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Re: West-facing window heat gain issue

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  • SusanD
    I m not sure if I m going to be able to attend the meeting yet. I would love to get to come and to meet everybody!! My daughter just had a baby and they live
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 14, 2011
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      I'm not sure if I'm going to be able to attend the meeting yet. I would love to get to come and to meet everybody!! My daughter just had a baby and they live in New Braunfels, so I've had to be on the road quite a lot and am not sure, yet, what next weekend holds in store for me.

      Thanks for all the suggestions!!

      Susan

      --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, MIchele Arnold <mawriter666@...> wrote:
      >
      > Dear Susan,
      > I would replace the door with another that has a window and would put up a
      > curtain on window ­ with backing that reflects the heat, just in the summer.
      > I would also begin amending the soil around your struggling elm with
      > composted material. I, too, hang my laundry and have endured taunts from my
      > neighbors. Are you attending the HREG meeting on July 21?
      > Best,
      > Michele
      >
      >
      >
      > From: SusanD <texasblessings@...>
      > Reply-To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2011 05:30:16 -0000
      > To: <hreg@yahoogroups.com>
      > Subject: [hreg] Re: West-facing window heat gain issue
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > P.S.: I had a west-facing door with internal operable blinds encased
      > between the glasses at this same property and the blinds did not operate
      > well during the heat of the day due to their expansion within the glass, so
      > I have nixed that idea pretty much.
      >
      > --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com <mailto:hreg%40yahoogroups.com> , "SusanD"
      > <texasblessings@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I wonder if any of you can offer suggestions:
      > >
      > > I have a 36" X 80" west-facing exterior door that goes out of my laundry room
      > to my solar & wind powered clothes dryer (AKA my clothesline)is located. The
      > door has a very large gas-filled double paned glass window in it and the laundry
      > room would be very dark without the provided natural light. The door was
      > salvaged out of a UT remodel and I purchased it through the Habitat for Humanity
      > restore several years back, but it has seen better days and has a large area of
      > rot, and I need to replace it. It is one of only two west-facing heat-absorbing
      > features in my house. I did plant a small lace-bark elm between the windowed
      > door and the sun's most direct summer arc, but the soil isn't great there and
      > the poor little things struggling to survive, much less grow into a great shade
      > tree to keep the sun from baking the door and sending its rays on into the
      > house.
      > >
      > > So I wonder what you guys would do? Would you sacrifice the light and go with
      > a solid door? Put another windowed door in and put solar reflective film on it?
      > Rip out the small tree and plant something more substantial? Are there options
      > I'm not considering that come to mind? We hardly ever use our electric heat
      > system and so I'm not at all concerned about maintaining the ability to gain
      > heat from it in the winter months (the two days of winter we have here) but I
      > would hate to lose the natural light.
      > >
      > > Suggestions?
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > Susan
      > >
      >
    • Scarsella, Thomas M. (JSC-IC8)[DB Consult
      I d go with another door with a double-paned window. We replaced an old wooden, South-facing, door with one of the newer energy-efficient ones and the inside
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 14, 2011
      • 0 Attachment

        I’d go with another door with a double-paned window.  We replaced an old wooden, South-facing, door with one of the newer energy-efficient ones and the inside of the new one is cool to the touch where the old solid one was not.  I don’t think you have to choose between light and energy efficiency.

         

         

        From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of SusanD
        Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2011 12:30 AM
        To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [hreg] Re: West-facing window heat gain issue

         

         

        P.S.: I had a west-facing door with internal operable blinds encased between the glasses at this same property and the blinds did not operate well during the heat of the day due to their expansion within the glass, so I have nixed that idea pretty much.

        --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "SusanD" <texasblessings@...> wrote:
        >
        > I wonder if any of you can offer suggestions:
        >
        > I have a 36" X 80" west-facing exterior door that goes out of my laundry room to my solar & wind powered clothes dryer (AKA my clothesline)is located. The door has a very large gas-filled double paned glass window in it and the laundry room would be very dark without the provided natural light. The door was salvaged out of a UT remodel and I purchased it through the Habitat for Humanity restore several years back, but it has seen better days and has a large area of rot, and I need to replace it. It is one of only two west-facing heat-absorbing features in my house. I did plant a small lace-bark elm between the windowed door and the sun's most direct summer arc, but the soil isn't great there and the poor little things struggling to survive, much less grow into a great shade tree to keep the sun from baking the door and sending its rays on into the house.
        >
        > So I wonder what you guys would do? Would you sacrifice the light and go with a solid door? Put another windowed door in and put solar reflective film on it? Rip out the small tree and plant something more substantial? Are there options I'm not considering that come to mind? We hardly ever use our electric heat system and so I'm not at all concerned about maintaining the ability to gain heat from it in the winter months (the two days of winter we have here) but I would hate to lose the natural light.
        >
        > Suggestions?
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Susan
        >

