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Re: U.S. prep schools push to recruit foreign students

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  • pamythompson
    Where I agree is that all options should be put on the table and where I agree the most is that the public should have a greater role in what our schools do .
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 1, 2010
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      Where I agree is that all options should be put on the table and where I agree the most is that the public should have a greater role in what our schools do . To explore hybrid programs , public / private , is probably a good idea so long as we have checks and balances so that we do not create elite areas .

      This statement concerns me . Actually , David I would like to see you expand on it .

      "Principals and teachers aren't going to work hard to attract a few extra students unless there is something in it for them. But if they personally and/or each school as a whole was rewarded for higher performance, they would have more incentive than they do now to push for better results rather than to be content with the status quo."

      The reason being is that we are not just speaking of incentives for bringing cash to the table as a private firm would do naturally but here it appears that we need to offer incentives for doing their jobs whereas in the private world nonproductive personnel are dismissed .

      Perhaps what we need is to have improvement become a competition between schools . Competition would allow some freedom to improve our schools . The competition could be broken down by the three levels of elementary , middle and high schools and even by grade K - 12 . The best ideas or programs would be implemented county wide so as to improve all schools and a cash incentive could go to each winning school . You could also do this to a lesser extent on an individual level . If you were to have a number of categories then you could have multiple winners per year which would create a balance . What you are left with is a little freelance funding and bragging rights.

      Jack



      --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "david_thalheimer" <dthalheimerusa@...> wrote:
      >
      > Anything that improves the incentives for the Board of Ed and the school system to improve school performance should be a good thing. So, I don't think that charging non-resident students would be bad as long as other residents are not adversely affected (e.g. redistricted out of their school), but it isn't going to help much by itself.
      >
      > Principals and teachers aren't going to work hard to attract a few extra students unless there is something in it for them. But if they personally and/or each school as a whole was rewarded for higher performance, they would have more incentive than they do now to push for better results rather than to be content with the status quo.
      >
      > I don't know how performance is currently measured or rewarded, but I think that doing this properly is the key to improving our schools. I would like to see this information made public and include public input as part of the process.
      >
      > - David T
      >
      > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "pamythompson" <pamythompson@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Bullis is an 80 acre campus on Falls rd in Potomac Md
      > >
      > > http://www.bullis.org/
      > >
      > > Look at the tuition
      > >
      > > The other schools in this article are in similar areas and are catering to the wealthy both here and abroad , completely diferent from what we have in public school . You need to understand the work ethic and sense of family and community these people have as well as their willingness to sacrifice . You also need to understand that the parents and grand parents of these children from places like South Korea come from a place far diferent from here , have known poverty and war which most of you have been insulated from and have very diferent views .
      > >
      > > No , i believe that we can improve our schools without selling them and I believe that it requires a new approach with a true and transparent partnership between the community and the syatem . Pouring money in the wrong direction is not a solution . We had years of wealth and the product our system turned out did not improve .
      > >
      > > Jack
      > >
      > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "pamythompson" <pamythompson@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I hear basicly the same as David . Primarily from Centenial , River Hill , Glenelg and a few others although it is the same throughout the country with schools that have a reputation ( based on test scores ) . I have heard this from teachers in these schools that teach AP classes , these schools are well known in places like South Korea . The families that I knew of came here legally but the entire family lived in one bedroom in a relative's apartment . I have heard of children here that live with friends but do not know their status . The issue is that these folks research what appears to be good schools and then migrate there , eventually establishing a community with similar interests .
      > > >
      > > > I do not think that targeting a group of people wether they come for education or work or what ever they percieve to be of importance is the right approach . What is being stressed here is that some schools are more desirable then others .
      > > >
      > > > Jack
      > > >
      > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "david_thalheimer" <dthalheimerusa@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > One of my former neighbors took in the child of relatives who lived in South Korea so that the child could attend public school here. As far as I know, the parents were neither US citizens nor residents, and I don't know what legal steps they had to take to make this possible (or if it was even legal).
