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Re: [HP2000 Family] How to send "BREAK" via HyperTerm/telnet?

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  • urrossum@att.net
    ... OK, that works just fine - thanks for the help! I ve been using HyperTerm, and haven t yet figured out a similar sequence on that which works. So I guess
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2011
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      > I was using a Win XP client and just did a telnet from the DOS prompt.
      >
      > I was able to send a Break by sending a Ctrl-Space followed by a Return (or Enter on some keyboards).

      OK, that works just fine - thanks for the help! I've been using HyperTerm, and haven't yet figured out a similar sequence on that which works. So I guess I'll just use the DOS prompt method.

      However, I'm also thinking of resurrecting some HP2000 software I wrote in college - specifically, a development tool chain for the 1802 COSMAC processor. I've got an assembler, basic compiler, a full-screen simulator, and a serial downloader, all written in Access-Basic. The simulator depends on a curses-like package I wrote to support the various VDTs that were available to me at the time, which I don't think the DOS prompt will work with.

      Of course, I can just open a DOS prompt to edit with, and a Hyperterm to run the application in, I guess.
    • bbrown314@comcast.net
      Try putty for the telnet connection..break works fine in putty and it s free. -Bob ... From: urrossum@att.net To: hp2000family@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday,
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 1, 2011
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        Try putty for the telnet connection..break works fine in putty and it's free.
        -Bob


        From: urrossum@...
        To: hp2000family@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 11:52:21 AM
        Subject: Re: [HP2000 Family] How to send "BREAK" via HyperTerm/telnet?

         

        > I was using a Win XP client and just did a telnet from the DOS prompt.
        >
        > I was able to send a Break by sending a Ctrl-Space followed by a Return (or Enter on some keyboards).

        OK, that works just fine - thanks for the help! I've been using HyperTerm, and haven't yet figured out a similar sequence on that which works. So I guess I'll just use the DOS prompt method.

        However, I'm also thinking of resurrecting some HP2000 software I wrote in college - specifically, a development tool chain for the 1802 COSMAC processor. I've got an assembler, basic compiler, a full-screen simulator, and a serial downloader, all written in Access-Basic. The simulator depends on a curses-like package I wrote to support the various VDTs that were available to me at the time, which I don't think the DOS prompt will work with.

        Of course, I can just open a DOS prompt to edit with, and a Hyperterm to run the application in, I guess.

      • mgemeny
        Wow, an RCA 1802 development environment running on Access! That would be cool. If you need any help getting it resurrected let me know. What form do you have
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 1, 2011
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          Wow, an RCA 1802 development environment running on Access! That would be cool.

          If you need any help getting it resurrected let me know.

          What form do you have it in and where are you located? It would be great if you had it on 9 track mag tape.

          Feel free to share stories about the 1802 projects that were done using the Access development environment. This would not the first time these two classic systems have crossed paths.

          On the topic of using a real serial port/terminal most of the discussions have ended up concluding that some sort of TCP/serial terminal concentrator would be the easiest approach. Using the serial ports of the host directly from SIMH would pose serious portability problems and SIMH has a strong desire to be as neutral as possible when it comes to the host operating system.

          There were small adapter boxes that were intended to allow serial printers to be connected to Ethernet networks with TCP that would basically open a telnet connection to a host over the network at power up. Something like that may also work for an old RS232 terminal or perhaps even a COSMAC Elf, especially if a reason existed, such as an 1802 development environment running on Access.

          Another option would be an (admittedly OS dependent) shim, a companion program that could open the TCP connection and connect to the serial port. That may need to be different for each supported host operating system, but at least it should work for all SIMH simulators, DEC, IBM, HP, whatever. I have also suggested this for parallel interfaces such as the ones used in the processor interconnect of Access. If we had more of them, we could map them to real parallel ports (with shims) and we could hook up real line printers and paper tape readers to the simulation, but it has never gotten any traction.


          Thanks again, keep us posted.
          Mike G.