      • Gino Griego
        If your budget is a concern, try a heavy drape/curtain in front of the door to establish a thermal barrier between the door and the inside. The low e doors are
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 14, 2011
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          If your budget is a concern, try a heavy drape/curtain in front of the door to establish a thermal barrier between the door and the inside. The low e doors are great, however the return on investment Will be measured in decades not years.  

          Thanks,

          Gino

          Sent from my iPhone

          On Jul 14, 2011, at 14:05, "Scarsella, Thomas M. (JSC-IC8)[DB Consulting Group, Inc.]"<Thomas.m.scarsella@...> wrote:

           

          I’d go with another door with a double-paned window.  We replaced an old wooden, South-facing, door with one of the newer energy-efficient ones and the inside of the new one is cool to the touch where the old solid one was not.  I don’t think you have to choose between light and energy efficiency.

           

           

          From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of SusanD
          Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2011 12:30 AM
          To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [hreg] Re: West-facing window heat gain issue

           

           

          P.S.: I had a west-facing door with internal operable blinds encased between the glasses at this same property and the blinds did not operate well during the heat of the day due to their expansion within the glass, so I have nixed that idea pretty much.

          --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "SusanD" <texasblessings@...> wrote:
          >
          > I wonder if any of you can offer suggestions:
          >
          > I have a 36" X 80" west-facing exterior door that goes out of my laundry room to my solar & wind powered clothes dryer (AKA my clothesline)is located. The door has a very large gas-filled double paned glass window in it and the laundry room would be very dark without the provided natural light. The door was salvaged out of a UT remodel and I purchased it through the Habitat for Humanity restore several years back, but it has seen better days and has a large area of rot, and I need to replace it. It is one of only two west-facing heat-absorbing features in my house. I did plant a small lace-bark elm between the windowed door and the sun's most direct summer arc, but the soil isn't great there and the poor little things struggling to survive, much less grow into a great shade tree to keep the sun from baking the door and sending its rays on into the house.
          >
          > So I wonder what you guys would do? Would you sacrifice the light and go with a solid door? Put another windowed door in and put solar reflective film on it? Rip out the small tree and plant something more substantial? Are there options I'm not considering that come to mind? We hardly ever use our electric heat system and so I'm not at all concerned about maintaining the ability to gain heat from it in the winter months (the two days of winter we have here) but I would hate to lose the natural light.
          >
          > Suggestions?
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Susan
          >

        • Scarsella, Thomas M. (JSC-IC8)[DB Consult
          True but the benefits are substantial. Our e-door lets in more light and is better insulated certainly but it is also much quieter inside than it used to be
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 14, 2011
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            True but the benefits are substantial.   Our e-door lets in more light and is better insulated certainly but it is also much quieter inside than it used to be with the new which is quite solid.  The glass survived being pelted by wind-blown debris during Ike and it would be very hard to break down.  We feel like we got a lot for what we paid though I know the other benefits are somewhat off-topic.

             

            From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gino Griego
            Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2011 2:12 PM
            To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [hreg] Re: West-facing window heat gain issue

             

             

            If your budget is a concern, try a heavy drape/curtain in front of the door to establish a thermal barrier between the door and the inside. The low e doors are great, however the return on investment Will be measured in decades not years.  

            Thanks,

             

            Gino

             

            Sent from my iPhone


            On Jul 14, 2011, at 14:05, "Scarsella, Thomas M. (JSC-IC8)[DB Consulting Group, Inc.]"<Thomas.m.scarsella@...> wrote:

             

            I’d go with another door with a double-paned window.  We replaced an old wooden, South-facing, door with one of the newer energy-efficient ones and the inside of the new one is cool to the touch where the old solid one was not.  I don’t think you have to choose between light and energy efficiency.