      > > > >
      > > > > - David T
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "bobrosebrough21045" <bobrosebrough21045@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > "I know that some of our public school students are foreign kids who live with relatives in the county in order to attend a good US school"
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I am curious as to the sort of your information as it is mostly incorrect. The vast majority of the foreign born kids in our public schools (HCPSS) are here as either US citizens (born in the US) or as offspring of parents with legal immigration status. It is virtually impossible for a foreign kid to arbitrarily move to the US and live with a noncustodial relative for the purpose of attending a US school tuition free. Exceptions can be made if judgements are made by the State Department as to extenuating circumstances. Remember, the residency rules do not apply to private schools for obvious reasons. The same analogy would apply if some Jerseyite would move in with a relative to go to the U of MD as an in state sudent. Residency for tuition (at secondary and post secondary schools) is a horse of a different flavor.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "david_thalheimer" <dthalheimerusa@> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I know that some of our public school students are foreign kids who live with relatives in the county in order to attend a good US school. I don't know if they pay tuition. See the article below about the increase in foreign students attending US high schools. Theoretically, higher tuition for foreign students on a student visa could provide extra income for our school system to improve services to citizens. It would also be like having a funded student exchange program.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > - David T
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > U.S. prep schools push to recruit foreign students
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > By Michael Alison Chandler
      > > > > > > The Washington Post
      > > > > > > http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/29/AR2010032903514_pf.html
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Tuesday, March 30, 2010; B01
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > When Dixi Wu finished middle school in Kunming, China, last year, she had a hard decision to make. The skilled violinist and top-ranked student tested into one of the most competitive high schools in her province. Yet Bullis School in suburban Maryland, faced with falling applications during the depressed economy, also wanted her.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > "I'm only 15," she said. "To go all the way to the other half of the world, I was scared."
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Easing her decision was a personal interview with Bullis's headmaster, Tom Farquhar, who on his first tour of China met with dozens of students and addressed crowds of parents interested in giving their children a running start toward a prized American college diploma.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Universities and some boarding schools long have drawn heavily from overseas, but aggressive international efforts are becoming more common for other U.S. prep schools eager to recruit from among rising numbers of East Asian students capable of paying full fare. More private schools are posting ads in foreign newspapers, redesigning their Web sites in multiple languages and taking part in recruiting fairs, where they promise to provide language training and the right mix of course work and extracurricular activities to enhance college applications.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > After meeting with Farquhar, Dixi chose Bullis. Now she is reading Kurt Vonnegut in her English class, studying debate and political cartoons in history, and running track for the Bullis Bulldogs. The cost to her parents, both telecommunications executives, is close to $40,000 a year for tuition and living expenses.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > At a time when many "Made in the USA" products struggle in the global marketplace, American diplomas are more coveted than ever. More than 650,000 international students were enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities in 2009, fueling a nearly $18 billion international education industry. Federal government data show that 35,000 foreign students attend primary or secondary schools in the United States, not including one-year cultural exchange programs or short-term language courses.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > For American private schools, the rising interest from East Asia comes at a key moment. The recession has forced many U.S. families to reconsider whether they can afford the costs of tuition and lodging. Charitable giving and endowments also have suffered. Many schools are grappling with fewer applications and, in the worst cases, the possibility of closure.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Bullis was not in such dire straits, school officials said, but applications from U.S. students dipped last year, while demand was up in China. The Potomac school, on an 80-acre wooded campus, started admitting students from China several years earlier with help from an education agent. The academic successes of the initial students, as well as the introduction of a Chinese language program, also encouraged Farquhar to expand his school's global reach.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > "We wanted to increase awareness at our school of this very important country far away," Farquhar said.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > After his recruiting tour last year, he offered admission to 10 students. Seven accepted, including Dixi, who said goodbye to her parents and their modern high-rise apartment and moved in with a Bullis social studies teacher and her family.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Fiercely competitive education systems in East Asia are helping stoke a culture of study abroad. The number of families looking overseas for an alternate way up the career ladder has dropped in Korea recently but grown in Vietnam and boomed in China, where such students are called "xiao liu xue sheng," or "little exchange students." In the United States, they have been called "parachute kids," coming here alone to pursue their degrees.