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Re: Meshkin's BOE Remarks

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  • bobr
    What is pathetic is that the Lanzas were fairly well off and still couldn t find enough resources to deal with the kid s problems. Mom had slowly regressed
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 21, 2012
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      What is pathetic is that the Lanzas were fairly well off and still couldn't find enough resources to deal with the kid's problems. Mom had slowly regressed into her own world as she attempted to deal with the kid's mental illness.

      It was probably a good idea to deinstitutionalize the mentally ill, but resources were poorly provided or not existent when these folks were released into the community

      --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, Sue Medicus <berryfolks@...> wrote:
      >
      > You are correct. We as a nation do an abysmal job of helping those with
      > mental illness.
      >
      > I deal with the homeless quite a bit and a large percentage of the
      > chronically homeless deal with mental illness daily without help.
      >
      > Until we find a way to protect them from themselves, we will continue to
      > have these horrific tragedies.
      >
      >
      > Sue medicus
      >
      > On Fri, Dec 21, 2012 at 8:10 AM, fsnyder22 <fsnyder22@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > Mr. Meshkin's use of the word "crazies" speaks to the main problem in
      > > these kinds of incidents - mental illness and the public's perceptions and
      > > uneasiness with the whole topic. Incidents like Shady Hook are not just
      > > about school safety and gun control but almost invariably speak to
      > > society's inability to address the problem of major psychiatric disorders.
      > > Too often we stigmatize people with mental illness by referring to them as
      > > "crazies" which reduces the likelihood that persons suffering from these
      > > problems will seek help, and keeps families from acknowledging the problem.
      > > It is an issue that remains in the "closet". And the problem is not just
      > > about access; Adam Lanza and Mrs. Lanza had access to the mental health
      > > profession. All of the recent similar incidents- Aurora, Blacksburg, Tucson
      > > - point to the same problem; these were all persons who were well known to
      > > the mental health community. We probably need to acknowledge that we do not
      > > do a very good job in treating persons with major psychiatric disorders and
      > > that there needs to be a national conversation about mental illness and
      > > violence and the role of institutionalization in some cases. It makes us
      > > uneasy and uncomfortable but failure to engage in the conversation will
      > > only result in more Shady Hooks.
      > >
      > > Fred Snyder
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "pamythompson" <pamythompson@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Tonight Meshkin said if we put bars on the windows the crazies would
      > > figure that out too. Not sure if you still follow Howardpubliced but this
      > > one is for you Brian.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > http://news.yahoo.com/2-inmates-escape-high-rise-jail-chicago-214646886.html
      > > >
      > > > CHICAGO (AP) — Two bank robbers pulled off a daring escape from downtown
      > > Chicago's high-rise jail Tuesday by apparently scaling down about 20
      > > stories using a makeshift rope tied to the bars in a cell window.
      > > >
      > > > Police helicopters and canine units swarmed the area, but not until more
      > > than three hours after Joseph "Jose" Banks and Kenneth Conley went
      > > unaccounted for during a 5 a.m. headcount, U.S. Marshal's Service
      > > spokeswoman Belkis Cantor said.
      > > >
      > > > Both men were still at large late Tuesday night.
      > > >
      > > > Investigators found a broken window in the men's cell, where window bars
      > > were found inside a mattress, according to an FBI affidavit filed late
      > > Tuesday. Fake metal bars also were found in the men's cell, a rope was tied
      > > to a window bar, and each man's bed was stuffed with clothing and sheets to
      > > resemble a body, the affidavit said.
      > > >
      > > > It appeared to illustrate a meticulously planned escape from the
      > > 27-story facility that came a week after Banks made a courtroom vow of
      > > retribution. Both men are facing hefty prison sentences, and the FBI said