             

             

            From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of SusanD
            Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2011 12:30 AM
            To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [hreg] Re: West-facing window heat gain issue

             

             

            P.S.: I had a west-facing door with internal operable blinds encased between the glasses at this same property and the blinds did not operate well during the heat of the day due to their expansion within the glass, so I have nixed that idea pretty much.

            --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, "SusanD" <texasblessings@...> wrote:
            >
            > I wonder if any of you can offer suggestions:
            >
            > I have a 36" X 80" west-facing exterior door that goes out of my laundry room to my solar & wind powered clothes dryer (AKA my clothesline)is located. The door has a very large gas-filled double paned glass window in it and the laundry room would be very dark without the provided natural light. The door was salvaged out of a UT remodel and I purchased it through the Habitat for Humanity restore several years back, but it has seen better days and has a large area of rot, and I need to replace it. It is one of only two west-facing heat-absorbing features in my house. I did plant a small lace-bark elm between the windowed door and the sun's most direct summer arc, but the soil isn't great there and the poor little things struggling to survive, much less grow into a great shade tree to keep the sun from baking the door and sending its rays on into the house.
            >
            > So I wonder what you guys would do? Would you sacrifice the light and go with a solid door? Put another windowed door in and put solar reflective film on it? Rip out the small tree and plant something more substantial? Are there options I'm not considering that come to mind? We hardly ever use our electric heat system and so I'm not at all concerned about maintaining the ability to gain heat from it in the winter months (the two days of winter we have here) but I would hate to lose the natural light.
            >
            > Suggestions?
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Susan
            >

          • Roy Holder
            A good insulated door with smaller glass will do just fine. The height of the glass is more important than the area, so a narrow tall window will give very
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 14, 2011
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              A good insulated door with smaller glass will do just fine.
              The height of the glass is more important than the area, so a narrow tall
              window will give very good ilumination, while reducing solar gain. It is
              not a standard stock item at home depot, you would need someone to make it
              custom for you.
              If you dont need view you could look at adding a glass transom above the
              door.
              All you would need is about 6 to 8 inches clear of glass vertially to give
              illumination equal to a 1/2 door glass insert. If the house is 1 story and
              the roof overhangs the door, you could use clear glazing because the roof
              overhang would protect the glass from all but the lowest sun.

              An option is an exterior vertical shade device. A rough sawn cedar frame
              with solar screen material will do an excellent job of reducing afternoon
              sun. Its placement would be important so as not to greatly reduce daylight
              gain too.

              If you just use a regular door with a regular window in it (home depot type
              stock item), I would add a 3M low E film called E-1235 to the glass. This
              film silvers a little in low light but reduces most solar gain(and 99%+ UV)
              but still lets a lot of visible light in. Last time I used it the material
              was less than 4$ a square foot.




              At 05:30 AM 7/14/2011 -0000, you wrote:
              > P.S.: I had a west-facing
              >door with internal operable blinds encased between the glasses at this same
              >property and the blinds did not operate well during the heat of the day due
              >to their expansion within the glass, so I have nixed that idea pretty much.
              >
              > --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com""<> wrote:
              >>
              >> I wonder if any of you can offer suggestions:
              >>
              >>""& wind powered clothes dryer (AKA my clothesline)is located. The door
              >has a very large gas-filled double paned glass window in it and the laundry
              >room would be very dark without the provided natural light. The door was
              >salvaged out of a UT remodel and I purchased it through the Habitat for
              >Humanity restore several years back, but it has seen better days and has a
              >large area of rot, and I need to replace it. It is one of only two
              >west-facing heat-absorbing features in my house. I did plant a small
              >lace-bark elm between the windowed door and the sun's most direct summer
              >arc, but the soil isn't great there and the poor little things struggling
              >to survive, much less grow into a great shade tree to keep the sun from
              >baking the door and sending its rays on into the house.
              >>
              >> So I wonder what you guys would do? Would you sacrifice the light and go
              >with a solid door? Put another windowed door in and put solar reflective
              >film on it? Rip out the small tree and plant something more substantial?
              >Are there options I'm not considering that come to mind? We hardly ever
              >use our electric heat system and so I'm not at all concerned about
              >maintaining the ability to gain heat from it in the winter months (the two
              >days of winter we have here) but I would hate to lose the natural light.
              >>
              >> Suggestions?
              >>
              >> Thanks,
              >> Susan
              >>
              >
              > No virus found in this message.
              > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              > Version: 10.0.1390 / Virus Database: 1516/3763 - Release Date: 07/13/11
              Roy Holder, AIA