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > The financial strain for many parents is intense. Study abroad can cost tens of thousands of dollars a year for tuition and living expenses. But many consider it a reliable investment because Western degrees and English fluency are highly valued in the job market at home, said Min Zhou, a sociologist at the University of California at Los Angeles who has studied parachute kids from East Asia.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > "In China, if you fail that one exam, you are done," Zhou said, referring to the annual college entrance exam.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > English-speaking countries vie for the academically driven travelers. Canadian schools, strapped by declining enrollments, have formed an association to strengthen recruiting efforts abroad. In Australia, where international education revenue has surpassed that of tourism, specific government agencies oversee the foreign scholars.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > In the United States, public high schools charge tuition for those on student visas and limit enrollment to one year, so most attend private schools. Sandy Spring Friends School in Montgomery County has 54 foreign students, including 11 who arrived from China in January after a fall recruiting fair. Montrose Christian School in Rockville increased its foreign enrollment from about 30 students to 44 this year and appointed its first dean of international students. At Paul VI Catholic High School in Fairfax City, 31 teens have student visas, up from 13 five years ago.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Arriving alone and with limited English skills, foreign students add new and weighty responsibilities to schools. Some schools provide extensive English-language training and support; others require applicants to pass English proficiency tests or find their own housing.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > At Fairfax Christian School in Vienna, foreign students make up well over half of the high school and a quarter of the middle school. New arrivals were greeted in August with a fife and drum troupe and a barbecue on the school's front lawn. The curriculum includes courses in English as a foreign language and grounding in American culture, the Bible and free-market economics.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > The school, which charges $14,400 for tuition, plus thousands more for transportation and lodging, largely caters to Asian industrialist families, said director Jo Thoburn. Her Advanced Placement economics class last year had 23 students whose parents owned 35 factories in Asia. "This is not your typical group," she said.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Min So Kim, a 14-year-old eighth-grader from Chungbuk, South Korea, explained her parents' decision to send her to live with relatives in Haymarket this way: "My father hopes I study English very well and become a famous person."
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • david_thalheimer
      Competition among schools is exactly what I was getting at. I m less concerned with dismissing bad teachers (although we need to be able to do this) than with
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 5, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Competition among schools is exactly what I was getting at. I'm less concerned with dismissing bad teachers (although we need to be able to do this) than with providing incentives for administrators and teachers to push themselves to go beyond the "average" job performance. If school performance looks like a bell curve, I want to push the curve to the right while trimming the left-most edge. Most people need some kind of incentive, be it cash, praise, or the respect of their peers.

        I'm skeptical that individual cash performance awards will do this because it may create competition among teachers within a school for a fixed pot of money (which is limited). I'd rather see schools as a whole rewarded, while allowing the principal to decide how best to use the reward (on special programs, materials, parties, etc.).

        We can't prescribe exactly how every administrator should run his or her school, so those who find the best way to motivate their teachers and implement the best ideas should be rewarded and allowed the freedom to work their magic! Those who do not perform well will have a better example to emulate and will have to answer to their teachers, parents, HCPSS administrators and/or the Board of Ed.

        - David T

        --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "pamythompson" <pamythompson@...> wrote:
        >
        > Where I agree is that all options should be put on the table and where I agree the most is that the public should have a greater role in what our schools do . To explore hybrid programs , public / private , is probably a good idea so long as we have checks and balances so that we do not create elite areas .
        >
        > This statement concerns me . Actually , David I would like to see you expand on it .
        >
        > "Principals and teachers aren't going to work hard to attract a few extra students unless there is something in it for them. But if they personally and/or each school as a whole was rewarded for higher performance, they would have more incentive than they do now to push for better results rather than to be content with the status quo."
        >
        > The reason being is that we are not just speaking of incentives for bringing cash to the table as a private firm would do naturally but here it appears that we need to offer incentives for doing their jobs whereas in the private world nonproductive personnel are dismissed .
        >
        > Perhaps what we need is to have improvement become a competition between schools . Competition would allow some freedom to improve our schools . The competition could be broken down by the three levels of elementary , middle and high schools and even by grade K - 12 . The best ideas or programs would be implemented county wide so as to improve all schools and a cash incentive could go to each winning school . You could also do this to a lesser extent on an individual level . If you were to have a number of categories then you could have multiple winners per year which would create a balance . What you are left with is a little freelance funding and bragging rights.
