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Re: the DARE program

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  • rit21042
    No they were taught that police officers weren t particularly bright. My sons DARE officer considered the caffeine in Coke as much a drug as marijuana or
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 1, 2003
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      No they were taught that police officers weren't particularly
      bright. My sons DARE officer considered the caffeine in Coke as much
      a drug as marijuana or heroin & made a big deal about how she didn't
      drink Coke because it was a drug. Kids aren't stupid, when adults
      say stupid things, it devalues any useful information they may be
      giving out.
      RIT

      --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, steve-jen l swanhart
      <sjswanhart@j...> wrote:
      > At least when the kids are coloring and making posters they aren't
      doing
      > drugs right?
      > Steve
      > On Tue, 01 Jul 2003 00:11:53 -0000 "rit21042" <athierer@e...>
      > writes:
      > > There was an article in today's Sun about the elimination of the
      DARE
      > >
      > > program in AA Co. The article said that the AA Co DARE program
      was
      > >
      > > one of the last programs around, and HoCo had already eliminated
      > > theirs. Doe anyone remember when DARE was eliminated in HoCo.
      Not
      > >
      > > that I am complaining, DARE was a waste of time.
      > > RIT
      > >
      > >
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    • joan_pontius
      Caffeine is more addictive than marijuana. Same with sugar. The difference is that our society says drugs are ok if it makes you a more useful (read
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 1, 2003
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        Caffeine is more addictive than marijuana.
        Same with sugar.
        The difference is that our society says drugs are ok
        if it makes you a more 'useful'
        (read productive) member of society.
        So we don't let kids smoke cigarettes or
        pot or drink alcohol, but we feed them coke to help
        fund schools and then pump them with pills
        to make them sit still and study.



        --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "rit21042" <athierer@e...> wrote:
        > No they were taught that police officers weren't particularly
        > bright. My sons DARE officer considered the caffeine in Coke as much
        > a drug as marijuana or heroin & made a big deal about how she didn't
        > drink Coke because it was a drug. Kids aren't stupid, when adults
        > say stupid things, it devalues any useful information they may be
        > giving out.
        > RIT
      • bobrosebrough21045
        There is no evidence that either caffeine or sucrose meet one of the constituitive definitions of addictive compunds (stimulation or inhibition either the
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 1, 2003
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          There is no evidence that either caffeine or sucrose meet one of the
          constituitive definitions of addictive compunds (stimulation or
          inhibition either the dopamine ot serotonin pathways in the central
          nervous system). It is currently in vogue to classify something as
          addictive to raise that behavior to some sort of medical pathology
          (ie gambling or Bill Clinton's sex habits). Compulsions (the free
          lunch in gambling or excess sugar intakes) just don't raise the
          concept of a victim.

          BobR
          No such thing as stong coffee

          --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "joan_pontius"
          <joan_pontius@y...> wrote:
          >
          > Caffeine is more addictive than marijuana.
          > Same with sugar.
          > The difference is that our society says drugs are ok
          > if it makes you a more 'useful'
          > (read productive) member of society.
          > So we don't let kids smoke cigarettes or
          > pot or drink alcohol, but we feed them coke to help
          > fund schools and then pump them with pills
          > to make them sit still and study.
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "rit21042" <athierer@e...>
          wrote:
          > > No they were taught that police officers weren't particularly
          > > bright. My sons DARE officer considered the caffeine in Coke as
          much
          > > a drug as marijuana or heroin & made a big deal about how she
          didn't
          > > drink Coke because it was a drug. Kids aren't stupid, when
          adults
          > > say stupid things, it devalues any useful information they may be
          > > giving out.
          > > RIT
        • joan_pontius
          Differential effects of caffeine on dopamine and acetylcholine transmission in brain areas of drug-naive and caffeine-pretreated rats. Acquas E, Tanda G, Di
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 1, 2003
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            Differential effects of caffeine on dopamine and acetylcholine
            transmission in brain areas of drug-naive and caffeine-pretreated rats.

            Acquas E, Tanda G, Di Chiara G.

            Department of Toxicology, University of Cagliari, and Centre for
            Neuropharmacology - CNR, Via Ospedale72, I-09124, Cagliari, Italy.