              L.M. Holder III, FAIA
              Architects - Planners - Energy Consultants
              4202 Spicewood Springs Rd., Suite 214
              Austin, Texas 78759
              P.512.345.8817 ext.24
              F.512.345.2143 - M.512-422-0908

              www.holder3.com
            • Eileen Nehiley
              My experience with energy efficient & aesthetically pleasing exterior doors for 2/3 the cost of Home Depot or Lowe s or BMC: Bison Builders is a great
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 14, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                My experience with energy efficient & aesthetically pleasing exterior doors for 2/3 the cost of Home Depot or Lowe's or BMC:
                Bison Builders is a great economical place to get custom doors. I found much better selection for lower price & custom. 
                It was a win - win for me. Custom side lights with double pane glass on either side of the beveled glass plus a special ordered fiberglass door - about 2/3 of what I'd have paid for something available at hardware stores that I didn't like.

                Eileen

                On Jul 14, 2011, at 2:28 PM, Roy Holder wrote:

                 

                A good insulated door with smaller glass will do just fine.
                The height of the glass is more important than the area, so a narrow tall
                window will give very good ilumination, while reducing solar gain. It is
                not a standard stock item at home depot, you would need someone to make it
                custom for you.
                If you dont need view you could look at adding a glass transom above the
                door.
                All you would need is about 6 to 8 inches clear of glass vertially to give
                illumination equal to a 1/2 door glass insert. If the house is 1 story and
                the roof overhangs the door, you could use clear glazing because the roof
                overhang would protect the glass from all but the lowest sun.

                An option is an exterior vertical shade device. A rough sawn cedar frame
                with solar screen material will do an excellent job of reducing afternoon
                sun. Its placement would be important so as not to greatly reduce daylight
                gain too.

                If you just use a regular door with a regular window in it (home depot type
                stock item), I would add a 3M low E film called E-1235 to the glass. This
                film silvers a little in low light but reduces most solar gain(and 99%+ UV)
                but still lets a lot of visible light in. Last time I used it the material
                was less than 4$ a square foot.

                At 05:30 AM 7/14/2011 -0000, you wrote:
                > P.S.: I had a west-facing
                >door with internal operable blinds encased between the glasses at this same
                >property and the blinds did not operate well during the heat of the day due
                >to their expansion within the glass, so I have nixed that idea pretty much.
                >
                > --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com""<> wrote:
                >>
                >> I wonder if any of you can offer suggestions:
                >>
                >>""& wind powered clothes dryer (AKA my clothesline)is located. The door
                >has a very large gas-filled double paned glass window in it and the laundry
                >room would be very dark without the provided natural light. The door was
                >salvaged out of a UT remodel and I purchased it through the Habitat for
                >Humanity restore several years back, but it has seen better days and has a
                >large area of rot, and I need to replace it. It is one of only two
                >west-facing heat-absorbing features in my house. I did plant a small
                >lace-bark elm between the windowed door and the sun's most direct summer
                >arc, but the soil isn't great there and the poor little things struggling
                >to survive, much less grow into a great shade tree to keep the sun from
                >baking the door and sending its rays on into the house.
                >>
                >> So I wonder what you guys would do? Would you sacrifice the light and go
                >with a solid door? Put another windowed door in and put solar reflective
                >film on it? Rip out the small tree and plant something more substantial?
                >Are there options I'm not considering that come to mind? We hardly ever
                >use our electric heat system and so I'm not at all concerned about
                >maintaining the ability to gain heat from it in the winter months (the two
                >days of winter we have here) but I would hate to lose the natural light.
                >>
                >> Suggestions?
                >>
                >> Thanks,
                >> Susan
                >>
                >
                > No virus found in this message.
                > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                > Version: 10.0.1390 / Virus Database: 1516/3763 - Release Date: 07/13/11
                Roy Holder, AIA

                L.M. Holder III, FAIA
                Architects - Planners - Energy Consultants
                4202 Spicewood Springs Rd., Suite 214
                Austin, Texas 78759
                P.512.345.8817 ext.24
                F.512.345.2143 - M.512-422-0908

                www.holder3.com


              • betina wolfowicz
                Thanks for the tip Eileen, is Bison on the web? ________________________________ From: Eileen Nehiley To: hreg@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 15, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Thanks for the tip Eileen, is Bison on the web?