        >
        > Jack
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "david_thalheimer" <dthalheimerusa@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Anything that improves the incentives for the Board of Ed and the school system to improve school performance should be a good thing. So, I don't think that charging non-resident students would be bad as long as other residents are not adversely affected (e.g. redistricted out of their school), but it isn't going to help much by itself.
        > >
        > > Principals and teachers aren't going to work hard to attract a few extra students unless there is something in it for them. But if they personally and/or each school as a whole was rewarded for higher performance, they would have more incentive than they do now to push for better results rather than to be content with the status quo.
        > >
        > > I don't know how performance is currently measured or rewarded, but I think that doing this properly is the key to improving our schools. I would like to see this information made public and include public input as part of the process.
        > >
        > > - David T
        > >
        > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "pamythompson" <pamythompson@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Bullis is an 80 acre campus on Falls rd in Potomac Md
        > > >
        > > > http://www.bullis.org/
        > > >
        > > > Look at the tuition
        > > >
        > > > The other schools in this article are in similar areas and are catering to the wealthy both here and abroad , completely diferent from what we have in public school . You need to understand the work ethic and sense of family and community these people have as well as their willingness to sacrifice . You also need to understand that the parents and grand parents of these children from places like South Korea come from a place far diferent from here , have known poverty and war which most of you have been insulated from and have very diferent views .
        > > >
        > > > No , i believe that we can improve our schools without selling them and I believe that it requires a new approach with a true and transparent partnership between the community and the syatem . Pouring money in the wrong direction is not a solution . We had years of wealth and the product our system turned out did not improve .
        > > >
        > > > Jack
        > > >
        > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "pamythompson" <pamythompson@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > I hear basicly the same as David . Primarily from Centenial , River Hill , Glenelg and a few others although it is the same throughout the country with schools that have a reputation ( based on test scores ) . I have heard this from teachers in these schools that teach AP classes , these schools are well known in places like South Korea . The families that I knew of came here legally but the entire family lived in one bedroom in a relative's apartment . I have heard of children here that live with friends but do not know their status . The issue is that these folks research what appears to be good schools and then migrate there , eventually establishing a community with similar interests .
        > > > >
        > > > > I do not think that targeting a group of people wether they come for education or work or what ever they percieve to be of importance is the right approach . What is being stressed here is that some schools are more desirable then others .
        > > > >
        > > > > Jack
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "david_thalheimer" <dthalheimerusa@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > One of my former neighbors took in the child of relatives who lived in South Korea so that the child could attend public school here. As far as I know, the parents were neither US citizens nor residents, and I don't know what legal steps they had to take to make this possible (or if it was even legal).
        > > > > >
        > > > > > - David T
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "bobrosebrough21045" <bobrosebrough21045@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > "I know that some of our public school students are foreign kids who live with relatives in the county in order to attend a good US school"
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > I am curious as to the sort of your information as it is mostly incorrect. The vast majority of the foreign born kids in our public schools (HCPSS) are here as either US citizens (born in the US) or as offspring of parents with legal immigration status. It is virtually impossible for a foreign kid to arbitrarily move to the US and live with a noncustodial relative for the purpose of attending a US school tuition free. Exceptions can be made if judgements are made by the State Department as to extenuating circumstances. Remember, the residency rules do not apply to private schools for obvious reasons. The same analogy would apply if some Jerseyite would move in with a relative to go to the U of MD as an in state sudent. Residency for tuition (at secondary and post secondary schools) is a horse of a different flavor.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "david_thalheimer" <dthalheimerusa@> wrote:
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > I know that some of our public school students are foreign kids who live with relatives in the county in order to attend a good US school. I don't know if they pay tuition. See the article below about the increase in foreign students attending US high schools. Theoretically, higher tuition for foreign students on a student visa could provide extra income for our school system to improve services to citizens. It would also be like having a funded student exchange program.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > - David T
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > U.S. prep schools push to recruit foreign students
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > By Michael Alison Chandler
        > > > > > > > The Washington Post
        > > > > > > > http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/29/AR2010032903514_pf.html
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Tuesday, March 30, 2010; B01
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > When Dixi Wu finished middle school in Kunming, China, last year, she had a hard decision to make. The skilled violinist and top-ranked student tested into one of the most competitive high schools in her province. Yet Bullis School in suburban Maryland, faced with falling applications during the depressed economy, also wanted her.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > "I'm only 15," she said. "To go all the way to the other half of the world, I was scared."
