Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [hreg] See this piece of engineering! A New Engine

Expand Messages
  • wrpretired@aol.com
    I was testing such an engine connected to an electric power generator back in 1964 while serving as a U. S. Marine. The diesel engine and generator were very
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 16, 2011
      I was testing such an engine connected to an electric power generator back in 1964 while serving as a U. S. Marine.  The diesel engine and generator were very portable due to its light weight and small size for the power it generated.  Unfortunately, the engine burned up due to neglect.  It required someone to constantly monitor the oil injection system as it was a 2-cycle engine.  A short period of taking care of other duties while on maneuvers allowed the engine to use all its lubricating oil, which was injected on each power stroke instead of mixing oil with the gasoline as is normal with such as chain saws.  The pistons froze up and generating capability was lost.
       
      Although the engine concept is not new, the engineering to make it reliable probably is.
       
      Semper fi.



      -----Original Message-----
      From: J P Malone <JPMALONE@...>
      To: J P Malone <jpmalone@...>
      Sent: Fri, Feb 25, 2011 6:50 pm
      Subject: [hreg] See this piece of engineering! A New Engine

       
       
      http://images.hemmings.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/OJohnColetti_800-700x474.jpg
      This is no wimp engine.  
      It's a two cylinder with four pistons delivering 300+ Horse Power
      It's extremely small and very efficient and is presently in use in test applications 
      The configuration below is equivalent to a extremely ballsy four cylinder engine 
      When doubled, it's an extremely ballsy 600+ H.P. engine
      http://images.hemmings.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/OPOC_600.jpg
       It’s called OPOC (Opposed Piston Opposed Cylinder), and it’s a turbocharged two-stroke, two-cylinder, with four pistons, two in each cylinder, that will run on gasoline, diesel or ethanol. The two pistons, inside a single cylinder, pump toward and away from each other, thus allowing a cycle to be completed twice as quickly as a conventional engine while balancing its own loads.
      The heavy lifting for this unconventional concept was performed Prof. Peter Hofbauer. During his 20 years at VW, Hofbauer headed up, among other things, development of VW’s first diesel engine and the VR6.
      The OPOC has been in development for several years, and the company claims it’s 30 percent lighter, one quarter the size and achieves 50 percent better fuel economy than a conventional turbo diesel engine.
      They’re predicting 100 MPG in a conventional car. For a good demo, See:   http://www.engineeringtv.com/video/Opposed-Piston-Opposed-Cylinder 
       
       
       
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.