            The effects of caffeine on extracellular dopamine and acetylcholine
            have been studied in freely moving rats implanted with concentric
            microdialysis probes in the nucleus accumbens shell and core and in
            the medial prefrontal cortex. Intravenous administration of caffeine
            (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased
            dopamine and acetylcholine dialysate concentrations in the medial
            prefrontal cortex, while it did not affect dialysate dopamine in the
            shell and core of the nucleus accumbens. Intraperitoneal
            administration of caffeine (1.5, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg) also failed to
            affect DA in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens. Such effects
            were duplicated by intravenous administration of DPCPX, a selective
            antagonist of adenosine A1 receptors, and of SCH 58261, an antagonist
            of A2a receptors. The effect of caffeine on prefrontal dopamine and
            acetylcholine transmission was also studied in rats chronically
            administered with caffeine (25 mg/kg, twice a day for seven days). At
            the end of this treatment rats became tolerant to the locomotor
            stimulating effects of a dose of 1 and 2.5 mg/kg i.v. of caffeine;
            these doses, however, still increased dialysate acetylcholine but did
            not affect dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. Therefore, in rats made
            tolerant to the locomotor stimulant effects of caffeine, tolerance
            developed to the dopamine stimulant but not to the acetylcholine
            stimulant effect of caffeine in the prefrontal cortex. The lack of
            acute stimulation of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell
            by caffeine is relevant to the issue of its addictive properties and
            of the role of DA in drug- and substance-addiction. On the other hand,
            the dissociation between tolerance to the locomotor effects of
            caffeine and stimulation of acetylcholine release in the prefrontal
            cortex suggests that this effect might be correlated to the arousing
            effects of caffeine as distinct from its locomotor stimulant properties.



            --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "bobrosebrough21045"
            <bobrosebrough21045@y...> wrote:
            > There is no evidence that either caffeine or sucrose meet one of the
            > constituitive definitions of addictive compunds (stimulation or
            > inhibition either the dopamine ot serotonin pathways in the central
            > nervous system). It is currently in vogue to classify something as
            > addictive to raise that behavior to some sort of medical pathology
            > (ie gambling or Bill Clinton's sex habits). Compulsions (the free
            > lunch in gambling or excess sugar intakes) just don't raise the
            > concept of a victim.
            >
            > BobR
            > No such thing as stong coffee
            >
            > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "joan_pontius"
            > <joan_pontius@y...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Caffeine is more addictive than marijuana.
            > > Same with sugar.
            > > The difference is that our society says drugs are ok
            > > if it makes you a more 'useful'
            > > (read productive) member of society.
            > > So we don't let kids smoke cigarettes or
            > > pot or drink alcohol, but we feed them coke to help
            > > fund schools and then pump them with pills
            > > to make them sit still and study.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "rit21042" <athierer@e...>
            > wrote:
            > > > No they were taught that police officers weren't particularly
            > > > bright. My sons DARE officer considered the caffeine in Coke as
            > much
            > > > a drug as marijuana or heroin & made a big deal about how she
            > didn't
            > > > drink Coke because it was a drug. Kids aren't stupid, when
            > adults
            > > > say stupid things, it devalues any useful information they may be
            > > > giving out.
            > > > RIT
          • bobrosebrough21045
            The lack of acute stimulation of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell by caffeine is relevant to the issue of its addictive properties and of the
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 1, 2003
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              "The lack of acute stimulation of dopamine release in the nucleus
              accumbens shell by caffeine is relevant to the issue of its addictive
              properties and of the role of DA in drug- and substance-addiction. "