      > > they should be considered armed and dangerous.
      > > >
      > > > SWAT teams stormed at least one home in Tinley Park, a suburb south of
      > > the city. Although neither man was found, evidence suggested that both had
      > > been at the home just hours earlier, according to the FBI.
      > > >
      > > > Some schools went on lockdown after being inundated with calls from
      > > nervous parents. Mike Byrne, a superintendent in Tinley Park, said "our
      > > parents are so emotionally charged right now" because of the school
      > > shootings in Connecticut.
      > > >
      > > > Hours after the escape, a rope possibly made of bed sheets could be seen
      > > dangling down the side of the Metropolitan Correctional Center. At least
      > > 200 feet long and knotted about every 6 feet, the rope was hanging from a
      > > window that was 6 feet tall but only 6 inches in diameter.
      > > >
      > > > The facility is one of the only skyscraper lockups in the world, and
      > > experts say its triangular shape was meant to make it easier to guard,
      > > theoretically reducing blind spots for guards. The only other escape from
      > > the nearly 40-year-old facility occurred in the mid-1980s, Cantor said.
      > > >
      > > > Exactly when Banks, 37, and Conley, 38, escaped remains unclear. Shop
      > > owners across the street from the wall the men scaled said police suddenly
      > > flooded into the area around 8:30 a.m., hours after they missed a
      > > headcount. Police initially said the men escaped sometime between 5 a.m.
      > > and 8:45 a.m.
      > > >
      > > > Both men were wearing orange jumpsuits, but police believe they may have
      > > quickly changed into white T-shirts, gray sweat pants and white gym shoes.
      > > The FBI believes both men were in Tinley Park, a heavily wooded area about
      > > 25 miles south of Chicago. Authorities were scouring a local forest
      > > preserve in the afternoon.
      > > >
      > > > Banks, known as the Second-Hand Bandit because he wore used clothes
      > > during his heists, was convicted last week of robbing two banks and
      > > attempting to rob two others. Authorities say he stole almost $600,000, and
      > > most of that still is missing.
      > > >
      > > > During trial, he had to be restrained because he threatened to walk out
      > > of the courtroom. He acted as his own attorney and verbally sparred with
      > > the prosecutor, at times arguing that that U.S. law didn't apply to him
      > > because he was a sovereign citizen of a group that was above state and
      > > federal law.
      > > >
      > > > After he was convicted by U.S. District Judge Rebecca Pallmeyer, he said
      > > he would "be seeking retribution as well as damages," the Chicago Sun-Times
      > > and Chicago Tribune reported.
      > > >
      > > > When the judge asked how long he needed to submit a filing, Banks
      > > replied: "No motion will be filed, but you'll hear from me."
      > > >
      > > > Pallmeyer, a prominent federal judge who oversaw the corruption trial of
      > > now imprisoned former Illinois Gov. George Ryan, appeared to stick to her
      > > regular schedule Tuesday and there were no signs of extra security. Her
      > > office declined comment.
      > > >
      > > > Conley pleaded guilty last October to robbing a Homewood Bank last year
      > > of nearly $4,000. Conley, who worked at the time at a suburban strip club,
      > > wore a coat and tie when he robbed the bank, and had a gun stuffed in his
      > > waistband.
      > > >
      > > > Both men were being held in the Chicago lockup, which houses around 700
      > > inmates awaiting trial in the Dirksen Federal Building a few blocks away.
      > > It is one of the only skyscraper jails in the world, said Jennifer Lucente
      > > of Chicago Architecture Foundation.
      > > >
      > > > Architect Harry Weese designed the building in the mid-1970s shortly
      > > after notorious prison riots in Attica, N.Y., and was asked to design a
      > > "more humane" lockup, Lucente said. That was one reason Weese ensured each
      > > cell had a window, she said.
      > > >
      > > > The brother of Hollywood director Christopher Nolan also tried to escape
      > > in 2010. Matthew Nolan, who was being held pending an extradition request,
      > > was sentenced to 14 months in jail for plotting to escape from by hiding a
      > > rope made out of bed sheets in his cell.
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > Sue Medicus
      >
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