Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [howardpubliced] Calendar for 2012-2013 school year

Expand Messages
  • Ray Lischner
    I agree that so-called Take your child to work day should be a normal school day. What job permits a child to follow for eight hours? I am not allowed to
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 1, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      I agree that so-called "Take your child to work day" should be a normal
      school day.

      What job permits a child to follow for eight hours? I am not allowed to
      bring children to my work place. My wife's workplace holds a special
      gathering for kids, which is fun and mildly educational, but has no bearing
      whatsoever on my wife's job. My kids learn nothing about our work from "Take
      your child to work day."

      The biggest impact on our family is that one parent is forced to take
      vacation time to watch the kids because they are not in school. What does
      that really teach our children about work?
      --
      Ray Lischner
    • theresajones10
      Leslie, I usually agree with many of your ideas, but the tone you are taking regarding parents who let their kids stay home is concerning. So is your
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 1, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Leslie,
        I usually agree with many of your ideas, but the tone you are taking regarding "parents who let their kids stay home" is concerning. So is your statement about kids who board the bus at the motels on Rt 1 needing to be in school as much as possible.
        Parents are the primary educators. We choose to send our kids to HCPSS. It is up to us to decide what is best for them, based on our knowledge of the school program as well our knowledge of our children. I disagree with any rules meant to control parents (beyond the basic ones that CPS is there for).
        It's hard enough to be a parent without being judged because you keep your kid home on days when home is a better choice. I DO support my kids in doing homework, obeying teachers, and in attending school. I want them to learn and feel HCPSS is the best place available to us with our means. But I also support them in growing up in a healthy way. School is not perfect. And is not the safe, nurturing environment it needs to be all the time for every child.

        My kids go to work with either mom or dad, again my choice, and the workplace is inviting.


        Regarding kids living in poverty. Sure, there are some cases where attending school is better than the alternative to home life, but poverty doesn't automatically make that true. And even if it did, the solution isn't necessarily more school. I totally disagree with the idea that if you live in a motel, you need to go to school more. Seriously, parenting is hard enough, and then you add poverty to the mix and the judgment of people who make blanket statements about a parent's ability to support your child's education. You can find kids who are struggling at any SE level. Poverty makes parenting harder, and it may legitimately make school NOT BE the SOLE PRIORITY for a kid's life. And more school doesn't solve poverty. In fact, it may compound problems. My kids have told me about the horrible bullying some kids get when they are seen boarding buses at the motels. And how the teachers treat them like they are temporary students. There may be problems with the calendar, but lets not pretend that we are making decisions for the good of the "motel kids".

        If you want to improve their lives, work on continuity when the kids switch schools, sensitivity training for the teachers, and, and, and. The calendar is totally unrelated.




        --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "Leslie Kornreich" <leslie@...> wrote:
        >
        > Rose,
        >
        > Parents who just "let their kids stay home that day" need to understand that will be an UNEXCUSED absence.
        >
        > Leslie Kornreich
      • Leslie Kornreich
        Theresa, In no way am I trying to take away your right to take your child to work on that day in April. If you choose to do so, it should certainly be an
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 1, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Theresa,

          In no way am I trying to take away your right to take your child to work on that day in April. If you choose to do so, it should certainly be an excused absence.

          Too many parents (and students) were treating it as a "skip day", so HCPSS gave in and made it a day off. In my opinion, as I have stated in previous posts, it should not be a day off and, with the exception of parents who are legitimately taking their children to work, (or sick), an unexcused absence. I am not judging you for keeping your child home when "home is a better choice"; it simply does not constitute an excused absence. The rules for what does are clearly laid out in Policy 9010 on the HCPSS website:

          Lawful absence – An excused absence for any portion of the day under the
          following conditions (COMAR 13A.08.01.03):
          1. Death in the immediate family
          2. Illness of the student
          3. Court summons
          4. Hazardous weather conditions
          5. Work approved or sponsored by the school
          6. Observance of a religious holiday
          7. State emergency
          8. Suspension
          9. Lack of authorized transportation
          10. Other emergency or set of circumstances which, in the judgment of the Superintendent or designee, constitutes a good and sufficient cause for absence from school.