                  From: Eileen Nehiley <enehiley@...>
                  To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2011 7:07 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Spam] [hreg] Re: West-facing window heat gain issue

                   
                  My experience with energy efficient & aesthetically pleasing exterior doors for 2/3 the cost of Home Depot or Lowe's or BMC:
                  Bison Builders is a great economical place to get custom doors. I found much better selection for lower price & custom. 
                  It was a win - win for me. Custom side lights with double pane glass on either side of the beveled glass plus a special ordered fiberglass door - about 2/3 of what I'd have paid for something available at hardware stores that I didn't like.

                  Eileen

                  On Jul 14, 2011, at 2:28 PM, Roy Holder wrote:

                   
                  A good insulated door with smaller glass will do just fine.
                  The height of the glass is more important than the area, so a narrow tall
                  window will give very good ilumination, while reducing solar gain. It is
                  not a standard stock item at home depot, you would need someone to make it
                  custom for you.
                  If you dont need view you could look at adding a glass transom above the
                  door.
                  All you would need is about 6 to 8 inches clear of glass vertially to give
                  illumination equal to a 1/2 door glass insert. If the house is 1 story and
                  the roof overhangs the door, you could use clear glazing because the roof
                  overhang would protect the glass from all but the lowest sun.

                  An option is an exterior vertical shade device. A rough sawn cedar frame
                  with solar screen material will do an excellent job of reducing afternoon
                  sun. Its placement would be important so as not to greatly reduce daylight
                  gain too.

                  If you just use a regular door with a regular window in it (home depot type
                  stock item), I would add a 3M low E film called E-1235 to the glass. This
                  film silvers a little in low light but reduces most solar gain(and 99%+ UV)
                  but still lets a lot of visible light in. Last time I used it the material
                  was less than 4$ a square foot.

                  At 05:30 AM 7/14/2011 -0000, you wrote:
                  > P.S.: I had a west-facing
                  >door with internal operable blinds encased between the glasses at this same
                  >property and the blinds did not operate well during the heat of the day due
                  >to their expansion within the glass, so I have nixed that idea pretty much.
                  >
                  > --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com""<> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> I wonder if any of you can offer suggestions:
                  >>
                  >>""& wind powered clothes dryer (AKA my clothesline)is located. The door
                  >has a very large gas-filled double paned glass window in it and the laundry
                  >room would be very dark without the provided natural light. The door was
                  >salvaged out of a UT remodel and I purchased it through the Habitat for
                  >Humanity restore several years back, but it has seen better days and has a
                  >large area of rot, and I need to replace it. It is one of only two
                  >west-facing heat-absorbing features in my house. I did plant a small
                  >lace-bark elm between the windowed door and the sun's most direct summer
                  >arc, but the soil isn't great there and the poor little things struggling
                  >to survive, much less grow into a great shade tree to keep the sun from
                  >baking the door and sending its rays on into the house.
                  >>
                  >> So I wonder what you guys would do? Would you sacrifice the light and go
                  >with a solid door? Put another windowed door in and put solar reflective
                  >film on it? Rip out the small tree and plant something more substantial?
                  >Are there options I'm not considering that come to mind? We hardly ever
                  >use our electric heat system and so I'm not at all concerned about
                  >maintaining the ability to gain heat from it in the winter months (the two
                  >days of winter we have here) but I would hate to lose the natural light.
                  >>
                  >> Suggestions?
                  >>
                  >> Thanks,
                  >> Susan
                  >>
                  >
                  > No virus found in this message.
                  > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  > Version: 10.0.1390 / Virus Database: 1516/3763 - Release Date: 07/13/11
                  Roy Holder, AIA

                  L.M. Holder III, FAIA
                  Architects - Planners - Energy Consultants
                  4202 Spicewood Springs Rd., Suite 214
                  Austin, Texas 78759
                  P.512.345.8817 ext.24
                  F.512.345.2143 - M.512-422-0908

                  www.holder3.com




                • SusanD
                  Thanks to each of you for your suggestions! I tracked Bison down and managed to get transferred to Dave in the retail/millworks department and though they do
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jul 15, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thanks to each of you for your suggestions!

