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Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat

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  • Kerry Ose
    This article is interesting, but I thought that Feuer took an oddly extreme position. I agree with him that it is ridiculous, offensive even, to absolve those
    Message 2 of 10 , Apr 9, 2013
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      This article is interesting, but I thought that Feuer took an oddly extreme position.  I agree with him that it is ridiculous, offensive even, to absolve those involved in the Atlanta cheating scandal of wrongdoing.  Still, to argue that the climate created by high stakes testing is not a mitigating factor seems almost impossibly naive.  

      At one point Feuer does acknowledge that 'the compelling logic in Campbell's Law- "The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures ..." -is supported by abundant empirical evidence on the effects of overreliance on tests for accountability.'  This rings truer than anything else in his essay.


    • cynthia vaillancourt
      I m not sure I would say the ludicrous testing environment mitigates the culpability of the offenders - but I would say it seems to me to be a forseeable,
      Message 3 of 10 , Apr 9, 2013
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        I'm not sure I would say the ludicrous testing environment "mitigates" the culpability of the offenders - but I would say it seems to me to be a forseeable, inevitable even, result.

        cindyv


        To: howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com
        From: kerry@...
        Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2013 21:50:22 -0400
        Subject: Re: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat

         

        This article is interesting, but I thought that Feuer took an oddly extreme position.  I agree with him that it is ridiculous, offensive even, to absolve those involved in the Atlanta cheating scandal of wrongdoing.  Still, to argue that the climate created by high stakes testing is not a mitigating factor seems almost impossibly naive.  

        At one point Feuer does acknowledge that 'the compelling logic in Campbell's Law- "The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures ..." -is supported by abundant empirical evidence on the effects of overreliance on tests for accountability.'  This rings truer than anything else in his essay.



      • fsnyder22
        It is my understanding from the Atlanta case that the Superintendent (and maybe local administrators and teachers?) had the potential to receive substantial
        Message 4 of 10 , Apr 10, 2013
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          It is my understanding from the Atlanta case that the Superintendent (and maybe local administrators and teachers?) had the potential to receive substantial monetary bonuses based on students' test scores. Such a bonus structure is even more likely to lead to cheating as was seen in Atlanta. Secondly, I think there is too much reliance on a single test to measure too many things: current student status, student improvement over time, teacher quality, school achievement, school system quality and achievement. I know of no test that can do all those things - forgetting about whether or not you even want a test or group of tests to measure those kinds of outcomes.

          Fred


          --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, Ann <anndelacy@...> wrote:
          >
          > An interesting article.
          >
          > http://mobile.edweek.org/c.jsp?DISPATCHED=true&cid=25983841&item=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.edweek.org%2Few%2Farticles%2F2013%2F04%2F09%2F28feuer.h32.html%3Ftkn%3DMLYFi0wQz1gWSe79MtvuuSI4%252F%252BXr37nfiR%252Ft%26cmp%3DENL-EU-VIEWS1
          >
          >
          > Sent from my iPhone
          >
        • Theresa Jones
          Yes, when teachers and administrators are hired for their ability to raise test scores, you are going to get people that raise test scores. You can t fire the
          Message 5 of 10 , Apr 10, 2013
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            Yes, when teachers and administrators are hired for their ability to raise test scores, you are going to get people that raise test scores. You can't fire the people with integrity and then complain about the dishonesty of the rest of them.  It's too much temptation for some people to resist--especially when the devil is sitting on their shoulder telling them how great it would be for them if they cheated.

            I personally think that the problem is that these people got caught going just a little farther than society can stomach. I've seen quasi cheating in HCPSS on the county assessments--where the teacher hands out a study sheet with the questions and answers and the kids take the test the next day.  Or when the teacher says, "when you see the question about x, the answer is y".   I have not heard this happening on the MSA, but I suppose if the tests were available, it would.  When I see this, I tell my kids it's wrong for teachers to worry more about the tests than they do about learning. And I tell my kids they need to focus on learning.  But, what about SAT prep?  Kids that (can afford to) prep get higher scores.  Is it a level playing field for college?

