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Re: [hreg] Re: Electricity deregulation

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  • William M. Bell, Jr.
    I think that Claude has hit on a great idea!!! As a shareholder, we will have access to detailed information about the company s investments into renewable
    Message 1 of 19 , Jun 6, 2001
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      I think that Claude has hit on a great idea!!! As a shareholder, we will
      have access to detailed information about the company's investments into
      renewable energy. I have been suspect of some of these company's claims.
      When I tried to asked specific questions, no one answered. I plan to buy
      some stock and become a customer and watch what happens. If public demand
      increases, then the competition for this area should also increase.

      Please correct me if I am wrong, but I was under the impression that these
      guys are merely buying power from other producers. Not that this is bad. It
      allows us, as shareholders and customers, to influence where they go to buy.
      They are not locked into a plant that they have built or purchased. They may
      have long-term contracts, but that is generally shorter than ownership. This
      means that they can switch to wind or solar if the shareholders (the owners)
      want to do so.

      But it also means that they could be buying electricity from sources that
      are not as "green" as I would like them to be. I was never clear how much
      green had to be in the mix to allow them to call the entire enchilada
      "green." I was never really clear either on what is "green" according to
      their definition.

      William M. Bell, Jr.
      PO Box 926
      Fulshear, Texas 77441-0926
      wmb@...
      Telephone: 713-439-1115
      Fax (bus hours only) 281-346-0994

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Claude Foster <ccfoster@...>
      To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2001 9:11 AM
      Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: Electricity deregulation


      > If you really want to know how a company is run, buy some of their stock.
      > This will put you in the position of directing (a little bit) by voting
      how
      > the company works.
      >
      > Electrical costs from conventional plants are going up as fuel cost
      > increase. Wind, solar, and hydro, renewable resources, and nuclear require
      > high capital expenditure and interest rates for capital are low now. Their
      > are slightly more hazards associated with nuclear but the other clean
      > sources have some hazards and impacts that have been set aside for a
      while.
      > This seems to be the best of times to invest capital in energy companies.
      > Green Mountain appears to be stepping in the right direction but they also
      > need input from their stock holders. Lets speak together.
      >
      >
    • Ryan McMullan
      According to GME, their power is 100% wind generated. They provide a state-mandated breakdown (by Coal and lignite, Natural gas, Nuclear, Renewable Energy)
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 6, 2001
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        According to GME, their power is 100% wind generated. They
        provide a state-mandated breakdown (by Coal and lignite, Natural gas,
        Nuclear, Renewable Energy) and their state-registered mix is 100%
        "Renewable Energy (wind)" (statewide average for Renewable is <1%). I
        think being a shareholder to get the inside track is a great idea,
        too. The closest stock I could find was Green Mountain Power (trades as
        GMP), which was trading at 15.51 today. I think that's the same or related
        company as Green Mountain Energy Company, but I'm not positive.

        Ryan

        At 02:03 PM 6/6/01 -0500, you wrote:
        >I think that Claude has hit on a great idea!!! As a shareholder, we will
        >have access to detailed information about the company's investments into
        >renewable energy. I have been suspect of some of these company's claims.
        >When I tried to asked specific questions, no one answered. I plan to buy
        >some stock and become a customer and watch what happens. If public demand
        >increases, then the competition for this area should also increase.
        >
        >Please correct me if I am wrong, but I was under the impression that these
        >guys are merely buying power from other producers. Not that this is bad. It
        >allows us, as shareholders and customers, to influence where they go to buy.
        >They are not locked into a plant that they have built or purchased. They may
        >have long-term contracts, but that is generally shorter than ownership. This
        >means that they can switch to wind or solar if the shareholders (the owners)
        >want to do so.
        >
        >But it also means that they could be buying electricity from sources that
        >are not as "green" as I would like them to be. I was never clear how much
        >green had to be in the mix to allow them to call the entire enchilada
        >"green." I was never really clear either on what is "green" according to
        >their definition.
        >
        >William M. Bell, Jr.
        >PO Box 926
        >Fulshear, Texas 77441-0926
        >wmb@...
        >Telephone: 713-439-1115
        >Fax (bus hours only) 281-346-0994
        >
        >----- Original Message -----
        >From: Claude Foster <ccfoster@...>
        >To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
        >Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2001 9:11 AM
        >Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: Electricity deregulation
        >
        >
        > > If you really want to know how a company is run, buy some of their stock.
        > > This will put you in the position of directing (a little bit) by voting
        >how
        > > the company works.
        > >
        > > Electrical costs from conventional plants are going up as fuel cost
        > > increase. Wind, solar, and hydro, renewable resources, and nuclear require
        > > high capital expenditure and interest rates for capital are low now. Their
        > > are slightly more hazards associated with nuclear but the other clean
        > > sources have some hazards and impacts that have been set aside for a
        >while.
        > > This seems to be the best of times to invest capital in energy companies.
        > > Green Mountain appears to be stepping in the right direction but they also
        > > need input from their stock holders. Lets speak together.
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • Michael Begley
        I asked them these questions. Here is what they said. The power they put on the grid will be 100% Texas wind power. They have three to six months from the
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 6, 2001
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          I asked them these questions. Here is what they said.
          The power they put on the grid will be 100% Texas wind power.
          They have three to six months from the time you use it to
          put it on the grid. They have a contract with a 300 Mw west Texas
          wind farm.
          So if their customers use power equivalent to a 500 Mw consumption
          in the summer, but only 100 Mw in the winter, it averages out.
          I am not sure what they do if they sign up more customers
          than they have power production.
          In other states, Green Mountain uses natural gas plants, and
          a small amount of wind and solar power, but here in Texas,
          the literature claims it to be 100% renewables. I shall watch
          and see.

          >Charlie,
          >
          >I was going to wait until after dereg started to even consider switching. Every piece of info I saw stated in the fine print that the prices were only guaranteed until the end of the year. So they aren't committing to anything. I came to the same pricing conclusion that Mike did about Green Mountain, but deferred signing up until I could find out where exactly they had a wind farm, whether they guarantee 100% renewable use, and how much "dirty" system power are they allowed to use in the mix? And heaven only knows what wrench the legislature is going to throw into the process.
          >
          >One conclusion that keeps popping into my mind: The less I use, the less I pay. 100% rate of return on conservation.
          >
          >My 2 cents.
          >
          >James
          >
          --
          --Mike
        • ChasMauch@aol.com
          I believe Green Mountain Power was the parent company from which Green Mountain Energy was spun off and became a separate, independent company. GMP is located
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 6, 2001
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            I believe Green Mountain Power was the parent company from which Green
            Mountain Energy was spun off and became a separate, independent company. GMP
            is located in Vermont and gets its energy from a mix of sources including
            hydro, coal, and nuclear. GME has its office in Austin and uses all wind
            power. GMP is publicly traded on the stock exchange but unfortunately I think
            GME is privately held and its stock is not available to the general public.
            I'm not sure but think that is the case. According to some literature they
            gave me, you can get more company info from Eleanor Scott 512-691-6316 email
            eleanor.scott@... or Marci Grossman 512-691-6310 email
            marci.grossman@.... The website is www.greenmountain.com.
            Charlie
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