                    I tracked Bison down and managed to get transferred to "Dave" in the retail/millworks department and though they do offer a good selection of custom doors for very reasonable prices, he said they don't offer anything in the way of energy efficiency, do gas filled of high-E glazing, but just standard two-paned regular glazed glass, so I'm still searching.

                    --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com, betina wolfowicz <bwolfowicz@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks for the tip Eileen, is Bison on the web?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: Eileen Nehiley <enehiley@...>
                    > To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2011 7:07 PM
                    > Subject: Re: [Spam] [hreg] Re: West-facing window heat gain issue
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    > My experience with energy efficient & aesthetically pleasing exterior doors for 2/3 the cost of Home Depot or Lowe's or BMC:
                    > Bison Builders is a great economical place to get custom doors. I found much better selection for lower price & custom. 
                    > It was a win - win for me. Custom side lights with double pane glass on either side of the beveled glass plus a special ordered fiberglass door - about 2/3 of what I'd have paid for something available at hardware stores that I didn't like.
                    >
                    > Eileen
                    >
                    >
                    > On Jul 14, 2011, at 2:28 PM, Roy Holder wrote:
                    >
                    >  
                    > >A good insulated door with smaller glass will do just fine.
                    > >The height of the glass is more important than the area, so a narrow tall
                    > >window will give very good ilumination, while reducing solar gain. It is
                    > >not a standard stock item at home depot, you would need someone to make it
                    > >custom for you.
                    > >If you dont need view you could look at adding a glass transom above the
                    > >door.
                    > >All you would need is about 6 to 8 inches clear of glass vertially to give
                    > >illumination equal to a 1/2 door glass insert. If the house is 1 story and
                    > >the roof overhangs the door, you could use clear glazing because the roof
                    > >overhang would protect the glass from all but the lowest sun.
                    > >
                    > >An option is an exterior vertical shade device. A rough sawn cedar frame
                    > >with solar screen material will do an excellent job of reducing afternoon
                    > >sun. Its placement would be important so as not to greatly reduce daylight
                    > >gain too.
                    > >
                    > >If you just use a regular door with a regular window in it (home depot type
                    > >stock item), I would add a 3M low E film called E-1235 to the glass. This
                    > >film silvers a little in low light but reduces most solar gain(and 99%+ UV)
                    > >but still lets a lot of visible light in. Last time I used it the material
                    > >was less than 4$ a square foot.
                    > >
                    > >At 05:30 AM 7/14/2011 -0000, you wrote:
                    > >> P.S.: I had a west-facing
                    > >>door with internal operable blinds encased between the glasses at this same
                    > >>property and the blinds did not operate well during the heat of the day due
                    > >>to their expansion within the glass, so I have nixed that idea pretty much.
                    > >>
                    > >> --- In hreg@yahoogroups.com""<> wrote:
                    > >>>
                    > >>> I wonder if any of you can offer suggestions:
                    > >>>
                    > >>>""& wind powered clothes dryer (AKA my clothesline)is located. The door
                    > >>has a very large gas-filled double paned glass window in it and the laundry
                    > >>room would be very dark without the provided natural light. The door was
                    > >>salvaged out of a UT remodel and I purchased it through the Habitat for
                    > >>Humanity restore several years back, but it has seen better days and has a
                    > >>large area of rot, and I need to replace it. It is one of only two
                    > >>west-facing heat-absorbing features in my house. I did plant a small
                    > >>lace-bark elm between the windowed door and the sun's most direct summer
                    > >>arc, but the soil isn't great there and the poor little things struggling
                    > >>to survive, much less grow into a great shade tree to keep the sun from
                    > >>baking the door and sending its rays on into the house.
                    > >>>
                    > >>> So I wonder what you guys would do? Would you sacrifice the light and go
                    > >>with a solid door? Put another windowed door in and put solar reflective
                    > >>film on it? Rip out the small tree and plant something more substantial?
                    > >>Are there options I'm not considering that come to mind? We hardly ever
                    > >>use our electric heat system and so I'm not at all concerned about
                    > >>maintaining the ability to gain heat from it in the winter months (the two
                    > >>days of winter we have here) but I would hate to lose the natural light.
                    > >>>
                    > >>> Suggestions?
                    > >>>
                    > >>> Thanks,
                    > >>> Susan
                    > >>>
                    > >>
                    > >> No virus found in this message.
                    > >> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                    > >> Version: 10.0.1390 / Virus Database: 1516/3763 - Release Date: 07/13/11
                    > >Roy Holder, AIA
                    > >
                    > >L.M. Holder III, FAIA
                    > >Architects - Planners - Energy Consultants
                    > >4202 Spicewood Springs Rd., Suite 214
                    > >Austin, Texas 78759
                    > >P.512.345.8817 ext.24
                    > >F.512.345.2143 - M.512-422-0908
                    > >
                    > >www.holder3.com
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Roy Holder
                    you can oeder it without the glass and have a local glass company make and install the low e glass you want ... Roy Holder, AIA L.M. Holder III, FAIA
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jul 15, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      you can oeder it without the glass and have a local glass company make and
                      install the low e glass you want