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Easing her decision was a personal interview with Bullis's headmaster, Tom Farquhar, who on his first tour of China met with dozens of students and addressed crowds of parents interested in giving their children a running start toward a prized American college diploma.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Universities and some boarding schools long have drawn heavily from overseas, but aggressive international efforts are becoming more common for other U.S. prep schools eager to recruit from among rising numbers of East Asian students capable of paying full fare. More private schools are posting ads in foreign newspapers, redesigning their Web sites in multiple languages and taking part in recruiting fairs, where they promise to provide language training and the right mix of course work and extracurricular activities to enhance college applications.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > After meeting with Farquhar, Dixi chose Bullis. Now she is reading Kurt Vonnegut in her English class, studying debate and political cartoons in history, and running track for the Bullis Bulldogs. The cost to her parents, both telecommunications executives, is close to $40,000 a year for tuition and living expenses.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > At a time when many "Made in the USA" products struggle in the global marketplace, American diplomas are more coveted than ever. More than 650,000 international students were enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities in 2009, fueling a nearly $18 billion international education industry. Federal government data show that 35,000 foreign students attend primary or secondary schools in the United States, not including one-year cultural exchange programs or short-term language courses.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > For American private schools, the rising interest from East Asia comes at a key moment. The recession has forced many U.S. families to reconsider whether they can afford the costs of tuition and lodging. Charitable giving and endowments also have suffered. Many schools are grappling with fewer applications and, in the worst cases, the possibility of closure.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Bullis was not in such dire straits, school officials said, but applications from U.S. students dipped last year, while demand was up in China. The Potomac school, on an 80-acre wooded campus, started admitting students from China several years earlier with help from an education agent. The academic successes of the initial students, as well as the introduction of a Chinese language program, also encouraged Farquhar to expand his school's global reach.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > "We wanted to increase awareness at our school of this very important country far away," Farquhar said.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > After his recruiting tour last year, he offered admission to 10 students. Seven accepted, including Dixi, who said goodbye to her parents and their modern high-rise apartment and moved in with a Bullis social studies teacher and her family.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Fiercely competitive education systems in East Asia are helping stoke a culture of study abroad. The number of families looking overseas for an alternate way up the career ladder has dropped in Korea recently but grown in Vietnam and boomed in China, where such students are called "xiao liu xue sheng," or "little exchange students." In the United States, they have been called "parachute kids," coming here alone to pursue their degrees.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > The financial strain for many parents is intense. Study abroad can cost tens of thousands of dollars a year for tuition and living expenses. But many consider it a reliable investment because Western degrees and English fluency are highly valued in the job market at home, said Min Zhou, a sociologist at the University of California at Los Angeles who has studied parachute kids from East Asia.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > "In China, if you fail that one exam, you are done," Zhou said, referring to the annual college entrance exam.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > English-speaking countries vie for the academically driven travelers. Canadian schools, strapped by declining enrollments, have formed an association to strengthen recruiting efforts abroad. In Australia, where international education revenue has surpassed that of tourism, specific government agencies oversee the foreign scholars.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > In the United States, public high schools charge tuition for those on student visas and limit enrollment to one year, so most attend private schools. Sandy Spring Friends School in Montgomery County has 54 foreign students, including 11 who arrived from China in January after a fall recruiting fair. Montrose Christian School in Rockville increased its foreign enrollment from about 30 students to 44 this year and appointed its first dean of international students. At Paul VI Catholic High School in Fairfax City, 31 teens have student visas, up from 13 five years ago.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Arriving alone and with limited English skills, foreign students add new and weighty responsibilities to schools. Some schools provide extensive English-language training and support; others require applicants to pass English proficiency tests or find their own housing.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > At Fairfax Christian School in Vienna, foreign students make up well over half of the high school and a quarter of the middle school. New arrivals were greeted in August with a fife and drum troupe and a barbecue on the school's front lawn. The curriculum includes courses in English as a foreign language and grounding in American culture, the Bible and free-market economics.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > The school, which charges $14,400 for tuition, plus thousands more for transportation and lodging, largely caters to Asian industrialist families, said director Jo Thoburn. Her Advanced Placement economics class last year had 23 students whose parents owned 35 factories in Asia. "This is not your typical group," she said.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > Min So Kim, a 14-year-old eighth-grader from Chungbuk, South Korea, explained her parents' decision to send her to live with relatives in Haymarket this way: "My father hopes I study English very well and become a famous person."