              --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "joan_pontius"
              <joan_pontius@y...> wrote:
              > Differential effects of caffeine on dopamine and acetylcholine
              > transmission in brain areas of drug-naive and caffeine-pretreated
              rats.
              >
              > Acquas E, Tanda G, Di Chiara G.
              >
              > Department of Toxicology, University of Cagliari, and Centre for
              > Neuropharmacology - CNR, Via Ospedale72, I-09124, Cagliari, Italy.
              >
              > The effects of caffeine on extracellular dopamine and acetylcholine
              > have been studied in freely moving rats implanted with concentric
              > microdialysis probes in the nucleus accumbens shell and core and in
              > the medial prefrontal cortex. Intravenous administration of caffeine
              > (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased
              > dopamine and acetylcholine dialysate concentrations in the medial
              > prefrontal cortex, while it did not affect dialysate dopamine in the
              > shell and core of the nucleus accumbens. Intraperitoneal
              > administration of caffeine (1.5, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg) also failed to
              > affect DA in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens. Such
              effects
              > were duplicated by intravenous administration of DPCPX, a selective
              > antagonist of adenosine A1 receptors, and of SCH 58261, an
              antagonist
              > of A2a receptors. The effect of caffeine on prefrontal dopamine and
              > acetylcholine transmission was also studied in rats chronically
              > administered with caffeine (25 mg/kg, twice a day for seven days).
              At
              > the end of this treatment rats became tolerant to the locomotor
              > stimulating effects of a dose of 1 and 2.5 mg/kg i.v. of caffeine;
              > these doses, however, still increased dialysate acetylcholine but
              did
              > not affect dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. Therefore, in rats
              made
              > tolerant to the locomotor stimulant effects of caffeine, tolerance
              > developed to the dopamine stimulant but not to the acetylcholine
              > stimulant effect of caffeine in the prefrontal cortex. The lack of
              > acute stimulation of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell
              > by caffeine is relevant to the issue of its addictive properties and
              > of the role of DA in drug- and substance-addiction. On the other
              hand,
              > the dissociation between tolerance to the locomotor effects of
              > caffeine and stimulation of acetylcholine release in the prefrontal
              > cortex suggests that this effect might be correlated to the arousing
              > effects of caffeine as distinct from its locomotor stimulant
              properties.
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "bobrosebrough21045"
              > <bobrosebrough21045@y...> wrote:
              > > There is no evidence that either caffeine or sucrose meet one of
              the
              > > constituitive definitions of addictive compunds (stimulation or
              > > inhibition either the dopamine ot serotonin pathways in the
              central
              > > nervous system). It is currently in vogue to classify something
              as
              > > addictive to raise that behavior to some sort of medical
              pathology
              > > (ie gambling or Bill Clinton's sex habits). Compulsions (the
              free
              > > lunch in gambling or excess sugar intakes) just don't raise the
              > > concept of a victim.
              > >
              > > BobR
              > > No such thing as stong coffee
              > >
              > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "joan_pontius"
              > > <joan_pontius@y...> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Caffeine is more addictive than marijuana.
              > > > Same with sugar.
              > > > The difference is that our society says drugs are ok
              > > > if it makes you a more 'useful'
              > > > (read productive) member of society.
              > > > So we don't let kids smoke cigarettes or
              > > > pot or drink alcohol, but we feed them coke to help
              > > > fund schools and then pump them with pills
              > > > to make them sit still and study.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "rit21042"
              <athierer@e...>
              > > wrote:
              > > > > No they were taught that police officers weren't particularly
              > > > > bright. My sons DARE officer considered the caffeine in Coke
              as
              > > much
              > > > > a drug as marijuana or heroin & made a big deal about how she
              > > didn't
              > > > > drink Coke because it was a drug. Kids aren't stupid, when
              > > adults
              > > > > say stupid things, it devalues any useful information they
              may be
              > > > > giving out.
              > > > > RIT
            • joanpontius
              Intravenous administration of caffeine
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 1, 2003
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                Intravenous administration of caffeine
                > > (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased
                > > dopamine and acetylcholine dialysate concentrations in the medial
                > > prefrontal cortex, while it did not affect dialysate dopamine in the
                > > shell and core of the nucleus accumbens.





