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questions about Hardrock

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  • markus4345
    Hello, I was very lucky to get into Hardrock. So now I have a couple of questions. I am roadrunner with 56 ultra races and 6 multi day races. I did long
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 6, 2007
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      Hello,

      I was very lucky to get into Hardrock. So now I have a couple of questions.
      I am roadrunner with 56 ultra races and 6 multi day races. I did long distance trekking in
      Europe, Nepal and Ethiopia. Since last year I life in the rockies at 7500 ft. So I am quite new
      to the trail running business.

      1. I know that ultra training is very individual, but do you do any special runs, like up and
      down a 14er 2 times in a row ?

      2. What are you doing with your course map during the run. Do you carry a map case?

      3. How do you treat your feet, since there are a lot of creeks to cross?
      (Special socks, serveral pair of shoes)

      4. Beside Ouray and Telluride are there any easy reachable aid stations for the crews?

      5. Any other suggestions, I don't even think of?

      Thanks a lot
      Markus
    • Matt Mahoney
      ... The best training you can do is on the course itself. Join the course marking parties starting about 2 weeks before the race. Especially train on the
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 6, 2007
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        --- markus4345 <mark.a.mueller@...> wrote:

        > Hello,
        >
        > I was very lucky to get into Hardrock. So now I have a couple of questions.
        > I am roadrunner with 56 ultra races and 6 multi day races. I did long
        > distance trekking in
        > Europe, Nepal and Ethiopia. Since last year I life in the rockies at 7500
        > ft. So I am quite new
        > to the trail running business.
        >
        > 1. I know that ultra training is very individual, but do you do any special
        > runs, like up and
        > down a 14er 2 times in a row ?

        The best training you can do is on the course itself. Join the course marking
        parties starting about 2 weeks before the race. Especially train on the night
        sections (especially around Ouray, easy to get lost) and the sections near the
        end (Chapman to finish).

        I live at sea level (Florida) without hills, rocks, or snow. To train for the
        hills the best I can do is run intervals (barefoot on grass).

        > 2. What are you doing with your course map during the run. Do you carry a
        > map case?

        The map is waterproof. Just carry it in your pack. Carry a compass too.

        > 3. How do you treat your feet, since there are a lot of creeks to cross?
        > (Special socks, serveral pair of shoes)

        Get used to running in wet feet. I prefer lighter shoes with no socks. They
        dry faster. The Walsh PB trainer fell running shoes from the UK are about 9
        ounces and have excellent traction in steep snow and mud. (I have not tried
        the PB racer). The closest in the US is probably the Inov8. I think they are
        still too stiff and heavy, but not as bad as your typical trail shoe. Last
        year I wore 8 oz. Nike Zoom road shoes which worked OK but there was not a lot
        of snow. They were comfortable and I had no blisters, but they were a little
        slippery running down steep, wet tundra. If you plan to run in light shoes
        without socks you will need to strengthen your feet by doing some barefoot
        training.

        > 4. Beside Ouray and Telluride are there any easy reachable aid stations for
        > the crews?

        Cunningham, Sherman, and Chapman Gulch. Your race packet will have details.

        >
        > 5. Any other suggestions, I don't even think of?

        Altitude training. I live at sea level so I usually spend 3 weeks in
        Leadville at 10,000 ft before Hardrock and climb lots of 14ers. I only do
        that because I know the course. You would be better spending that time in
        Silverton.

        During your altitude training, you don't need lots of running. Your fitness
        will come from the months before. Just hiking 14ers for 6-8 hours per day
        will get you ready.


        -- Matt Mahoney, matmahoney@...
      • markus4345
        ... Thanks Matt for your answers, I forgot to tell that I will be in Ouray for a week in mid May and probably 2-3 days around 19 June. Is that to early for the
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 6, 2007
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          --- In hr100@yahoogroups.com, "markus4345" <mark.a.mueller@...> wrote:

          Thanks Matt for your answers,
          I forgot to tell that I will be in Ouray for a week in mid May and probably 2-3 days around 19
          June. Is that to early for the trailmarking?

          Markus
        • Matt Mahoney
          ... There won t be any flags until later, but you can explore the course. There will still be lots of snow at the higher elevations in May. -- Matt Mahoney,
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 6, 2007
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            --- markus4345 <mark.a.mueller@...> wrote:

            > --- In hr100@yahoogroups.com, "markus4345" <mark.a.mueller@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks Matt for your answers,
            > I forgot to tell that I will be in Ouray for a week in mid May and probably
            > 2-3 days around 19
            > June. Is that to early for the trailmarking?
            >
            > Markus

            There won't be any flags until later, but you can explore the course. There
            will still be lots of snow at the higher elevations in May.

            -- Matt Mahoney, matmahoney@...
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