          I agree with you that poverty is not the only condition that results in kids who are struggling in school. But I stand by my belief that children whose parents are working so many hours that they cannot be home with them are better off in school than staying home alone all day. Even middle class working parents have told me that it is very difficult for them to take time off work to be home with their children on the multitude of days off and half-days that we have in our calendar.

          I, like you, support my kids in doing homework, obeying teachers, and in attending school. And I am fortunate enough to be able to engage my kids in enriching activities when there are days off school. But the number of us who are fortunate enough to be home with our kids is dwindling -- I know SO many moms who used to be at home but have returned to work as a matter of economic necessity. So their kids are either home alone when there is no school or their parents must take off work.

          I am not fighting this fight for the "motel kids", but for every student who I believe should be in school that day, and that HCPSS should not give in to the students and parents who would treat it as a "skip day". As I said, parents who wish to take their children to work should be able to do so, but they are not so large in number as to necessitate closing school for everyone.

          Leslie Kornreich


          --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "theresajones10" <theresajones10@...> wrote:
          >
          > Leslie,
          > I usually agree with many of your ideas, but the tone you are taking regarding "parents who let their kids stay home" is concerning. So is your statement about kids who board the bus at the motels on Rt 1 needing to be in school as much as possible.
          > Parents are the primary educators. We choose to send our kids to HCPSS. It is up to us to decide what is best for them, based on our knowledge of the school program as well our knowledge of our children. I disagree with any rules meant to control parents (beyond the basic ones that CPS is there for).
          > It's hard enough to be a parent without being judged because you keep your kid home on days when home is a better choice. I DO support my kids in doing homework, obeying teachers, and in attending school. I want them to learn and feel HCPSS is the best place available to us with our means. But I also support them in growing up in a healthy way. School is not perfect. And is not the safe, nurturing environment it needs to be all the time for every child.
          >
          > My kids go to work with either mom or dad, again my choice, and the workplace is inviting.
          >
          >
          > Regarding kids living in poverty. Sure, there are some cases where attending school is better than the alternative to home life, but poverty doesn't automatically make that true. And even if it did, the solution isn't necessarily more school. I totally disagree with the idea that if you live in a motel, you need to go to school more. Seriously, parenting is hard enough, and then you add poverty to the mix and the judgment of people who make blanket statements about a parent's ability to support your child's education. You can find kids who are struggling at any SE level. Poverty makes parenting harder, and it may legitimately make school NOT BE the SOLE PRIORITY for a kid's life. And more school doesn't solve poverty. In fact, it may compound problems. My kids have told me about the horrible bullying some kids get when they are seen boarding buses at the motels. And how the teachers treat them like they are temporary students. There may be problems with the calendar, but lets not pretend that we are making decisions for the good of the "motel kids".
          >
          > If you want to improve their lives, work on continuity when the kids switch schools, sensitivity training for the teachers, and, and, and. The calendar is totally unrelated.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "Leslie Kornreich" <leslie@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Rose,
          > >
          > > Parents who just "let their kids stay home that day" need to understand that will be an UNEXCUSED absence.
          > >
          > > Leslie Kornreich
          >
        • Heather Cindric
          Leslie and Rose, This idea that education is mandatory, with excused and unexcused absences, kids can t just stay home because they feel like it, doesn t
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 1, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Leslie and Rose,

            This idea that education is mandatory, with excused and unexcused absences, kids can't "just stay home because they feel like it," doesn't come from a healthy place.  Going to school and advancing along a curriculum is not equal to learning!  Many of our most precious learning experiences do not happen in the context of learning a curriculum that the teachers are responsible for or just showing up at school for 180 days a year. 

            The system we developed to insure accountability with set curriculum and standardized testing and analyzing the results for "challenges" to address feels like progress to society because we can count the days, the right answers on the tests, appearances in class of different groups, etc. We like it because it is quantifiable and people (students, teachers, even parents sometimes) can be held accountable for their actions.  It's egalitarian, we can all be punished in the same way when we don't perform as required.  