            There is increasing selling out to the tests, sacrificing natural learning.  We had a new teacher this year, fresh out of student teaching, who tried to actually teach.  The kids were enthusiastic and really "turned on", but they were not given study sheets to memorize and the grades were poor.  The parents complained and the teacher resisted but now teaches to the tests.  One more turned to the "dark side".

            So, yes, the people are culpable, but they are in a system that values them for their ability to blur the lines and get the scores up.  How many don't get caught?  Those that have a statistical background and can cheat without raising statistical flags?  How many teachers leave the field or decide not to enter due to this test mentality?  And how many teachers change to meet the testing culture and slide down the slope because they need their jobs and their bonuses and all the perks that come from higher test scores?    

            Theresa







            From: cynthia vaillancourt <CynthiaVaillancourt@...>
            To: "howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com" <howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, April 9, 2013 10:19 PM
            Subject: RE: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat



            I'm not sure I would say the ludicrous testing environment "mitigates" the culpability of the offenders - but I would say it seems to me to be a forseeable, inevitable even, result.

            cindyv


            To: howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com
            From: kerry@...
            Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2013 21:50:22 -0400
            Subject: Re: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat

             

            This article is interesting, but I thought that Feuer took an oddly extreme position.  I agree with him that it is ridiculous, offensive even, to absolve those involved in the Atlanta cheating scandal of wrongdoing.  Still, to argue that the climate created by high stakes testing is not a mitigating factor seems almost impossibly naive.  

            At one point Feuer does acknowledge that 'the compelling logic in Campbell's Law- "The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures ..." -is supported by abundant empirical evidence on the effects of overreliance on tests for accountability.'  This rings truer than anything else in his essay.




            On Tue, Apr 9, 2013 at 1:30 PM, Ann <anndelacy@...> wrote:
             
            An interesting article.

            http://mobile.edweek.org/c.jsp?DISPATCHED=true&cid=25983841&item=http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/04/09/28feuer.h32.html?tkn%3DMLYFi0wQz1gWSe79MtvuuSI4%252F%252BXr37nfiR%252Ft%26cmp%3DENL-EU-VIEWS1

            Sent from my iPhone






          • Ann De Lacy
            Theresa, Well said. Ann Sent from my iPad
            Message 6 of 10 , Apr 10, 2013
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              Theresa,

              Well said.

              Ann

              Sent from my iPad

              On Apr 10, 2013, at 8:05 AM, Theresa Jones <theresajones10@...> wrote:

               

              Yes, when teachers and administrators are hired for their ability to raise test scores, you are going to get people that raise test scores. You can't fire the people with integrity and then complain about the dishonesty of the rest of them.  It's too much temptation for some people to resist--especially when the devil is sitting on their shoulder telling them how great it would be for them if they cheated.

              I personally think that the problem is that these people got caught going just a little farther than society can stomach. I've seen quasi cheating in HCPSS on the county assessments--where the teacher hands out a study sheet with the questions and answers and the kids take the test the next day.  Or when the teacher says, "when you see the question about x, the answer is y".   I have not heard this happening on the MSA, but I suppose if the tests were available, it would.  When I see this, I tell my kids it's wrong for teachers to worry more about the tests than they do about learning. And I tell my kids they need to focus on learning.  But, what about SAT prep?  Kids that (can afford to) prep get higher scores.  Is it a level playing field for college?

              There is increasing selling out to the tests, sacrificing natural learning.  We had a new teacher this year, fresh out of student teaching, who tried to actually teach.  The kids were enthusiastic and really "turned on", but they were not given study sheets to memorize and the grades were poor.  The parents complained and the teacher resisted but now teaches to the tests.  One more turned to the "dark side".

              So, yes, the people are culpable, but they are in a system that values them for their ability to blur the lines and get the scores up.  How many don't get caught?  Those that have a statistical background and can cheat without raising statistical flags?  How many teachers leave the field or decide not to enter due to this test mentality?  And how many teachers change to meet the testing culture and slide down the slope because they need their jobs and their bonuses and all the perks that come from higher test scores?    