                      At 06:48 PM 7/15/2011 -0000, you wrote:
                      > Thanks to each of you for
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >youruggestions!
                      >
                      >"" in the retail/millworks department and
                      >though
                      >they
                      >do offer a good
                      >selection of custom doors for very reonable
                      >prices,
                      >he
                      >said they don't
                      >offer anything in the way of energy effiency,
                      >do
                      >gas
                      >filled of high-E
                      >glazing, but just standard two-paned
                      >regular
                      >glazed
                      >glass, so I'm still
                      >searching.
                      >
                      > ---
                      >In
                      >hreg@yahoogroups.com<>
                      >wrote:
                      >>
                      >> Thanks for the tip Eileen, is
                      >Bison on
                      >the web?
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >________________________________
                      >><>
                      >>
                      >To:
                      >hreg@yahoogroups.com
                      >> Sent:
                      >Thursday, July 14, 2011 7:07 PM
                      >>
                      >Subject:
                      >Re: [Spam] [hreg] Re:
                      >West-facing window heat gain issue
                      >>
                      >>
                      >
                      >>  
                      >
                      >>& aesthetically
                      >pleasing exterior doors for 2/3 the cost of
                      >Home Depot
                      >or
                      >Lowe's or
                      >BMC:
                      >>& custom. 
                      >> It was a win - win for me.
                      >Custom side
                      >lights with
                      >double pane glass on
                      >either side of the beveled
                      >glass plus a
                      >special
                      >ordered fiberglass door -
                      >about 2/3 of what I'd
                      >have paid for
                      >something
                      >available at hardware stores
                      >that I didn't
                      >like.
                      >>
                      >>
                      >Eileen
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >On Jul 14, 2011, at 2:28 PM, Roy Holder
                      >wrote:
                      >>
                      >>  
                      >
                      >>>A good
                      >insulated door with smaller glass will do
                      >just fine.
                      >>>The
                      >height of the
                      >glass is more important than the area, so
                      >a narrow
                      >tall
                      >>>window will give
                      >very good ilumination, while reducing
                      >solar gain.
                      > It is
                      >>>not a standard
                      >stock item at home depot, you would
                      >need someone
                      >to make it
                      >>>custom for
                      >you.
                      >>>If you dont need view you
                      >could look at
                      >adding a glass transom
                      >above the
                      >>>door.
                      >>>All you would
                      >need is about
                      >6 to 8 inches clear of
                      >glass vertially to
                      >give
                      >>>illumination equal to a
                      >1/2 door glass insert.
                      >If the house is 1
                      >story and
                      >>>the roof overhangs
                      >the door, you could use
                      >clear glazing
                      >because the roof
                      >>>overhang would
                      >protect the glass from all
                      >but the
                      >lowest sun.
                      >>>
                      >>>An option is an
                      >exterior vertical shade device.
                      >A
                      >rough sawn cedar frame
                      >>>with solar
                      >screen material will do an
                      >excellent
                      >job of reducing afternoon
                      >>>sun. Its
                      >placement would be
                      >important so as
                      >not to greatly reduce daylight
                      >>>gain
                      >too.
                      >>>
                      >>>If you
                      >just use a
                      >regular door with a regular window in it
                      >(home depot
                      >type
                      >>>stock item), I
                      >would add a 3M low E film called E-1235
                      >to the
                      >glass. This
                      >>>film silvers
                      >a little in low light but reduces most
                      >solar
                      >gain(and 99%+ UV)
                      >>>but still
                      >lets a lot of visible light in. Last
                      >time
                      >I used it the material
                      >>>was
                      >less than 4$ a square foot.
                      >>>
                      >>>At
                      >05:30
                      >AM 7/14/2011 -0000, you
                      >wrote:
                      >>>>
                      >
