *Subject:* [hreg] Another step in conservation
            >
            > Greetings,
            >
            > I got an early Christmas Present this year. A modern Necchi treadle
            > machine to go into my antique cabinet. I now sew by human power. I
            > thought I would share what I have learned in case there are other
            > sewers
            > on the list.
            >
            > I originally saw the Necchi in the Lehman's catalog and discovered the
            > really expensive part is the cabinet and treadle. So we went to Craig's
            > list and looked for a treadle with the cabinet in good condition. I
            > bought an 1880s model, New Home Favorite. The treadle machine still
            > works and has the original owners manual. The unit had been well cared
            > for. But, I do not recommend buying one that old. A early 1900s is a
            > better treadle, as they changed the design early in the century.
            > Something my Mother forgot to tell me until after I had purchased mine.
            >
            > The difference is in how easy it is to go backwards by accident. The
            > machines don't like that. The newer cabinets are better.
            >
            > My new machine arrived this week. I removed the old machine from the
            > cabinet, making a template of what it requires. The old machine is for
            > sale. Then, I used cardboard to make a template of what the new machine
            > needed. I had to extend the hole by an inch and a half. The new
            > machine dropped right in. The cover will fit over it nicely, so when it
            > is sitting in the living room, it still looks like a beautiful antique.
            >
            > But lift the lid and the new machine is there. It is a joy to sew with.
            > Fully adjustable. It will sew the heaviest denim easily, I know as I
            > am using it right now to quilt a heavy denim quilt. But I also tested
            > it on some light shear. It does like a piece of paper with extremely
            > light materials, but most machines do. It is much easier to adjust and
            > more versatile that my Singer Decor, which is also for sale now.
            >
            > It is fun, doing button holes and fancy stitching, with a treadle. I
            > have the best of the old with the best of the new. The feed dogs will
            > drop for stitch painting, and it has fancy stitches built in. I can
            > monogram towels and stuff with it, as well as sew.
            >
            > Best of all, no electricity needed.
            >
            > One draw back. Since I don't plug the machine in, it has no sewing
            > light. So, at night, I need to turn a light on and aim it at my sewing.
            >
            > And, the machine comes with the adapters and parts to use it as an
            > electric, if you chose to. Not that I ever will, but it has them.
            >
            > While this will take the rest of my life to pay for, by figuring the
            > amount of electricity used. It was a good deal for me, since none of my
            > existing machines were capable of quilting my quilt. A new machine was
            > in my future, so it made sense to go non electric. Total cost of my
            > project was around five hundred dollars.
            >
            > --
            > Bright Blessings,
            > Garth & Kim Travis
            > www.TheRoseColoredForest.com <http://www.TheRoseColoredForest.com>
            > Bedias, Texas
            >
            >
          • Adeel Akhtar
            http://www.pv-tech.org/news/ikea_increases_southern_us_presence_by_75 Many of you have probably seen the article already in today s Chronicle announcing IKEA s
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 6, 2011
            • 0 Attachment

              http://www.pv-tech.org/news/ikea_increases_southern_us_presence_by_75

              Many of you have probably seen the article already in today's Chronicle announcing IKEA's plans on installing a 1.3MW solar system on its Katy FWY facility.  If not, check it out on http://fuelfix.com/blog/2011/12/06/ikea-plans-to-install-solar-panels-on-houston-store/

              The above article from pv-tech.org goes into a bit more detail on IKEA's larger plans.  This goes a long way in giving solar energy mainstream credibility in our city!  I can't wait to go check this out first hand after its commissioned, and we should all do our best to take real action and support businesses in our area that operate environmentally friendly facilities.  Money talks - It will cause other businesses to follow suit!

              Happy Holidays.



            • evelyn sardina
              Thanks I will check it out! ... From: Garth & Kim Travis Subject: Re: [hreg] Another step in conservation To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 7, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks I will check it out!