              Theresa







              From: cynthia vaillancourt <CynthiaVaillancourt@...>
              To: "howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com" <howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, April 9, 2013 10:19 PM
              Subject: RE: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat



              I'm not sure I would say the ludicrous testing environment "mitigates" the culpability of the offenders - but I would say it seems to me to be a forseeable, inevitable even, result.

              cindyv


              To: howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com
              From: kerry@...
              Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2013 21:50:22 -0400
              Subject: Re: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat

               

              This article is interesting, but I thought that Feuer took an oddly extreme position.  I agree with him that it is ridiculous, offensive even, to absolve those involved in the Atlanta cheating scandal of wrongdoing.  Still, to argue that the climate created by high stakes testing is not a mitigating factor seems almost impossibly naive.  

              At one point Feuer does acknowledge that 'the compelling logic in Campbell's Law- "The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures ..." -is supported by abundant empirical evidence on the effects of overreliance on tests for accountability.'  This rings truer than anything else in his essay.







            • Kerry Ose
              I agree! Fred and Theresa both make great points.
              Message 7 of 10 , Apr 10, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                I agree!  Fred and Theresa both make great points. 


                On Wed, Apr 10, 2013 at 8:26 AM, Ann De Lacy <anndelacy@...> wrote:
                 

                Theresa,

                Well said.

                Ann

                Sent from my iPad

                On Apr 10, 2013, at 8:05 AM, Theresa Jones <theresajones10@...> wrote:

                 

                Yes, when teachers and administrators are hired for their ability to raise test scores, you are going to get people that raise test scores. You can't fire the people with integrity and then complain about the dishonesty of the rest of them.  It's too much temptation for some people to resist--especially when the devil is sitting on their shoulder telling them how great it would be for them if they cheated.

                I personally think that the problem is that these people got caught going just a little farther than society can stomach. I've seen quasi cheating in HCPSS on the county assessments--where the teacher hands out a study sheet with the questions and answers and the kids take the test the next day.  Or when the teacher says, "when you see the question about x, the answer is y".   I have not heard this happening on the MSA, but I suppose if the tests were available, it would.  When I see this, I tell my kids it's wrong for teachers to worry more about the tests than they do about learning. And I tell my kids they need to focus on learning.  But, what about SAT prep?  Kids that (can afford to) prep get higher scores.  Is it a level playing field for college?

                There is increasing selling out to the tests, sacrificing natural learning.  We had a new teacher this year, fresh out of student teaching, who tried to actually teach.  The kids were enthusiastic and really "turned on", but they were not given study sheets to memorize and the grades were poor.  The parents complained and the teacher resisted but now teaches to the tests.  One more turned to the "dark side".

                So, yes, the people are culpable, but they are in a system that values them for their ability to blur the lines and get the scores up.  How many don't get caught?  Those that have a statistical background and can cheat without raising statistical flags?  How many teachers leave the field or decide not to enter due to this test mentality?  And how many teachers change to meet the testing culture and slide down the slope because they need their jobs and their bonuses and all the perks that come from higher test scores?    

                Theresa







                From: cynthia vaillancourt <CynthiaVaillancourt@...>
                To: "howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com" <howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Tuesday, April 9, 2013 10:19 PM
                Subject: RE: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat



                I'm not sure I would say the ludicrous testing environment "mitigates" the culpability of the offenders - but I would say it seems to me to be a forseeable, inevitable even, result.

                cindyv


                To: howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com
                From: kerry@...
                Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2013 21:50:22 -0400
                Subject: Re: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat

                 

                This article is interesting, but I thought that Feuer took an oddly extreme position.  I agree with him that it is ridiculous, offensive even, to absolve those involved in the Atlanta cheating scandal of wrongdoing.  Still, to argue that the climate created by high stakes testing is not a mitigating factor seems almost impossibly naive.  

                At one point Feuer does acknowledge that 'the compelling logic in Campbell's Law- "The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures ..." -is supported by abundant empirical evidence on the effects of overreliance on tests for accountability.'  This rings truer than anything else in his essay.








