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Free market (was Re: parochial schools vs Howard County public schools

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  • joan_pontius
    ... sounds ... 2nd ... and ... why don t we switch over to a free market and have each parent pay for their own kids education. If parents can t afford it, we
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 1, 2002
      --- In howardpubliced@y..., steve&jen swanhart <sjswanhart@j...>
      wrote:
      > Well at least they don't only leave out the special Ed kids. That
      sounds
      > like balance to me. My daughter was starting some basic algebra in
      2nd
      > grade. The problem seems to be that Catholic schools have there pace
      and
      > if its not your kids pace SOL. You just have to deal with it or
      > leave(free market).
      > Steve



      why don't we switch over to a free market
      and have each parent pay for their own kids' education.
      If parents can't afford it, we can
      send their kids back to the factories, or put them
      in for profit orphanages. Afterall, why should we trust
      the government spending our money when we can
      spent it perfectly well ourselves. It's just not
      efficient.
    • steve&jen swanhart
      Joan, Last time i looked factory workers were paid more than jobs at the mall or McDonalds which is what they have now!! Steve
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 1, 2002
        Joan,
        Last time i looked factory workers were paid more than jobs at the mall
        or McDonalds which is what they have now!!
        Steve
        Joan wrote:
        > why don't we switch over to a free market
        > and have each parent pay for their own kids' education.
        > If parents can't afford it, we can
        > send their kids back to the factories, or put them
        > in for profit orphanages. After all, why should we trust
        > the government spending our money when we can
        > spent it perfectly well ourselves. It's just not
        > efficient.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • RGoodri973@aol.com
        Steve, Joan, Becky and the others have a valid point. Free market education (as you define it) is doomed for failure. That s because it s inherently a
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 1, 2002
          Steve,

          Joan, Becky and the others have a valid point.  "Free market education" (as you define it) is doomed for failure.  That's because it's inherently a government (and hence, regulated) function -- as it SHOULD be. 

          I think our forefathers would cringe at the free market education concept.  Think of Thomas Jefferson and his establishment of the University of Virginia -- he founded that school based on the premise that it would be education for the masses, not just the privileged landed-gentry like all other universities at that time.  He was a visionary; he wanted an education for all -- not just for the wealthy.
          Diane
          --------------------------------------
          http://www.law.cornell.edu/topics/education.html
          education law: an overview

          One government function is education, which is administered through the public school system by the department of education. The states, therefore, have primary responsibility for the maintenance and operation of public schools. The Federal Government also has an interest in education. The National Institute of Education was created to improve education in the United States. Each state is required by its state constitution to provide a school system whereby children may receive an education. State legislatures exercise power over schools in any manner consistent with the state's constitution. Many state legislatures delegate power over the school system to a state board of education. There is a strong concern with equality in education. Within states this leads to efforts to assure that each child no matter where he or she is situated receives an adequate education. The Equal Education Opportunities Act of 1974 provides that no state shall deny equal educational opportunity to an individual on the basis of race, color, sex, or national origin.

          Parents have a fundamental right to direct the education of their children, including the right to choose a private school. However, states have the power to regulate private schools. That power is limited because the majority of private schools are religious institutions. The U.S. Constitution restricts public funding of private schools. Consequently, there have been numerous Supreme Court opinions delineating the bounds of what is and is not public funding.

          For children with disabilities special education is available. To qualify for special education a child's disability must adversely affect the child's educational performance. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. ยงยง 1400 et seq) establishes a process for evaluating a child's special needs and for providing an individualized education program. The Federal Act is binding on all states. In addition, most states have their own laws which parallel the Act. Under the Act, parents and families of special education children have specific rights such as the right to inspect the child's school records.

          Lastly, homeschooling is an option for some families. Homeschooling is legal in all fifty states, but it requires a large time commitment on the part of the family. In some states parents need to register their intent to homeschool with the department of education or the local district school board. In addition, many states require yearly proof of progress. States do not provide many services to homeschools, though some allow students to attend public school classes and to participate in public school activities.
          ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Becky said (6-28-02):
          A whole lot of kids opted out of Lawrence ( a city with a large non-English speaking, low income, minority population).  So many kids opted out, there weren't enough funds to run the school district.  The state had to step in with emergency funding.  So while in THEORY, depriving schools with money will bring incentive to improve the schools, in practice it's not true.  It doesn't work like your typical market economy. Less money means less resources for the kids left behind, leaving them worse off than ever.  It also takes time to revamp a program.  The kids don't have 2 or 3 years to wait for a turnaround.  They miss valuable developmental benchmarks in the process that may never be recovered.
          ----------------------------------------------------
          From:  steve&jen swanhart <sjswanhart@j...>
          Date:  Mon Jul 1, 2002  9:37 am
          Subject:  Re: [howardpubliced] Free market (was Re: parochial schools vs Howard County public schools

          Joan,
          Last time i looked factory workers were paid more than jobs at the mall
          or McDonalds which is what they have now!!
          Steve

          Joan wrote:
          > why don't we switch over to a free market
          > and have each parent pay for their own kids' education.
          > If parents can't afford it, we can
          > send their kids back to the factories, or put them
          > in for profit orphanages. After all, why should we trust
          > the government spending our money when we can
          > spent it perfectly well ourselves. It's just not
          > efficient.








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