            But it is a very passive way to learn for most kids: come to school, do what you're told, when you're told and you're an A student in no time. As a reward your future is assured at college for which you will get plenty of scholarships because you were an A student. Then you can do more of the same at college and in your future career to become successful.  By the time they get to high school, many of these kids have already been taught to patiently wait to be given the right answers and be successful.  It comes at a price - kids give up a lot to get there, curiosity, willingness to take risks, even health - all things that we need in our society.   This is not true education.  It needs to change. 

            School should be an engaging place where we offer activities that kids find intriguing and want  to learn more about.  Where there is time to pursue it.  Where we inspire curiosity and acknowledge ingenuity.  Where we offer choices for kids: come to school to do X, Y or Z or do your own project at home, or on site or the work place and do A, B or C.  It shouldn't matter if there is a grade involved, because the kids find their own meaning in the projects that they chose.  This happens less and less because of the pressures that society and parents mistakenly put on schools to PERFORM to some standard.  With No Child Left Behind, Core Curriculum Standards and Race to the Top we have kicked it up a notch with scientific-seeming ways to quantify massive amounts of data into something that says that schools and teachers are doing their jobs and orderly mappings of what kids with a "good" education should know.  These schemes only work with a captive audience.  Hence the push for improved attendance rates not for the sake of education or students but so that schools can accomplish their goals and teach the curriculum.  School is not a prison nor are students employees of the state or county and they have no obligation to be there, let's remember that. 

            Whether or not to have school on "Take Your Kids to Work Day" is a small thing compared to the changes that we truly need to accomplish, but it is an opportunity to make one small, positive change.  If it isn't worth the school's  time - as some have said - to have school on this day, then make it worth the student's time.  Use this one day to model what should be happening every day.  Encourage schools to come up with a grand plan, recruit volunteers and make "Take Your Kids to Work Day" a special event at school that engages students and reawakens curiosity.  Then give parents a choice, not an punitive ultimatum.

            Heather CIndric

            On Fri, Sep 30, 2011 at 3:29 PM, Leslie Kornreich <leslie@...> wrote:
             

            Would it be an excused absence for parents to "let their kids stay home" because they feel like it any other school day? Why should this one be different? And if kids are being allowed to stay home because "no one else is going," now is the time to break that cycle. It's like "senior skip day"; no administration that I know of condones it and it is considered an unexcused absence.

            LK



            --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "Leslie Kornreich" <leslie@...> wrote:
            >
            > Rose,
            >
            > Parents who just "let their kids stay home that day" need to understand that will be an UNEXCUSED absence.
            >
            > Leslie Kornreich
            >
            >
            > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, Rose DiLosa <rose@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Heather,
            > > I think the teachers are trapped. If they tell the students that the
            > > activity is not for a grade, the students tune out. But if they make it for
            > > a grade, then the students who were present have grades that those with
            > > excused absences do not have.
            > > I'm not sure why that is a problem. I agree with you; it could be an
            > > opportunity and students/parents could choose whether the "take your kid to
            > > work" activity or the small group in-school activity was more valuable for
            > > their child.
            > > Unfortunately, since the activity does not have to be made-up, a lot of
            > > parents let their kids stay home that day, which is part of the problem.
            > > Perhaps if the in-school activity was advertised in advance, and had enough
            > > perceived value, it would attract more participation.
            > > Rose
            > >
            >




            --
            --
            Heather Cindric

          • theresajones10
            Leslie, My point was that your argument sounds paternalistic to me, and that you are making assumptions that I don t think are necessarily valid. I m glad
            Message 5 of 14 , Oct 1, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Leslie,
              My point was that your argument sounds paternalistic to me, and that you are making assumptions that I don't think are necessarily valid. I'm glad you clarified that you are not basing calendar decisions on these assumptions. I'm sorry I misinterpreted. Take care. Also wanted to say I 100% agree with Heather Cedric.

