Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: beware the number crunchers....Re: [howardpubliced] Projections forecast school crowding:

Expand Messages
  • Roger Lerner
    Ray, I missed this. Big school, small lunch room? New school? Design brilliance? Is the lunch room too small or are they just mismanaging the food service?
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 26, 2008

      Ray,

       

      I missed this.   Big school, small lunch room?  New school? Design brilliance?    

       

      Is the lunch room too small or are they just  mismanaging the food service?

       

       

       

      Roger J. Lerner

       

      (o) 410-750-6907

      (f)  410-750-6909

      (m) 202-262-0420

       

       

       


      From: howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com [mailto:howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ray Lischner
      Sent: Monday, June 23, 2008 10:15 PM
      To: howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: beware the number crunchers....Re: [howardpubliced] Projections forecast school crowding:

       

      On Monday 23 June 2008 12:20 pm, Allen Dyer wrote:

      > i doubt that the spreadsheets
      > used by the central office planners were sophisticated enough
      > to take into account the impact of school size on the students'
      > educational environment.  788 students in an elementary school
      > is obscene.

      I do not know how the school district quantified educational environment
      when they did they calculations.

      On the one hand, I agree that 788 is a large number of students for an
      elementary school. Of the three elementary schools I attended (not
      because I moved, but because my community underwent rapid growth, and I
      moved from school to school as fast as the school district could build
      them--sound familiar?), two were half that size. I don't remember size
      of the third, but I suspect it was larger. (I later attended the same
      school after it was reconfigured as a junior high. It was large enough
      to hold grades 7 and 8 for one third of the school district, or about 7
      elementary schools feeding into it.)

      On the other hand, a smaller school has more limited opportunities. Only
      the large school had a separate gym; the others used a single
      all-purpose room as gym, cafeteria, and more. We did not have a
      separate music room, or any room for G-T or other enrichment classes.

      That said, when i had a choice of universities, I picked the smaller
      one, in large part because it was smaller. (Freshman class size of
      about 220 students; my second choice school was about 1000 students in
      each class.) Sometimes, smaller is better.

      The teachers that I have witnessed do an excellent job at managing their
      classes, even if there are six such classes in the grade. The biggest
      problem I've personally witnessed in regards to a large school is
      lunch. In my son's school, they get 30 minutes for lunch. If you want
      to buy lunch, the kids spend as much as 20 minutes standing in line to
      get lunch simply because there are too many kids and the lunch room is
      too small. My son would then drink the milk, eat a little bit, and
      throw the rest away because recess was more important to him than
      lunch. (Last year, 100 students were redistricted out of the school; at
      the same time, we started packing a lunch, so I can't say whether the
      smaller school size has addressed this problem.)
      --
      Ray Lischner

    • debra21794
      Waaaay back when I was in elementary school and we had ONE teacher per class, I know there were students who could not focus because of the drone of the
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 26, 2008
        Waaaay back when I was in elementary school and we had ONE teacher per
        class, I know there were students who could not focus because of the
        drone of the teacher's voice put the students to sleep. I think
        having two teachers in the room will enliven the instruction (kind of
        like the local evening news when there are two anchors on TV).

        I would have loved to have had a second teacher in the room to help me
        get over the humps in learning the more challenging lessons.

        I would have also loved having a second teacher who could have given
        me more challenging work to do at my seat when the lessons were too
        easy for me.

        What an ideal world that would have been!
        Debra

        --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, Roger Lerner <RLerner@...> wrote:
        >
        > In this instance the data is clear; co-teaching appears to be the
        single most effective method of improving learning and performance
        since the invention of the alphabet. What occurs, as I understand it,
        is that one teacher professes the lesson while the other move around
        the room assisting students with the work being taught, thus solving
        the problem a single teacher faces of not being able to be two places
        at once.
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.