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THE MOST INTERESTING MAN/WOMAN IN THE WORLD (issue 63)

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  • The Troubadour
    [Today for Positivity Wednesday we have a special treat. We re bringing to your attention and thusly honoring one of the all-time greats of whom you ve
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 14, 2011
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      [Today for Positivity Wednesday we have a special treat. We're bringing to
      your attention and thusly honoring one of the all-time greats of whom you've
      probably never heard. He is Allan Kirik, a former world-class ultrarunner,
      record-holder, and "hot" idol of countless "chicks" (we're only guessing
      here, of course), and now a hot sales rep for Hot Sox. ;-) (You can judge
      after you've seen his picture, OK?) But once again, today's hero doesn't
      write much that you can view over the Internet, but there are a few places
      where you can read about him. Here, for example, is a blog entry:
      http://runtrails.blogspot.com/2009_12_01_archive.html.
      (But this entry is marred by an error, as is the AUA entry that this blogger
      copied from. Fritz Mueller wasn't even AT THAT 50K CHAMPIONSHIP RACE in
      1977. The AUA got it wrong, and now everybody since then has gotten it
      wrong. We here today, however, got it right. Why? Because we have talked
      to Mr. Kirik himself over the telephone. Apparently no one else has ever
      thought to do that.)
      Allan briefly held the road 50-mile world record in 1979 (before Barney
      Klecker seized it rather emphatically the following year) by running 5:00:30
      at Lake Waramaug in Connecticut. At that time only a precious FEW
      Britishers had ever gone under 5 hours, but they'd done it only on track,
      not on road. Allan regrets to this day slowing down to, yes, TALK to some
      "idiot" casual runner who ran with him prior to the finish line, asking
      questions--which, unfortunately, Allan bothered to answer! Proof, of
      course, that sometimes "nice guys finish first."
      In 2009 he was enshrined in the AUA Hall of Fame:
      http://www.americanultra.org/halloffame.html.
      He's mentioned here (under "Field Notes" for the Workout of 11/27/2001--note
      farther down that webpage is a photo taken on 9/11):
      http://old.centralparktc.org/training/roadwork01.htm.
      And, in what was perhaps his greatest victory, to date he is still the ONLY
      American male ever to win London-to-Brighton:
      http://www.gbrathletics.co.uk/bc/ultra.htm.
      So today he certainly IS our TMIMITW.]



      He is the only tail gunner to emerge successfully from Vietnam and go on to
      "gun" down all leading "tails" in footraces. Unfortunately, in his
      long-distance races there were never any tails in front of him. He was
      always in first place.

      Formerly he could hold a sub-6 minute pace for weeks at a time. Today he
      can only do it for up to 50 miles at a time, forcing himself to rest awhile
      in-between.

      Enduring a lifetime of "just plain bad luck"--Vietnam included--he's a New
      Yorker--and that, too, may be bad luck--who has nevertheless found triumph
      in his later years. Unfortunately, the magazine in which his triumphs are
      reported isn't for sale on any newsstand in New York City.

      He has been known to line up at the front of the New York City Marathon with
      all of the all-time greats, and proceed, after the starting gun (again, a
      gun), to beat them.

      Since he doesn't himself own a gun, he relies on his inherent ability to be
      faster than a speeding bullet.

      He once sold socks to Joan Benoit. They enabled her herself to become hot
      enough to win the inaugural Women's Olympic Marathon in Los Angeles in 1984.

      He considers Ted Corbitt, "the father of ultrarunning," to have been just
      about his closest friend. Ted helped fund-raise the money he needed to fly
      to London to race in 1979. But, of course as it turned out, he was able to
      fly without the airplane. He simply *ran* atop the water across the
      Atlantic at a sub-6 minute pace.

      Witnesses to that crossing swear to this day that his actual pace was closer
      to sub-3 minute miles.

      As a former world-record-holder, he relies on reporters to be intrepid and
      to do their homework. Then, once he trusts them, he guns their tails down,
      too.

      His exploits are currently published in the Sept/Oct issue of "Marathon &
      Beyond" magazine.

      He is THE MOST INTERESTING MAN IN THE WORLD.

      "I don't always out-gun or outrun everyone in the race; but, when I do, I
      prefer not to have to slow down and talk to them. Stay speedy, my friends."



      ( 00 )
      V



      See (and hear) some originals:

      http://dosequis.com/

      Also here:

      http://tinyurl.com/DosEquisAd
      [and thanks to UltraJohn Price--himself no stranger to speed--for supplying
      this instead of that former long and always-broken hyperlink].

      My mark:

      XX
      Rich Limacher
      TheTroubadour@...
      ("your intrepid 800-year-old buzz-tweeting lute-plucking song-and-dance dude
      reporting from--not London but--France")

      Yankee Folly of the Day:
      Imagine any magazine on earth NOT being for sale in New York City.
      Apparently, these days all the newsstands are stocked only with picture
      publications, so that readers no longer even *pretend* to read the articles?
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