                --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "bobrosebrough21045"
                <bobrosebrough21045@y...> wrote:
                > "The lack of acute stimulation of dopamine release in the nucleus
                > accumbens shell by caffeine is relevant to the issue of its addictive
                > properties and of the role of DA in drug- and substance-addiction. "
                >
                > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "joan_pontius"
                > <joan_pontius@y...> wrote:
                > > Differential effects of caffeine on dopamine and acetylcholine
                > > transmission in brain areas of drug-naive and caffeine-pretreated
                > rats.
                > >
                > > Acquas E, Tanda G, Di Chiara G.
                > >
                > > Department of Toxicology, University of Cagliari, and Centre for
                > > Neuropharmacology - CNR, Via Ospedale72, I-09124, Cagliari, Italy.
                > >
                > > The effects of caffeine on extracellular dopamine and acetylcholine
                > > have been studied in freely moving rats implanted with concentric
                > > microdialysis probes in the nucleus accumbens shell and core and in
                > > the medial prefrontal cortex. Intravenous administration of caffeine
                > > (0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased
                > > dopamine and acetylcholine dialysate concentrations in the medial
                > > prefrontal cortex, while it did not affect dialysate dopamine in the
                > > shell and core of the nucleus accumbens. Intraperitoneal
                > > administration of caffeine (1.5, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg) also failed to
                > > affect DA in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens. Such
                > effects
                > > were duplicated by intravenous administration of DPCPX, a selective
                > > antagonist of adenosine A1 receptors, and of SCH 58261, an
                > antagonist
                > > of A2a receptors. The effect of caffeine on prefrontal dopamine and
                > > acetylcholine transmission was also studied in rats chronically
                > > administered with caffeine (25 mg/kg, twice a day for seven days).
                > At
                > > the end of this treatment rats became tolerant to the locomotor
                > > stimulating effects of a dose of 1 and 2.5 mg/kg i.v. of caffeine;
                > > these doses, however, still increased dialysate acetylcholine but
                > did
                > > not affect dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. Therefore, in rats
                > made
                > > tolerant to the locomotor stimulant effects of caffeine, tolerance
                > > developed to the dopamine stimulant but not to the acetylcholine
                > > stimulant effect of caffeine in the prefrontal cortex. The lack of
                > > acute stimulation of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell
                > > by caffeine is relevant to the issue of its addictive properties and
                > > of the role of DA in drug- and substance-addiction. On the other
                > hand,
                > > the dissociation between tolerance to the locomotor effects of
                > > caffeine and stimulation of acetylcholine release in the prefrontal
                > > cortex suggests that this effect might be correlated to the arousing
                > > effects of caffeine as distinct from its locomotor stimulant
                > properties.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "bobrosebrough21045"
                > > <bobrosebrough21045@y...> wrote:
                > > > There is no evidence that either caffeine or sucrose meet one of
                > the
                > > > constituitive definitions of addictive compunds (stimulation or
                > > > inhibition either the dopamine ot serotonin pathways in the
                > central
                > > > nervous system). It is currently in vogue to classify something
                > as
                > > > addictive to raise that behavior to some sort of medical
                > pathology
                > > > (ie gambling or Bill Clinton's sex habits). Compulsions (the
                > free
                > > > lunch in gambling or excess sugar intakes) just don't raise the
                > > > concept of a victim.
                > > >
                > > > BobR
                > > > No such thing as stong coffee
                > > >
                > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "joan_pontius"
                > > > <joan_pontius@y...> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Caffeine is more addictive than marijuana.
                > > > > Same with sugar.
                > > > > The difference is that our society says drugs are ok
                > > > > if it makes you a more 'useful'
                > > > > (read productive) member of society.
                > > > > So we don't let kids smoke cigarettes or
                > > > > pot or drink alcohol, but we feed them coke to help
                > > > > fund schools and then pump them with pills
                > > > > to make them sit still and study.
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, "rit21042"
                > <athierer@e...>
                > > > wrote:
                > > > > > No they were taught that police officers weren't particularly
                > > > > > bright. My sons DARE officer considered the caffeine in Coke
                > as
                > > > much
                > > > > > a drug as marijuana or heroin & made a big deal about how she
                > > > didn't
                > > > > > drink Coke because it was a drug. Kids aren't stupid, when
                > > > adults
                > > > > > say stupid things, it devalues any useful information they
                > may be
                > > > > > giving out.
                > > > > > RIT
              • joanpontius
                so maybe next time they ll fund art programs instead of intimidation programs.
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 2, 2003
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                  so maybe next time they'll
                  fund art programs instead of
                  intimidation programs.


                  --- In howardpubliced@yahoogroups.com, steve-jen l swanhart
                  <sjswanhart@j...> wrote:
                  > At least when the kids are coloring and making posters they aren't doing
                  > drugs right?
                  > Steve
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