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • pamythompson
        I believe you have some good ideas . The question now becomes how do we involve more people and begin implementing these ideas so as to bring about positive
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 15, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          I believe you have some good ideas . The question now becomes how do we involve more people and begin implementing these ideas so as to bring about positive change for our children ? I will be quite honest with you , those of you with young children , if you begin now you may see some improvement before they graduate .

          Jack

          --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "david_thalheimer" <dthalheimerusa@...> wrote:
          >
          > Competition among schools is exactly what I was getting at. I'm less concerned with dismissing bad teachers (although we need to be able to do this) than with providing incentives for administrators and teachers to push themselves to go beyond the "average" job performance. If school performance looks like a bell curve, I want to push the curve to the right while trimming the left-most edge. Most people need some kind of incentive, be it cash, praise, or the respect of their peers.
          >
          > I'm skeptical that individual cash performance awards will do this because it may create competition among teachers within a school for a fixed pot of money (which is limited). I'd rather see schools as a whole rewarded, while allowing the principal to decide how best to use the reward (on special programs, materials, parties, etc.).
          >
          > We can't prescribe exactly how every administrator should run his or her school, so those who find the best way to motivate their teachers and implement the best ideas should be rewarded and allowed the freedom to work their magic! Those who do not perform well will have a better example to emulate and will have to answer to their teachers, parents, HCPSS administrators and/or the Board of Ed.
          >
          > - David T
          >
          > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "pamythompson" <pamythompson@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Where I agree is that all options should be put on the table and where I agree the most is that the public should have a greater role in what our schools do . To explore hybrid programs , public / private , is probably a good idea so long as we have checks and balances so that we do not create elite areas .
          > >
          > > This statement concerns me . Actually , David I would like to see you expand on it .
          > >
          > > "Principals and teachers aren't going to work hard to attract a few extra students unless there is something in it for them. But if they personally and/or each school as a whole was rewarded for higher performance, they would have more incentive than they do now to push for better results rather than to be content with the status quo."
          > >
          > > The reason being is that we are not just speaking of incentives for bringing cash to the table as a private firm would do naturally but here it appears that we need to offer incentives for doing their jobs whereas in the private world nonproductive personnel are dismissed .
          > >
          > > Perhaps what we need is to have improvement become a competition between schools . Competition would allow some freedom to improve our schools . The competition could be broken down by the three levels of elementary , middle and high schools and even by grade K - 12 . The best ideas or programs would be implemented county wide so as to improve all schools and a cash incentive could go to each winning school . You could also do this to a lesser extent on an individual level . If you were to have a number of categories then you could have multiple winners per year which would create a balance . What you are left with is a little freelance funding and bragging rights.
          > >
          > > Jack
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "david_thalheimer" <dthalheimerusa@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Anything that improves the incentives for the Board of Ed and the school system to improve school performance should be a good thing. So, I don't think that charging non-resident students would be bad as long as other residents are not adversely affected (e.g. redistricted out of their school), but it isn't going to help much by itself.
          > > >
          > > > Principals and teachers aren't going to work hard to attract a few extra students unless there is something in it for them. But if they personally and/or each school as a whole was rewarded for higher performance, they would have more incentive than they do now to push for better results rather than to be content with the status quo.
          > > >
          > > > I don't know how performance is currently measured or rewarded, but I think that doing this properly is the key to improving our schools. I would like to see this information made public and include public input as part of the process.
