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THE MOST INTERESTING MAN IN THE WORLD, Part 2

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  • The Troubadour
    [We have resisted long enough, and suddenly now decide to declare: Positively Wednesdays. Which is designed to offset all the inhumane horribleness of all
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 3, 2010
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      [We have resisted long enough, and suddenly now decide to declare:
      "Positively Wednesdays." Which is designed to offset all the inhumane
      horribleness of all that negative, demeaning, and basic total-FUN-having
      (!!!) at-the-expense-of-idiots which usually takes place on Bad Joke Fridays
      and to which RM/WoG contributes. This, then, is in honor of one of the
      earliest Barkley finishers (with asterisk ;-), truly a legend in his own
      time, who recently celebrated his birthday, and who basically started out in
      life 2 days ahead of yours troubly and has been uncatchable ever since.

      He's Dr. David Horton and THIS is Positively Wednesday!]



      When he goes out for a hike, he will cover twelve hundred miles in the
      fastest possible solo unaided fastpacking time, and still be home for
      supper.

      When he needs anything like water or sustenance, the creatures of the forest
      will generally bring it to him.

      He once announced a speedhiking attempt to reach Mars in record time, and
      the Guinness Book of World Records wrote it in as a "gimme."

      The man absolutely invented the sub-thirty-hour Hardrock Hundred finish. It
      is believed, now at age 60, that he fully expects a sub-twenty-four, mostly
      because one of his students did it.

      When his classes are announced at his university, the registration line
      stretches three-point-one miles.

      A lottery is held each year for neophytes wishing admittance to his "Running
      Class." Those who aren't selected are placed on an ordered waiting list
      with a five-year limit. The university does allow an extra year for those
      whose turn has come.

      Annually for the races he directs, he receive millions of applications from
      around the earth, and some have been known to arrive--postage due--from
      hell, as well, or via Express Mail from heaven.

      His mileages are measured in light-years, and generally rounded up whenever
      the intended distance does not quite match the actual distance.

      At Barkley one year, Satan met him on top of Rat Jaw and tempted him with
      two all-expense-paid weeks at Hedonism II, all the turducken he could eat,
      and 72 virgins from his P.E. classes, but he resisted. Instead he chose
      hill repeats on both Little and Big Hells, crucifixion on the Zip Line, and
      five crowns of sawbriar thorns.

      He is The Most Interesting Man in the World.

      "I don't always drink holy water; but when I do, I prefer Horton's Own.
      Stay thirsty, my friends."





      ( 00 )
      V


      Here.
      See (and hear) some originals:

      http://dosequis.com/



      My mark:

      XX
      Barkley scRitch
      [aka Rich Limacher,
      The TroubleDoer at sbcglobal-dot-net]

      Yankee Folly of the Day:
      BTW, thanks to all who wished me well and happy yesterday! Your wishes,
      unfortunately, were all denied by your representatives in Congress.
    • Twiggsc@aol.com
      Happy Friday, everyone! We re enjoying perfect weather here in North Florida: the Jeep s doors are off, the top is down, and everyone is hitting the trails. In
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 26, 2010
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        Happy Friday, everyone!
        We're enjoying perfect weather here in North Florida: the Jeep's doors are off, the top is down, and everyone is hitting the trails. In fact, we look to have the best weather ever for our local 50k. Unfortunately, a friend of mine who was looking to set a course record (in his ultra debut) is suffering from some pretty uncomfortable abdominal pain following today's hour-long trail run. I wasn't with him, but I imagine he was taking it pretty easy (for him).

        Anyway, his wife gave me a call and asked if I thought this was a common trail-running injury and if he should be concerned. It seems he went online and read about trail-running induced abdominal hernias and now he has medical student syndrome (you know - every disease they read about seems to match symptoms they just realized they have). While I'll admit to suffering my fair share in Hardrock and other adventures on the trail, I don't think I've had quite what he's feeling. I described typical discomfort from the jarring of sudden ups and downs on the trail, some that has even caused bruises if I was really hitting a fast (for me) pace, but this may be more than that.

        So, does anyone, particularly you faster guys, relate to this fellow's situation and have some ideas/advice? He's currently deciding between "just" going for the win tomorrow (not the course record) and "just" going for an MRI.

