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David Suzuki and Cdn Lung Assoc. urge going fragrance-free

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  • Garth & Kim Travis
    Greetings, This just came in on my immune list, now, how do we get Texas to get the message. Bright Blessings, Kim All of our hard work with these
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 17, 2011
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      Greetings,
      This just came in on my immune list, now, how do we get Texas to get the
      message.
      Bright Blessings,
      Kim


      All of our hard work with these organizations is paying off!

      [Please see the site for the full article and links to other info.]

      David Suzuki Foundation in partnership with the Canadian Lung Association
      http://www.davidsuzuki.org/what-you-can-do/go-fragrance-free/

      Join the growing movement for fragrance-free homes and workplaces!
      Removing unnecessary scented products from where you live and work can
      be beneficial for your health, the health of those around you, and the
      environment. Read on for tips on how to go fragrance-free at work and at
      home.

      For the past few decades, companies and advertisers have done an
      impressive job of casting a romantic light on perfumes and colognes. And
      we now live in an age where you can buy scented air fresheners that
      instantly make your car smell like a pine forest and candles that can
      make your living room smell like a big bowl of potpourri. What isn't
      disclosed on the tidy billboards and romantic TV commercials are the
      hundreds of potentially harmful chemicals that are used to provide these
      scents.

      What does "fragrance" really mean?

      The vast universe of fragranced consumer products includes the obvious
      scented products like colognes, perfumes, and air fresheners. But it
      also includes countless body products (e.g., shampoos, conditioners,
      lotions, deodorants), cleaners, candles, laundry detergents, and more.
      Each product can contain dozens or even hundreds of fragrance-related
      chemicals, but companies are not required to provide this information to
      consumers.

      In the case of cosmetics, the generic term parfum or fragrance on the
      ingredient list can represent a complex cocktail of chemicals. "Parfum"
      was the most commonly reported ingredient in the David Suzuki
      Foundation's 2010 cosmetics survey and can be found in nearly every type
      of personal care product.

      Even products labelled as "unscented" and "fragrance-free" may contain
      masking agents — that is, fragrance chemicals that hide odours (source:
      Health Canada).

      Please see site for full article:
      http://www.davidsuzuki.org/what-you-can-do/go-fragrance-free/
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