          > > >
          > > > - David T
          > > >
          > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "pamythompson" <pamythompson@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > Bullis is an 80 acre campus on Falls rd in Potomac Md
          > > > >
          > > > > http://www.bullis.org/
          > > > >
          > > > > Look at the tuition
          > > > >
          > > > > The other schools in this article are in similar areas and are catering to the wealthy both here and abroad , completely diferent from what we have in public school . You need to understand the work ethic and sense of family and community these people have as well as their willingness to sacrifice . You also need to understand that the parents and grand parents of these children from places like South Korea come from a place far diferent from here , have known poverty and war which most of you have been insulated from and have very diferent views .
          > > > >
          > > > > No , i believe that we can improve our schools without selling them and I believe that it requires a new approach with a true and transparent partnership between the community and the syatem . Pouring money in the wrong direction is not a solution . We had years of wealth and the product our system turned out did not improve .
          > > > >
          > > > > Jack
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "pamythompson" <pamythompson@> wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > I hear basicly the same as David . Primarily from Centenial , River Hill , Glenelg and a few others although it is the same throughout the country with schools that have a reputation ( based on test scores ) . I have heard this from teachers in these schools that teach AP classes , these schools are well known in places like South Korea . The families that I knew of came here legally but the entire family lived in one bedroom in a relative's apartment . I have heard of children here that live with friends but do not know their status . The issue is that these folks research what appears to be good schools and then migrate there , eventually establishing a community with similar interests .
          > > > > >
          > > > > > I do not think that targeting a group of people wether they come for education or work or what ever they percieve to be of importance is the right approach . What is being stressed here is that some schools are more desirable then others .
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Jack
          > > > > >
          > > > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "david_thalheimer" <dthalheimerusa@> wrote:
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > One of my former neighbors took in the child of relatives who lived in South Korea so that the child could attend public school here. As far as I know, the parents were neither US citizens nor residents, and I don't know what legal steps they had to take to make this possible (or if it was even legal).
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > - David T
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "bobrosebrough21045" <bobrosebrough21045@> wrote:
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > "I know that some of our public school students are foreign kids who live with relatives in the county in order to attend a good US school"
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > I am curious as to the sort of your information as it is mostly incorrect. The vast majority of the foreign born kids in our public schools (HCPSS) are here as either US citizens (born in the US) or as offspring of parents with legal immigration status. It is virtually impossible for a foreign kid to arbitrarily move to the US and live with a noncustodial relative for the purpose of attending a US school tuition free. Exceptions can be made if judgements are made by the State Department as to extenuating circumstances. Remember, the residency rules do not apply to private schools for obvious reasons. The same analogy would apply if some Jerseyite would move in with a relative to go to the U of MD as an in state sudent. Residency for tuition (at secondary and post secondary schools) is a horse of a different flavor.
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "david_thalheimer" <dthalheimerusa@> wrote:
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > I know that some of our public school students are foreign kids who live with relatives in the county in order to attend a good US school. I don't know if they pay tuition. See the article below about the increase in foreign students attending US high schools. Theoretically, higher tuition for foreign students on a student visa could provide extra income for our school system to improve services to citizens. It would also be like having a funded student exchange program.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > - David T
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > U.S. prep schools push to recruit foreign students
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > By Michael Alison Chandler
          > > > > > > > > The Washington Post
          > > > > > > > > http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/29/AR2010032903514_pf.html
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > Tuesday, March 30, 2010; B01
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > When Dixi Wu finished middle school in Kunming, China, last year, she had a hard decision to make. The skilled violinist and top-ranked student tested into one of the most competitive high schools in her province. Yet Bullis School in suburban Maryland, faced with falling applications during the depressed economy, also wanted her.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > "I'm only 15," she said. "To go all the way to the other half of the world, I was scared."