              • pamythompson
                I think Theresa is on the right track here. When the hcpss mimics the hsa/msa with the quarterly county assessments and teaches to them in almost every respect
                Message 8 of 10 , Apr 10, 2013
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                  I think Theresa is on the right track here. When the hcpss mimics the hsa/msa with the quarterly county assessments and teaches to them in almost every respect you have very little left resembling real education. Cheating becomes irrelevant when the system is designed to produce the same outcome. Futher in regard to test prep for SAT she is absoluteley correct and clearly sees the fence of exclusion. We are actually boring our children out of their minds the way we institutionalize them in our educational facilities. Begining in middle school there must be choices which will allow them to grow into the adults they should be and by high school they should be choosing paths similar to those allowed in college. If you really want quality education than you must allow our children the freedom to experience it.

                  jack


                  --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, Theresa Jones <theresajones10@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Yes, when teachers and administrators are hired for their ability to raise test scores, you are going to get people that raise test scores. You can't fire the people with integrity and then complain about the dishonesty of the rest of them.  It's too much temptation for some people to resist--especially when the devil is sitting on their shoulder telling them how great it would be for them if they cheated.
                  >
                  >
                  > I personally think that the problem is that these people got caught going just a little farther than society can stomach. I've seen quasi cheating in HCPSS on the county assessments--where the teacher hands out a study sheet with the questions and answers and the kids take the test the next day.  Or when the teacher says, "when you see the question about x, the answer is y".   I have not heard this happening on the MSA, but I suppose if the tests were available, it would.  When I see this, I tell my kids it's wrong for teachers to worry more about the tests than they do about learning. And I tell my kids they need to focus on learning.  But, what about SAT prep?  Kids that (can afford to) prep get higher scores.  Is it a level playing field for college?
                  >
                  >
                  > There is increasing selling out to the tests, sacrificing natural learning.  We had a new teacher this year, fresh out of student teaching, who tried to actually teach.  The kids were enthusiastic and really "turned on", but they were not given study sheets to memorize and the grades were poor.  The parents complained and the teacher resisted but now teaches to the tests.  One more turned to the "dark side".
                  >
                  > So, yes, the people are culpable, but they are in a system that values them for their ability to blur the lines and get the scores up.  How many don't get caught?  Those that have a statistical background and can cheat without raising statistical flags?  How many teachers leave the field or decide not to enter due to this test mentality?  And how many teachers change to meet the testing culture and slide down the slope because they need their jobs and their bonuses and all the perks that come from higher test scores?    
                  >
                  > Theresa
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: cynthia vaillancourt <CynthiaVaillancourt@...>
                  > To: "howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com" <howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com>
                  > Sent: Tuesday, April 9, 2013 10:19 PM
                  > Subject: RE: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I'm not sure I would say the ludicrous testing environment "mitigates" the culpability of the offenders - but I would say it seems to me to be a forseeable, inevitable even, result.
                  >
                  > cindyv
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > To: howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com
                  > From: kerry@...
                  > Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2013 21:50:22 -0400
                  > Subject: Re: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  >
                  > This article is interesting, but I thought that Feuer took an oddly extreme position.  I agree with him that it is ridiculous, offensive even, to absolve those involved in the Atlanta cheating scandal of wrongdoing.  Still, to argue that the climate created by high stakes testing is not a mitigating factor seems almost impossibly naive.  
                  >
                  > At one point Feuer does acknowledge that 'the compelling logic in Campbell's Law- "The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures ..." -is supported by abundant empirical evidence on the effects of overreliance on tests for accountability.'  This rings truer than anything else in his essay.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Tue, Apr 9, 2013 at 1:30 PM, Ann <anndelacy@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > > 
                  > >An interesting article.
                  > >
                  > >http://mobile.edweek.org/c.jsp?DISPATCHED=true&cid=25983841&item=http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/04/09/28feuer.h32.html?tkn%3DMLYFi0wQz1gWSe79MtvuuSI4%252F%252BXr37nfiR%252Ft%26cmp%3DENL-EU-VIEWS1
                  > >
                  > >Sent from my iPhone
                  > >
                  >
                • Ann
                  Yes, I don t want to leave out our great sage, Fred. Sent from my iPhone ... Yes, I don t want to leave out our great sage, Fred. Sent from my iPhone On Apr
                  Message 9 of 10 , Apr 10, 2013
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                    Yes, I don't want to leave out our great sage, Fred.