          --- In hp2000family@yahoogroups.com, "urrossum@..." <urrossum@...> wrote:
          >
          > > I was using a Win XP client and just did a telnet from the DOS prompt.
          > >
          > > I was able to send a Break by sending a Ctrl-Space followed by a Return (or Enter on some keyboards).
          >
          > OK, that works just fine - thanks for the help! I've been using HyperTerm, and haven't yet figured out a similar sequence on that which works. So I guess I'll just use the DOS prompt method.
          >
          > However, I'm also thinking of resurrecting some HP2000 software I wrote in college - specifically, a development tool chain for the 1802 COSMAC processor. I've got an assembler, basic compiler, a full-screen simulator, and a serial downloader, all written in Access-Basic. The simulator depends on a curses-like package I wrote to support the various VDTs that were available to me at the time, which I don't think the DOS prompt will work with.
          >
          > Of course, I can just open a DOS prompt to edit with, and a Hyperterm to run the application in, I guess.
          >
        • urrossum@att.net
          Sorry about the slow response - I m vacationing in Mexico, and have been somewhat frugal with the available 128k link to the Internet... I have the software in
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 9, 2011
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            Sorry about the slow response - I'm vacationing in Mexico, and have been somewhat frugal with the available 128k link to the Internet...

            I have the software in the form of listings, which I PDF'ed a couple of years ago to save space. OCRing them is possible, but they'll still require quite a bit of hand cleanup because the lineprinted characters are somewhat fuzzy, as well as upper case. Also, there are a couple of data files that will need to be recreated.

            Nothing too overwhelming, though. I'll be tinkering on this over the next few weeks, along with an ELF built into an Altoids tin, based on a board by Lee Hart.

            Then, my next project is a physical, functioning HP2000 Access system, *also* built into an Altoids tin...

            Thanks for the idea of using a "shim" - that seems like the best fit for what I'm trying to do.
            --
            Mark

            BTW, I'm in Silicon Valley.
            -M


            --- In hp2000family@yahoogroups.com, mgemeny <no_reply@...> wrote:
            >
            > Wow, an RCA 1802 development environment running on Access! That would be cool.
            >
            > If you need any help getting it resurrected let me know.
            >
            > What form do you have it in and where are you located? It would be great if you had it on 9 track mag tape.
            >
            > Feel free to share stories about the 1802 projects that were done using the Access development environment. This would not the first time these two classic systems have crossed paths.
            >
            > On the topic of using a real serial port/terminal most of the discussions have ended up concluding that some sort of TCP/serial terminal concentrator would be the easiest approach. Using the serial ports of the host directly from SIMH would pose serious portability problems and SIMH has a strong desire to be as neutral as possible when it comes to the host operating system.
            >
            > There were small adapter boxes that were intended to allow serial printers to be connected to Ethernet networks with TCP that would basically open a telnet connection to a host over the network at power up. Something like that may also work for an old RS232 terminal or perhaps even a COSMAC Elf, especially if a reason existed, such as an 1802 development environment running on Access.
            >
            > Another option would be an (admittedly OS dependent) shim, a companion program that could open the TCP connection and connect to the serial port. That may need to be different for each supported host operating system, but at least it should work for all SIMH simulators, DEC, IBM, HP, whatever. I have also suggested this for parallel interfaces such as the ones used in the processor interconnect of Access. If we had more of them, we could map them to real parallel ports (with shims) and we could hook up real line printers and paper tape readers to the simulation, but it has never gotten any traction.
            >
            >
            > Thanks again, keep us posted.
            > Mike G.
            >
            >
            > --- In hp2000family@yahoogroups.com, "urrossum@" <urrossum@> wrote:
            > >
            > > > I was using a Win XP client and just did a telnet from the DOS prompt.
            > > >
            > > > I was able to send a Break by sending a Ctrl-Space followed by a Return (or Enter on some keyboards).
            > >
            > > OK, that works just fine - thanks for the help! I've been using HyperTerm, and haven't yet figured out a similar sequence on that which works. So I guess I'll just use the DOS prompt method.
            > >
            > > However, I'm also thinking of resurrecting some HP2000 software I wrote in college - specifically, a development tool chain for the 1802 COSMAC processor. I've got an assembler, basic compiler, a full-screen simulator, and a serial downloader, all written in Access-Basic. The simulator depends on a curses-like package I wrote to support the various VDTs that were available to me at the time, which I don't think the DOS prompt will work with.
            > >
            > > Of course, I can just open a DOS prompt to edit with, and a Hyperterm to run the application in, I guess.
            > >
            >
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