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RE: [hreg] Re: Using Hemp - Thanks - unrelated Airflow question

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  • Ed Sarlls
    Here are a few sources. Books on the subject tend to be expensive but there should be enough references from the government and universities to keep her busy.
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 20, 2010

      Here are a few sources. Books on the subject tend to be expensive but there should be enough references from the government and universities to keep her busy. Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning, HVAC, is the general area. Check the Mechanical Engineering and Architecture departments at the universities. Computational Fluid Dynamics is applicable if you have a 3D model of the area of interest and a lot of computing power, see the last report. I just searched “airflow in buildings” and got over a million hits. Model studies with dye or smoke were used before computer models.

       

      Flow visualization is another area to check.

       

      Best wishes to your daughter, she should enjoy her career.

      Ed

       

      http://arch.ced.berkeley.edu/vitalsigns/res/downloads/rp/airflow/HEER1-BG.PDF

       

      http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/tools_directory/subjects.cfm/pagename=subjects/pagename_menu=other_applications/pagename_submenu=ventilation_airflow

       

      http://epb.lbl.gov/comis/

       

      http://www.iawe.org/Proceedings/11ACWE/11ACWE-Meroney.pdf

       

       

      From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrea Wisner
      Sent: Monday, December 20, 2010 4:16 PM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: Using Hemp - Thanks - unrelated Airflow question

       

       

      Wow, you are awesome! I've developed an abiding interest in materials (especially natural and easily-obtained materials) so I'm starting to save websites like this.

       

      If I may ask another question - which area of engineering is most closely-tied to studying airflow in buildings? My daughter is finishing up her civil engineering degree and doesn't seem to know that much about it. If anyone knows of good books and/or online materials on this subject, please post.

       

      Thanks,

      Andrea

      --- On Sat, 12/18/10, Ed Sarlls <edsarlls@...> wrote:


      From: Ed Sarlls <edsarlls@...>
      Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: Using Hemp to build homes
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, December 18, 2010, 5:56 PM

       

      Young's modulus
      (GPa)

      Density
      (kg/m3)

      Strength
      (MPa)

      Cotton

      7.9

      1,540

      225

      Hemp

      32

      1,490

      300

      Bulk Polyester

      2.9

      1,300

      50

      Bulk Nylon

      2.5

      1,090

      63

      Carbon Fibre

      300

      1,770

      3,430

      Aramid Fibre

      124

      1,450

      3,930

      Polyester Fibre

      13.2

      1,390

      784

      Nylon Fibre

      3.9

      1,140

      616

      Alloy Steel

      210

      7,800

      1,330

       

      http://www-materials.eng.cam.ac.uk/mpsite/short/OCR/ropes/default.html

       

      Ed

       

      From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrea Wisner
      Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2010 1:53 PM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: Using Hemp to build homes

       

       

      What I want to know is - is help really a miracle fiber, or are being just excited about it because they associate in with marijuana in their minds? For every use for hemp, is it the bext possible material for that use, or is it just that it's usable for that purpose? Could anyone recommend an online scientific reference related to the properties of hemp?

       

      Andrea

      --- On Sat, 12/18/10, Ed Sarlls <edsarlls@...> wrote:


      From: Ed Sarlls <edsarlls@...>
      Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: Using Hemp to build homes
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, December 18, 2010, 12:28 PM

       

      Consistent with  Wikipedia

       

      Cannabis sativa L. subsp. sativa var. sativa is the variety grown for industrial use, while C. sativa subsp. indica generally has poor fibre quality and is primarily used for production of recreational and medicinal drugs.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp

       

      Ed

       

      From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tyra Rankin
      Sent: Saturday, December 18, 2010 9:44 AM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [hreg] Re: Using Hemp to build homes

       

       

      The US laws are not just archaic – they were manipulated by powerful paper/wood industry lobbyists who outlawed their competition.  Hemp has so many uses – it’s one of the most multi-use renewable plants around.   My understanding is that Hemp is not a marijuana plant – but a cousin.

      Tyra

       


      From: hreg@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hreg@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of texas.christian
      Sent: Thursday, December 16, 2010 2:55 PM
      To: hreg@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [hreg] Re: Using Hemp to build homes

       

       

      The problem is, people have this misconception that importing hemp will mean that everyone is getting high... but as Ron Paul famously said in his speech in Minneapolis in 2008... "You'd need to smoke a joint the size of a telephone pole." Too bad the folks that make the laws know so little about science.

      > --- On Mon, 12/13/10, Ron Foster <toronfoster@...> wrote:

      The problem is archaic laws here in the US prevent us from importing Hemp. Otherwise, it would be very cheap as well.
      >
      >

       

       

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