        Counting the days until the fun really starts (105).
        Chris




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Andy Hewat
        I have a mate who suffers from osteitis pubis which gives him terrible lower abdominal pain. He has carried it for a couple of years but when it flares up he
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 27, 2010
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          I have a mate who suffers from osteitis pubis which gives him terrible lower abdominal pain. He has carried it for a couple of years but when it flares up he rarely finishes and if he does it isn't pretty. And he is one tough nut. Hope your friend is OK and gets to run your 50k.
          Cheers, Andy

          --- On Sat, 27/3/10, Twiggsc@... <Twiggsc@...> wrote:

          From: Twiggsc@... <Twiggsc@...>
          Subject: [hr100] Trail running and abdominal pain
          To: hr100@yahoogroups.com
          Received: Saturday, 27 March, 2010, 8:18 AM
















           









          Happy Friday, everyone!

          We're enjoying perfect weather here in North Florida: the Jeep's doors are off, the top is down, and everyone is hitting the trails. In fact, we look to have the best weather ever for our local 50k. Unfortunately, a friend of mine who was looking to set a course record (in his ultra debut) is suffering from some pretty uncomfortable abdominal pain following today's hour-long trail run. I wasn't with him, but I imagine he was taking it pretty easy (for him).



          Anyway, his wife gave me a call and asked if I thought this was a common trail-running injury and if he should be concerned. It seems he went online and read about trail-running induced abdominal hernias and now he has medical student syndrome (you know - every disease they read about seems to match symptoms they just realized they have). While I'll admit to suffering my fair share in Hardrock and other adventures on the trail, I don't think I've had quite what he's feeling. I described typical discomfort from the jarring of sudden ups and downs on the trail, some that has even caused bruises if I was really hitting a fast (for me) pace, but this may be more than that.



          So, does anyone, particularly you faster guys, relate to this fellow's situation and have some ideas/advice? He's currently deciding between "just" going for the win tomorrow (not the course record) and "just" going for an MRI.



          Counting the days until the fun really starts (105).

          Chris



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Chris Twiggs
          Hi, Andy! Good to hear from you! My friend ran well and shattered the course record. His wife and I teamed up and broke the mixed relay record, so overall it
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 27, 2010
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            Hi, Andy!
            Good to hear from you!

            My friend ran well and shattered the course record. His wife and I
            teamed up and broke the mixed relay record, so overall it was a good
            morning. Not sure what his problem is still, but it wasn't enough of a
            problem, fortunately.
            Chris

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Mar 27, 2010, at 6:43 AM, Andy Hewat <hewat.andy@...> wrote:

            > I have a mate who suffers from osteitis pubis which gives him
            > terrible lower abdominal pain. He has carried it for a couple of
            > years but when it flares up he rarely finishes and if he does it
            > isn't pretty. And he is one tough nut. Hope your friend is OK and
            > gets to run your 50k.
            > Cheers, Andy
            >
            > --- On Sat, 27/3/10, Twiggsc@... <Twiggsc@...> wrote:
            >
            > From: Twiggsc@... <Twiggsc@...>
            > Subject: [hr100] Trail running and abdominal pain
            > To: hr100@yahoogroups.com
            > Received: Saturday, 27 March, 2010, 8:18 AM
            >
            >
            >
            > Happy Friday, everyone!
            >
            > We're enjoying perfect weather here in North Florida: the Jeep's
            > doors are off, the top is down, and everyone is hitting the trails.
            > In fact, we look to have the best weather ever for our local 50k.
            > Unfortunately, a friend of mine who was looking to set a course
            > record (in his ultra debut) is suffering from some pretty
            > uncomfortable abdominal pain following today's hour-long trail run.
            > I wasn't with him, but I imagine he was taking it pretty easy (for
            > him).
            >
            > Anyway, his wife gave me a call and asked if I thought this was a
            > common trail-running injury and if he should be concerned. It seems
            > he went online and read about trail-running induced abdominal
            > hernias and now he has medical student syndrome (you know - every
            > disease they read about seems to match symptoms they just realized
            > they have). While I'll admit to suffering my fair share in Hardrock
            > and other adventures on the trail, I don't think I've had quite what
            > he's feeling. I described typical discomfort from the jarring of
            > sudden ups and downs on the trail, some that has even caused bruises
            > if I was really hitting a fast (for me) pace, but this may be more
            > than that.
            >
            > So, does anyone, particularly you faster guys, relate to this
            > fellow's situation and have some ideas/advice? He's currently
            > deciding between "just" going for the win tomorrow (not the course
            > record) and "just" going for an MRI.
            >
            > Counting the days until the fun really starts (105).
            >
            > Chris
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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