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[hr100] Re: trail shoe crampons

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  • Keri French
    Jennifer: I found a good pair of very lightweight crampons made by CAMP. They are made of a lightweight alloy, they have 6 points (no front points), they
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 8, 2000
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      Jennifer: I found a good pair of very lightweight crampons made by CAMP. They
      are made of a lightweight alloy, they have 6 points (no front points), they
      are adjustable and lace up with a strong and light nylon strap. They fit under
      the front portion of your shoe and are fairly straight forward to put on. I
      have them available in a key dropbag (Ouray) in case I feel the conditions &
      time of day might warrant them. I haven't had to use them yet on the course.
      It would be wise to road test them and get real good at putting them on prior
      to HR. For availability check at any good mountaineering shop. There is
      another type out that sit under the arch of your foot and attach with some
      large rubber bands and don't cost much. They appeared to be made for short
      term use on flat ground and probably wouldn't work well in the San Juans. Good
      luck!

      Jan Gnass
      Bishop,CA

      GRoachHigh@... wrote:

      > I am debating about these little crampons that can be slipped over trail
      > shoes for the steeper or icy snow fields enroute on the Hardrock course. I
      > have inquired with many veterans of the event. Some say they have used them.
      > Some say they do not bother.
      >
      > Are they useful at HR100 and, if so, what kind should I buy? The ones I
      > looked at recently don't appear as though they could stop ones feet from
      > slipping.
      >
      > Jennifer Roach
      > Boulder, CO>
      >
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    • Mitchell A Rossman
      John: I have both 12 point and 4 point crampons. The 12 point crampons are designed to be worn with either plastic or extremely thick-soled leather
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 9, 2000
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        John:

        I have both 12 point and 4 point crampons. The 12 point crampons are
        designed to be worn with either plastic or extremely thick-soled leather
        mountaineering boots. With such a rigid sole, they work like a champ.
        However, I would never ever think of wearing them with flexible trail shoes.
        Four-point crampons are more suitable for trail shoes.

        Mitch Rossman
        Mendota Heights, MN

        -----Original Message-----
        From: John Cappis <cappis@...>
        To: hr100@... <hr100@...>
        Date: Wednesday, March 08, 2000 11:12 PM
        Subject: [hr100] Re: trail shoe crampons


        >All:
        >
        >I have found the discussion about trail shoe crampons to be very
        >interesting. I have never worn crampons during the Hardrock, but have
        >used them on other runs. The crampons I used were the old style 12
        >point with leather straps to hold them on. They were hinged in the
        >middle and by taking them apart at the hinge, I had a nice four point
        >heel crampon that stayed on my shoe well. One problem was if there was
        >any wet snow on the course it balled up in the crampon and pretty soon
        >I was on high heels that were very slick. Great fun for glissading, but
        >spooky on the steep stuff where you really wanted to stay attached.
        >
        >The last three years, the snow level on the course has been down.
        >Before that, we had one year running in the counter clockwise direction
        >where there was so much snow and ice from below the Virginius Mine to
        >Virginius Pass that the course was routed off the road and steps had to
        >be cut for about a mile.
        >
        >My advice, if you have some crampons you can try and will feel
        >comfortable with, bring them along. Whether you will want to use them
        >or not is dependent on what mother nature does to us between now and
        >then as far as snow fall, wind, melting and freezing and who knows what
        >else. I wouldn't wait until run day to see if they are going to work
        >though.
        >
        >
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      • Michael A. Farris
        Hi, I ll throw my instep crampons (not my 10-12 point full length crampons) into the bag. Fit your instep crampons carefully; the straps may need to be
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 10, 2000
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          Hi,
          I'll throw my instep crampons (not my 10-12 point full length
          crampons) into the bag. Fit your instep crampons carefully; the
          straps may need to be modified to fit on a running shoe. To help stop
          snow balling up under the crampon, take a Clorox bottle and cut out
          the sides (so you have a flat piece of plastic). Stab the crampons
          through and trim off the excess. Now figure out a way to securely
          attach this to the crampon (duct tape?) and you have an anti-balling
          plate.

          If the snow is at all hard, rocks and tent stakes won't do much good
          for self-arrest. There are only a couple of spots where the runout is
          poor, though.

          Mike
          ________________________________________________________________
          Dr. Mike Farris mfarris@...
          Associate Professor of Biology http://www.hamline.edu/~mfarris
          Hamline University, St. Paul, MN 55014
          ________________________________________________________________
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