                    Sent from my iPhone

                    On Apr 10, 2013, at 9:14 AM, Kerry Ose <kerry@...> wrote:

                     

                    I agree!  Fred and Theresa both make great points. 


                    On Wed, Apr 10, 2013 at 8:26 AM, Ann De Lacy <anndelacy@...> wrote:
                     

                    Theresa,

                    Well said.

                    Ann

                    Sent from my iPad

                    On Apr 10, 2013, at 8:05 AM, Theresa Jones <theresajones10@...> wrote:

                     

                    Yes, when teachers and administrators are hired for their ability to raise test scores, you are going to get people that raise test scores. You can't fire the people with integrity and then complain about the dishonesty of the rest of them.  It's too much temptation for some people to resist--especially when the devil is sitting on their shoulder telling them how great it would be for them if they cheated.

                    I personally think that the problem is that these people got caught going just a little farther than society can stomach. I've seen quasi cheating in HCPSS on the county assessments--where the teacher hands out a study sheet with the questions and answers and the kids take the test the next day.  Or when the teacher says, "when you see the question about x, the answer is y".   I have not heard this happening on the MSA, but I suppose if the tests were available, it would.  When I see this, I tell my kids it's wrong for teachers to worry more about the tests than they do about learning. And I tell my kids they need to focus on learning.  But, what about SAT prep?  Kids that (can afford to) prep get higher scores.  Is it a level playing field for college?

                    There is increasing selling out to the tests, sacrificing natural learning.  We had a new teacher this year, fresh out of student teaching, who tried to actually teach.  The kids were enthusiastic and really "turned on", but they were not given study sheets to memorize and the grades were poor.  The parents complained and the teacher resisted but now teaches to the tests.  One more turned to the "dark side".

                    So, yes, the people are culpable, but they are in a system that values them for their ability to blur the lines and get the scores up.  How many don't get caught?  Those that have a statistical background and can cheat without raising statistical flags?  How many teachers leave the field or decide not to enter due to this test mentality?  And how many teachers change to meet the testing culture and slide down the slope because they need their jobs and their bonuses and all the perks that come from higher test scores?    

                    Theresa







                    From: cynthia vaillancourt <CynthiaVaillancourt@...>
                    To: "howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com" <howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, April 9, 2013 10:19 PM
                    Subject: RE: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat



                    I'm not sure I would say the ludicrous testing environment "mitigates" the culpability of the offenders - but I would say it seems to me to be a forseeable, inevitable even, result.

                    cindyv


                    To: howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com
                    From: kerry@...
                    Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2013 21:50:22 -0400
                    Subject: Re: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat

                     

                    This article is interesting, but I thought that Feuer took an oddly extreme position.  I agree with him that it is ridiculous, offensive even, to absolve those involved in the Atlanta cheating scandal of wrongdoing.  Still, to argue that the climate created by high stakes testing is not a mitigating factor seems almost impossibly naive.  

                    At one point Feuer does acknowledge that 'the compelling logic in Campbell's Law- "The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures ..." -is supported by abundant empirical evidence on the effects of overreliance on tests for accountability.'  This rings truer than anything else in his essay.








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                  • Ann
                    You are right, Jack. My seven year old granddaughter had a meltdown after 45 minutes of a test. Three of her classmates reacted in the same fashion. BTW,
                    Message 10 of 10 , Apr 10, 2013
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                      You are right, Jack. My seven year old granddaughter had a meltdown after 45 minutes of a test.  Three of her classmates reacted in the same fashion.  BTW, this was in Charles County.

