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Re: [hr100] Fwd: FW: Visitors to public lands should be aware of livestock protection dog...

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  • Chris Twiggs
    That s because you don t have enough meat on your bones, Matt. Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 17, 2011
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      That's because you don't have enough meat on your bones, Matt.

      Sent from my iPhone

      On Jun 17, 2011, at 7:41 PM, Matt Mahoney <matmahoney@...> wrote:

      > Good advice. A few years ago when I was descending into Cunningham in the dark,
      > I found myself in the middle of a herd of sheep. There was a big dog but it left
      > me alone.
      >
      > -- Matt Mahoney, matmahoney@...
      >
      > >
      > >From: Lois MacKenzie <skunkears@...>
      > >To: group A <hr100@yahoogroups.com>
      > >Sent: Fri, June 17, 2011 9:01:00 PM
      > >Subject: [hr100] Fwd: FW: Visitors to public lands should be aware of livestock
      > >protection dog...
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Any of you who hike in the back county should take note of this!
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >From: Ann Bond
      > >[mailto:abond@...]
      > >Sent: Friday, June 17, 2011 9:36
      > >AM
      > >To: pdl r2 sj pl
      > >Subject: Visitors to public lands
      > >should be aware of livestock protection dogs in the high
      > >country
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >CONTACT: Mark
      > >Tucker, San Juan Public Lands Rangeland Management, 970 385-1369
      > >
      > >
      > >For immediate
      > >release: June 17, 2011
      > >Visitors to public
      > >lands should be aware of livestock protection dogs in the high
      > >country
      > >
      > >
      > >DURANGO -
      > >As
      > >the snow melts in the high country, hikers, backpackers and other visitors
      > >will soon be joining bands of domestic sheep in heading for public lands.
      > > Domestic sheep are grazed on public lands under permit from late June to
      > >early October. A band of sheep is often accompanied by a pair of
      > >livestock protection dogs, which are an effective tool used by ranchers to
      > >protect sheep from predators. These large white guard dogs are often
      > >Great Pyrenees or Akbash breeds.
      > >
      > >The U.S. Forest
      > >Service and Bureau of Land Management will be posting signs along trails and
      > >trailheads notifying users of the dates that domestic sheep bands will be
      > >grazing in certain areas. Follow these safety tips when encountering guard
      > >dogs in the backcountry:
      > >When approaching a
      > >band of sheep, allow time for the guard dogs to see you and determine you are
      > >not a threat. Remain calm. If you do not appear to be a threat, the dogs
      > >will often just watch you pass by.
      > >If you have a dog
      > >with you, it may appear to guard dogs as a threat if it gets too close to the
      > >band or tries to chase sheep. Keep your dog close to you and under control.
      > > Leash your dog for as long as you can see sheep band.
      > >Try not to “split”
      > >the band by walking through it; instead travel around the sheep via the least
      > >disruptive route. Keep as much space as practical between you and the sheep
      > >band, especially if you have a dog with you. As you pass, keep line of
      > >sight between
      > >you, your pets and the guard dogs.
      > >Bicycle riders
      > >should dismount from their bikes and walk past the band with the bike between
      > >you and the livestock protection dog. Do not remount until you are well past
      > >the sheep.
      > >
      > >
      > >Do not:
      > >
      > >
      > >Chase or harass
      > >sheep or livestock protection dogs.
      > >Try to outrun
      > >livestock protection dogs. If a guard dog approaches you, tell it to
      > >“go back to the sheep,” or tell it, “No!” in a firm voice. Do not
      > >attempt to hit or throw things at it.
      > >Attempt to
      > >befriend or feed livestock protection dogs. They are not pets.
      > > They are lean athletic working dogs, which are cared for by their
      > >owners.
      > >Allow your pets
      > >to run towards or harass sheep. They may be perceived as predators by
      > >the livestock protection dog and attacked.
      > >Mistake a
      > >livestock protection dog as lost and take it with you.
      > >
      > >
      > >For more
      > >information or to report an encounter with a livestock protection dog, please
      > >contact the San Juan Public Lands Center at 970 247-4874 or nearest Forest
      > >Service or BLM office.
      > >
      > >
      > >______________________________
      > >
      > >this
      > >msg was sent to you by:
      > >Ann Bond
      > >Public
      > >Affairs Specialist
      > >San Juan Public Lands Center
      > >15 Burnett
      > >Court
      > >Durango, CO 81301
      > >970 385-1219
      > >abond@...
      > >
      > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >


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