                --- On Tue, 12/6/11, Garth & Kim Travis <gartht@...> wrote:

                From: Garth & Kim Travis <gartht@...>
                Subject: Re: [hreg] Another step in conservation
                To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tuesday, December 6, 2011, 12:57 PM

                 
                Greetings,
                We found the Dallas Craig's list was much cheaper than the Houston one.

                Bright Blessings,
                Garth & Kim Travis
                www.TheRoseColoredForest.com
                Bedias, Texas

                On 12/6/2011 12:54 PM, evelyn sardina wrote:
                > I have been hoping for one but only found some pretty expensive ones.
                > Thanks for sharing I need to start looking again. I sewed on one as a child.
                >
                > --- On *Tue, 12/6/11, kevin conlin /<kevin@...>/* wrote:
                >
                >
                > From: kevin conlin <kevin@...>
                > Subject: RE: [hreg] Another step in conservation
                > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Tuesday, December 6, 2011, 10:27 AM
                >
                > How neat! Thanks for sharing!
                >
                > Kevin Conlin
                >
                > Heliosolar Design Inc
                >
                > PO Box 1938
                >
                > Alief, TX 77411
                >
                > 281-202-9629
                >
                > kevin@...
                >
                > *From:*hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf
                > Of *Garth & Kim Travis
                > *Sent:* Tuesday, December 06, 2011 7:41 AM
                > *To:* hreg@yahoogroups.com
                > *Subject:* [hreg] Another step in conservation
                >
                > Greetings,
                >
                > I got an early Christmas Present this year. A modern Necchi treadle
                > machine to go into my antique cabinet. I now sew by human power. I
                > thought I would share what I have learned in case there are other
                > sewers
                > on the list.
                >
                > I originally saw the Necchi in the Lehman's catalog and discovered the
                > really expensive part is the cabinet and treadle. So we went to Craig's
                > list and looked for a treadle with the cabinet in good condition. I
                > bought an 1880s model, New Home Favorite. The treadle machine still
                > works and has the original owners manual. The unit had been well cared
                > for. But, I do not recommend buying one that old. A early 1900s is a
                > better treadle, as they changed the design early in the century.
                > Something my Mother forgot to tell me until after I had purchased mine.
                >
                > The difference is in how easy it is to go backwards by accident. The
                > machines don't like that. The newer cabinets are better.
                >
                > My new machine arrived this week. I removed the old machine from the
                > cabinet, making a template of what it requires. The old machine is for
                > sale. Then, I used cardboard to make a template of what the new machine
                > needed. I had to extend the hole by an inch and a half. The new
                > machine dropped right in. The cover will fit over it nicely, so when it
                > is sitting in the living room, it still looks like a beautiful antique.
                >
                > But lift the lid and the new machine is there. It is a joy to sew with.
                > Fully adjustable. It will sew the heaviest denim easily, I know as I
                > am using it right now to quilt a heavy denim quilt. But I also tested
                > it on some light shear. It does like a piece of paper with extremely
                > light materials, but most machines do. It is much easier to adjust and
                > more versatile that my Singer Decor, which is also for sale now.
                >
                > It is fun, doing button holes and fancy stitching, with a treadle. I
                > have the best of the old with the best of the new. The feed dogs will
                > drop for stitch painting, and it has fancy stitches built in. I can
                > monogram towels and stuff with it, as well as sew.
                >
                > Best of all, no electricity needed.
                >
                > One draw back. Since I don't plug the machine in, it has no sewing
                > light. So, at night, I need to turn a light on and aim it at my sewing.
                >
                > And, the machine comes with the adapters and parts to use it as an
                > electric, if you chose to. Not that I ever will, but it has them.
                >
                > While this will take the rest of my life to pay for, by figuring the
                > amount of electricity used. It was a good deal for me, since none of my
                > existing machines were capable of quilting my quilt. A new machine was
                > in my future, so it made sense to go non electric. Total cost of my
                > project was around five hundred dollars.
                >
                > --
                > Bright Blessings,
                > Garth & Kim Travis
                > www.TheRoseColoredForest.com <http://www.TheRoseColoredForest.com>
                > Bedias, Texas
                >
                >
              • Lucy Stolzenburg
                IKEA rocks. We see their cabinetry often on the Austin Cool House Tour because they use sustainably farmed woods and low voc adhesives. They have been
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 9, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  IKEA rocks. 
                  We see their cabinetry often on the Austin Cool House Tour because they use sustainably farmed woods and low voc adhesives. They have been responsible for a long time.
                  1.3MW is a very attractive system. Thanks for the heads up Adeel. This will go into the Solar News page on the TXSES Website.
                  HREG folks...we check the solar news around the state (sometimes diligently and sometimes not depending on how busy we are). If you see something of interest 
                  in the Houston area, or anywhere in Texas for that mater, please send me the link.
                  May thanks to you all,
                  Lucy