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > Easing her decision was a personal interview with Bullis's headmaster, Tom Farquhar, who on his first tour of China met with dozens of students and addressed crowds of parents interested in giving their children a running start toward a prized American college diploma.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > Universities and some boarding schools long have drawn heavily from overseas, but aggressive international efforts are becoming more common for other U.S. prep schools eager to recruit from among rising numbers of East Asian students capable of paying full fare. More private schools are posting ads in foreign newspapers, redesigning their Web sites in multiple languages and taking part in recruiting fairs, where they promise to provide language training and the right mix of course work and extracurricular activities to enhance college applications.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > After meeting with Farquhar, Dixi chose Bullis. Now she is reading Kurt Vonnegut in her English class, studying debate and political cartoons in history, and running track for the Bullis Bulldogs. The cost to her parents, both telecommunications executives, is close to $40,000 a year for tuition and living expenses.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > At a time when many "Made in the USA" products struggle in the global marketplace, American diplomas are more coveted than ever. More than 650,000 international students were enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities in 2009, fueling a nearly $18 billion international education industry. Federal government data show that 35,000 foreign students attend primary or secondary schools in the United States, not including one-year cultural exchange programs or short-term language courses.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > For American private schools, the rising interest from East Asia comes at a key moment. The recession has forced many U.S. families to reconsider whether they can afford the costs of tuition and lodging. Charitable giving and endowments also have suffered. Many schools are grappling with fewer applications and, in the worst cases, the possibility of closure.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > Bullis was not in such dire straits, school officials said, but applications from U.S. students dipped last year, while demand was up in China. The Potomac school, on an 80-acre wooded campus, started admitting students from China several years earlier with help from an education agent. The academic successes of the initial students, as well as the introduction of a Chinese language program, also encouraged Farquhar to expand his school's global reach.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > "We wanted to increase awareness at our school of this very important country far away," Farquhar said.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > After his recruiting tour last year, he offered admission to 10 students. Seven accepted, including Dixi, who said goodbye to her parents and their modern high-rise apartment and moved in with a Bullis social studies teacher and her family.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > Fiercely competitive education systems in East Asia are helping stoke a culture of study abroad. The number of families looking overseas for an alternate way up the career ladder has dropped in Korea recently but grown in Vietnam and boomed in China, where such students are called "xiao liu xue sheng," or "little exchange students." In the United States, they have been called "parachute kids," coming here alone to pursue their degrees.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > The financial strain for many parents is intense. Study abroad can cost tens of thousands of dollars a year for tuition and living expenses. But many consider it a reliable investment because Western degrees and English fluency are highly valued in the job market at home, said Min Zhou, a sociologist at the University of California at Los Angeles who has studied parachute kids from East Asia.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > "In China, if you fail that one exam, you are done," Zhou said, referring to the annual college entrance exam.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > English-speaking countries vie for the academically driven travelers. Canadian schools, strapped by declining enrollments, have formed an association to strengthen recruiting efforts abroad. In Australia, where international education revenue has surpassed that of tourism, specific government agencies oversee the foreign scholars.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > In the United States, public high schools charge tuition for those on student visas and limit enrollment to one year, so most attend private schools. Sandy Spring Friends School in Montgomery County has 54 foreign students, including 11 who arrived from China in January after a fall recruiting fair. Montrose Christian School in Rockville increased its foreign enrollment from about 30 students to 44 this year and appointed its first dean of international students. At Paul VI Catholic High School in Fairfax City, 31 teens have student visas, up from 13 five years ago.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > Arriving alone and with limited English skills, foreign students add new and weighty responsibilities to schools. Some schools provide extensive English-language training and support; others require applicants to pass English proficiency tests or find their own housing.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > At Fairfax Christian School in Vienna, foreign students make up well over half of the high school and a quarter of the middle school. New arrivals were greeted in August with a fife and drum troupe and a barbecue on the school's front lawn. The curriculum includes courses in English as a foreign language and grounding in American culture, the Bible and free-market economics.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > The school, which charges $14,400 for tuition, plus thousands more for transportation and lodging, largely caters to Asian industrialist families, said director Jo Thoburn. Her Advanced Placement economics class last year had 23 students whose parents owned 35 factories in Asia. "This is not your typical group," she said.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > Min So Kim, a 14-year-old eighth-grader from Chungbuk, South Korea, explained her parents' decision to send her to live with relatives in Haymarket this way: "My father hopes I study English very well and become a famous person."
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
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