                      Sent from my iPhone

                      On Apr 10, 2013, at 11:42 AM, "pamythompson" <pamythompson@...> wrote:

                       

                      I think Theresa is on the right track here. When the hcpss mimics the hsa/msa with the quarterly county assessments and teaches to them in almost every respect you have very little left resembling real education. Cheating becomes irrelevant when the system is designed to produce the same outcome. Futher in regard to test prep for SAT she is absoluteley correct and clearly sees the fence of exclusion. We are actually boring our children out of their minds the way we institutionalize them in our educational facilities. Begining in middle school there must be choices which will allow them to grow into the adults they should be and by high school they should be choosing paths similar to those allowed in college. If you really want quality education than you must allow our children the freedom to experience it.

                      jack

                      --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, Theresa Jones <theresajones10@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Yes, when teachers and administrators are hired for their ability to raise test scores, you are going to get people that raise test scores. You can't fire the people with integrity and then complain about the dishonesty of the rest of them.  It's too much temptation for some people to resist--especially when the devil is sitting on their shoulder telling them how great it would be for them if they cheated.
                      >
                      >
                      > I personally think that the problem is that these people got caught going just a little farther than society can stomach. I've seen quasi cheating in HCPSS on the county assessments--where the teacher hands out a study sheet with the questions and answers and the kids take the test the next day.  Or when the teacher says, "when you see the question about x, the answer is y".   I have not heard this happening on the MSA, but I suppose if the tests were available, it would.  When I see this, I tell my kids it's wrong for teachers to worry more about the tests than they do about learning. And I tell my kids they need to focus on learning.  But, what about SAT prep?  Kids that (can afford to) prep get higher scores.  Is it a level playing field for college?
                      >
                      >
                      > There is increasing selling out to the tests, sacrificing natural learning.  We had a new teacher this year, fresh out of student teaching, who tried to actually teach.  The kids were enthusiastic and really "turned on", but they were not given study sheets to memorize and the grades were poor.  The parents complained and the teacher resisted but now teaches to the tests.  One more turned to the "dark side".
                      >
                      > So, yes, the people are culpable, but they are in a system that values them for their ability to blur the lines and get the scores up.  How many don't get caught?  Those that have a statistical background and can cheat without raising statistical flags?  How many teachers leave the field or decide not to enter due to this test mentality?  And how many teachers change to meet the testing culture and slide down the slope because they need their jobs and their bonuses and all the perks that come from higher test scores?    
                      >
                      > Theresa
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: cynthia vaillancourt <CynthiaVaillancourt@...>
                      > To: "howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com" <howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com>
                      > Sent: Tuesday, April 9, 2013 10:19 PM
                      > Subject: RE: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > I'm not sure I would say the ludicrous testing environment "mitigates" the culpability of the offenders - but I would say it seems to me to be a forseeable, inevitable even, result.
                      >
                      > cindyv
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > To: howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com
                      > From: kerry@...
                      > Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2013 21:50:22 -0400
                      > Subject: Re: [howardpubliced] Education Week: it's not the test that made them cheat
                      >
                      >  
                      >
                      >
                      > This article is interesting, but I thought that Feuer took an oddly extreme position.  I agree with him that it is ridiculous, offensive even, to absolve those involved in the Atlanta cheating scandal of wrongdoing.  Still, to argue that the climate created by high stakes testing is not a mitigating factor seems almost impossibly naive.  
                      >
                      > At one point Feuer does acknowledge that 'the compelling logic in Campbell's Law- "The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures ..." -is supported by abundant empirical evidence on the effects of overreliance on tests for accountability.'  This rings truer than anything else in his essay.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > On Tue, Apr 9, 2013 at 1:30 PM, Ann <anndelacy@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > > 
                      > >An interesting article.
                      > >
                      > >http://mobile.edweek.org/c.jsp?DISPATCHED=true&cid=25983841&item=http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/04/09/28feuer.h32.html?tkn%3DMLYFi0wQz1gWSe79MtvuuSI4%252F%252BXr37nfiR%252Ft%26cmp%3DENL-EU-VIEWS1
                      > >
                      > >Sent from my iPhone
                      > >
                      >

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