                      > P.S.: I had a
                      >west-facing
                      >>>>door with internal
                      >operable
                      >blinds encased between the
                      >glasses at this same
                      >>>>property and
                      >the
                      >blinds did not operate well
                      >during the heat of the day due
                      >>>>to
                      >their
                      >expansion within the glass, so
                      >I have nixed that idea pretty
                      >much.
                      >>>>
                      >
                      >>>> --- In
                      >hreg@yahoogroups.com""<> wrote:
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> I
                      >wonder if any
                      >of you can
                      >offer suggestions:
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>>""& wind powered
                      >clothes dryer
                      >(AKA my
                      >clothesline)is located. The door
                      >>>>has a very
                      >large gas-filled
                      >double
                      >paned glass window in it and the laundry
                      >>>>room
                      >would be very
                      >dark
                      >without the provided natural light. The door
                      >was
                      >>>>salvaged out of
                      >a UT
                      >remodel and I purchased it through the
                      >Habitat for
                      >>>>Humanity
                      >restore
                      >several years back, but it has seen
                      >better days and has
                      >a
                      >>>>large area of
                      >rot, and I need to replace it.
                      >It is one of only
                      >two
                      >>>>west-facing
                      >heat-absorbing features in my
                      >house. I did plant a
                      >small
                      >>>>lace-bark elm
                      >between the windowed door
                      >and the sun's most
                      >direct summer
                      >>>>arc, but the
                      >soil isn't great there
                      >and the poor little
                      >things struggling
                      >>>>to
                      >survive, much less grow into
                      >a great shade tree
                      >to keep the sun
                      >from
                      >>>>baking the door and sending
                      >its rays on into the
                      >house.
                      >>>>>
                      >
                      >>>>> So I wonder what you guys would
                      >do? Would you
                      >sacrifice the light
                      >and go
                      >>>>with a solid door? Put
                      >another windowed
                      >door in and put solar
                      >reflective
                      >>>>film on it? Rip
                      >out the small tree
                      >and plant something more
                      >substantial?
                      >>>>Are there
                      >options I'm not
                      >considering that come to mind?
                      >We hardly ever
                      >>>>use
                      >our electric heat
                      >system and so I'm not at all
                      >concerned
                      >about
                      >>>>maintaining the ability
                      >to gain heat from it in the
                      >winter
                      >months (the two
                      >>>>days of winter we
                      >have here) but I would hate to
                      >lose
                      >the natural light.
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>>
                      >Suggestions?
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>>
                      >Thanks,
                      >>>>>
                      >Susan
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      > No
                      >virus found in
                      >this message.
                      >>>> Checked by AVG -
                      >www.avg.com
                      >>>>
                      >Version: 10.0.1390 /
                      >Virus Database: 1516/3763 - Release
                      >Date: 07/13/11
                      >
                      >>>Roy Holder,
                      >AIA
                      >>>
                      >>>L.M. Holder III,
                      >FAIA
                      >>>Architects - Planners -
                      >Energy
                      >Consultants
                      >>>4202 Spicewood
                      >Springs Rd., Suite 214
                      >>>Austin,
                      >Texas 78759
                      >>>P.512.345.8817
                      >ext.24
                      >>>F.512.345.2143 -
                      >
                      >M.512-422-0908
                      >>>
                      >>>www.holder3.com
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > No virus found in this message.
                      > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                      > Version: 10.0.1390 / Virus Database: 1516/3766 - Release Date: 07/15/11
                      Roy Holder, AIA

                      L.M. Holder III, FAIA
                      Architects - Planners - Energy Consultants
                      4202 Spicewood Springs Rd., Suite 214
                      Austin, Texas 78759
                      P.512.345.8817 ext.24
                      F.512.345.2143 - M.512-422-0908

                      www.holder3.com
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