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Nolan's 14 training runs

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  • Matt Mahoney
    I ve scheduled some training runs for Nolan s 14 in Colorado at http://mahoney4.home.netcom.com/nolans/ Briefly: June 24, Mt. Princeton out and back from north
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 17, 2000
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      I've scheduled some training runs for Nolan's 14 in
      Colorado at http://mahoney4.home.netcom.com/nolans/
      Briefly:

      June 24, Mt. Princeton out and back from north
      June 25, Mt. Yale loop from south
      July 1, Mt. Huron, Missouri loop from Winfield
      July 2, Belford, Oxford, Harvard, Columbia, point to
      point with car shuttle

      I posted to the Nolans, Hardrock, and ultra lists.
      Sorry if you got 3 copies.



      =====
      -- Matt Mahoney, matmahoney@...

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    • Matt Mahoney
      1. The Nolan s 14 training run on July 2 over Belford, Oxford, Harvard, and Columbia will start 2 miles from the North Cottonwood trailhead, at the national
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 26, 2000
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        1. The Nolan's 14 training run on July 2 over
        Belford, Oxford, Harvard, and Columbia will start 2
        miles from the North Cottonwood trailhead, at the
        national forest boundary, 1 mile after the road gets
        really bad. This will save about 30 minutes of
        driving. There is a parking area at the boundary. It
        might be a good idea to camp there overnight before
        the 5AM meeting. The July 1 run is unchanged. Go to
        http://mahoney4.home.netcom.com/nolans for details.

        2. I cannot believe how difficult this course is. It
        makes Hardrock look like Vermont. On Saturday I hiked
        from the Avalanche trailhead to Mt. Princeton, about 3
        miles on the Colorado trail (easy), then south on an
        old jeep road at 9600 ft (still easy) until the trail
        ends at a clearing. Then 1500 ft. climb straight up a
        hill at a 50% grade that reminded me of Barkley's Big
        Hell, except for the thin air. At the top I found a
        primitive trail that traverses the hillside at 11,600
        ft for 1/4 mile then disappears, so I bushwacked
        slightly downhill into the Maxwell creek drainage. 4
        hours so far. I saw no way up to Princeton other than
        a class 4 scramble up a 100% grade scree and talus
        field up to about 13000 ft.

        On the ridge it started snowing. Strangely, I was not
        cold even though I wore shorts and a t-shirt. There
        was no trail, just huge boulders. I felt something
        tickle my forearm arm, then again, and realize to my
        horror that my hair was standing on end from static
        charge and the rocks were buzzing and crackling.
        There was no place to hide from the immenent lightning
        strike, so I dropped about 20 feet below the ridge and
        traversed huge snow covered boulders. The storm
        stopped just below the summit and I reached it in 6
        1/2 hours. I took the normal trail down to the east.
        The first 1000 feet descends at a 60-80% grade, like
        Leonard's Butt Slide without the trees to hold onto.
        Then the next mile is through talus, like Short
        Mountain except the rocks are loose. Finally at
        treeline you reach good trail, but I had about 15
        miles to go back to my car. Total time 12 hours. As
        horrible as my climb was, it was probably an hour
        faster than going up the normal route.

        Sunday Carl, Barbara and I climbed Yale. Start at
        7:00 AM, up good trail, summit at 9:29 passing several
        other hikers, down the east ridge to the CO trail and
        back on 3 miles of road, finish at 1:20. I recommend
        during Nolans to come down the south trail and road,
        as our rate of descent down the east ridge was slower
        than our climb. You are picking your way down steep
        rocks down to treeline. You definitely will not run
        it.

        Today I climbed Antero, 20 miles on jeep road in fog,
        rain, snow, sleet, hail, and lightning, and an hour of
        sunshine just in time for the summit. I saw several
        other hikers but I don't think anyone else made it.
        Total time 7 hours.

        Fred Vance is right. Nobody is going to finish all 14
        summits.


        =====
        -- Matt Mahoney, matmahoney@...

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      • Matt Mahoney
        Today I almost climbed Long s Peak, which would have been 6 14 ers in 6 days after coming from sea level. Long s is not on the Nolans course, but I m staying a
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 27, 2000
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          Today I almost climbed Long's Peak, which would have
          been 6 14'ers in 6 days after coming from sea level.
          Long's is not on the Nolans course, but I'm staying a
          friend's house in Golden and his two teenage sons
          wanted to go and it was conveniently close. I know
          the mountain, having climbed both the Keyhole route
          and the north face.

          Anyway we turned back 100 feet from the summit. It's
          not that I minded climbing the Homestretch (200 ft. of
          40 deg. rock face) in a snowstorm, it was the
          lightning striking the summit at 2 minute intervals.
          One bolt was close enough that I felt a static
          discharge through the top of my hat at the instant of
          the explosion.

          When we climbed the Trough (several hundred vertical
          feet of class 3 scramble), much of the rock was coated
          with a thin sheet of ice. When we descended, the ice
          had melted, but there was 2 inches of fresh powder.
          This provided better traction than I thought it would
          on the narrow exposed ledges on the Keyhole route,
          even wearing just running shoes. We had clear skies
          up to the Keyhole (13,000 ft), but you know how the
          weather is in the mountains.

          I heard a rumor from another hiker that a climber had
          died on this mountain yesterday from a 1000 foot fall.
          Anyone hear about this?


          =====
          -- Matt Mahoney, matmahoney@...

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