              --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "Leslie Kornreich" <leslie@...> wrote:
              >
              > Theresa,
              >
              > In no way am I trying to take away your right to take your child to work on that day in April. If you choose to do so, it should certainly be an excused absence.
              >
              > Too many parents (and students) were treating it as a "skip day", so HCPSS gave in and made it a day off. In my opinion, as I have stated in previous posts, it should not be a day off and, with the exception of parents who are legitimately taking their children to work, (or sick), an unexcused absence. I am not judging you for keeping your child home when "home is a better choice"; it simply does not constitute an excused absence. The rules for what does are clearly laid out in Policy 9010 on the HCPSS website:
              >
              > Lawful absence – An excused absence for any portion of the day under the
              > following conditions (COMAR 13A.08.01.03):
              > 1. Death in the immediate family
              > 2. Illness of the student
              > 3. Court summons
              > 4. Hazardous weather conditions
              > 5. Work approved or sponsored by the school
              > 6. Observance of a religious holiday
              > 7. State emergency
              > 8. Suspension
              > 9. Lack of authorized transportation
              > 10. Other emergency or set of circumstances which, in the judgment of the Superintendent or designee, constitutes a good and sufficient cause for absence from school.
              >
              > I agree with you that poverty is not the only condition that results in kids who are struggling in school. But I stand by my belief that children whose parents are working so many hours that they cannot be home with them are better off in school than staying home alone all day. Even middle class working parents have told me that it is very difficult for them to take time off work to be home with their children on the multitude of days off and half-days that we have in our calendar.
              >
              > I, like you, support my kids in doing homework, obeying teachers, and in attending school. And I am fortunate enough to be able to engage my kids in enriching activities when there are days off school. But the number of us who are fortunate enough to be home with our kids is dwindling -- I know SO many moms who used to be at home but have returned to work as a matter of economic necessity. So their kids are either home alone when there is no school or their parents must take off work.
              >
              > I am not fighting this fight for the "motel kids", but for every student who I believe should be in school that day, and that HCPSS should not give in to the students and parents who would treat it as a "skip day". As I said, parents who wish to take their children to work should be able to do so, but they are not so large in number as to necessitate closing school for everyone.
              >
              > Leslie Kornreich
              >
              >
              > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "theresajones10" <theresajones10@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Leslie,
              > > I usually agree with many of your ideas, but the tone you are taking regarding "parents who let their kids stay home" is concerning. So is your statement about kids who board the bus at the motels on Rt 1 needing to be in school as much as possible.
              > > Parents are the primary educators. We choose to send our kids to HCPSS. It is up to us to decide what is best for them, based on our knowledge of the school program as well our knowledge of our children. I disagree with any rules meant to control parents (beyond the basic ones that CPS is there for).
              > > It's hard enough to be a parent without being judged because you keep your kid home on days when home is a better choice. I DO support my kids in doing homework, obeying teachers, and in attending school. I want them to learn and feel HCPSS is the best place available to us with our means. But I also support them in growing up in a healthy way. School is not perfect. And is not the safe, nurturing environment it needs to be all the time for every child.
              > >
              > > My kids go to work with either mom or dad, again my choice, and the workplace is inviting.
              > >
              > >
              > > Regarding kids living in poverty. Sure, there are some cases where attending school is better than the alternative to home life, but poverty doesn't automatically make that true. And even if it did, the solution isn't necessarily more school. I totally disagree with the idea that if you live in a motel, you need to go to school more. Seriously, parenting is hard enough, and then you add poverty to the mix and the judgment of people who make blanket statements about a parent's ability to support your child's education. You can find kids who are struggling at any SE level. Poverty makes parenting harder, and it may legitimately make school NOT BE the SOLE PRIORITY for a kid's life. And more school doesn't solve poverty. In fact, it may compound problems. My kids have told me about the horrible bullying some kids get when they are seen boarding buses at the motels. And how the teachers treat them like they are temporary students. There may be problems with the calendar, but lets not pretend that we are making decisions for the good of the "motel kids".
              > >
              > > If you want to improve their lives, work on continuity when the kids switch schools, sensitivity training for the teachers, and, and, and. The calendar is totally unrelated.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "Leslie Kornreich" <leslie@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Rose,
              > > >
              > > > Parents who just "let their kids stay home that day" need to understand that will be an UNEXCUSED absence.
              > > >
              > > > Leslie Kornreich
              > >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.