                  Lucy Stolzenburg
                  Texas Solar Energy Society


                  On Dec 6, 2011, at 3:52 PM, Adeel Akhtar wrote:

                   


                  http://www.pv-tech.org/news/ikea_increases_southern_us_presence_by_75

                  Many of you have probably seen the article already in today's Chronicle announcing IKEA's plans on installing a 1.3MW solar system on its Katy FWY facility.  If not, check it out on http://fuelfix.com/blog/2011/12/06/ikea-plans-to-install-solar-panels-on-houston-store/

                  The above article from pv-tech.org goes into a bit more detail on IKEA's larger plans.  This goes a long way in giving solar energy mainstream credibility in our city!  I can't wait to go check this out first hand after its commissioned, and we should all do our best to take real action and support businesses in our area that operate environmentally friendly facilities.  Money talks - It will cause other businesses to follow suit!

                  Happy Holidays.





                • Eileen Nehiley
                  That is surprising. The last I read in an article about the deforestation in China was that IKEA & Home Depot are among the companies that use illegally
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 9, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    That is surprising. The last I read in an article about the deforestation in China was that IKEA & Home Depot are among the companies that use illegally harvested wood . . . clear cutting in areas not allowed. Either they have changed their practices or something isn't accurate.
                     
                    Eileen

                    On Fri, Dec 9, 2011 at 12:08 PM, Lucy Stolzenburg <lucy@...> wrote:
                    IKEA rocks. 
                    We see their cabinetry often on the Austin Cool House Tour because they use sustainably farmed woods and low voc adhesives. They have been responsible for a long time.
                    1.3MW is a very attractive system. Thanks for the heads up Adeel. This will go into the Solar News page on the TXSES Website.
                    HREG folks...we check the solar news around the state (sometimes diligently and sometimes not depending on how busy we are). If you see something of interest 
                    in the Houston area, or anywhere in Texas for that mater, please send me the link.
                    May thanks to you all,
                    Lucy


                    Lucy Stolzenburg
                    Texas Solar Energy Society


                    On Dec 6, 2011, at 3:52 PM, Adeel Akhtar wrote:

                     


                    http://www.pv-tech.org/news/ikea_increases_southern_us_presence_by_75

                    Many of you have probably seen the article already in today's Chronicle announcing IKEA's plans on installing a 1.3MW solar system on its Katy FWY facility.  If not, check it out on http://fuelfix.com/blog/2011/12/06/ikea-plans-to-install-solar-panels-on-houston-store/

                    The above article from pv-tech.org goes into a bit more detail on IKEA's larger plans.  This goes a long way in giving solar energy mainstream credibility in our city!  I can't wait to go check this out first hand after its commissioned, and we should all do our best to take real action and support businesses in our area that operate environmentally friendly facilities.  Money talks - It will cause other businesses to follow suit!

                    Happy Holidays.








                    --
                    "In every culture and in every medical tradition before ours, healing was accomplished by moving energy." Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, Nobel Laureate in Medicine
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