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Re: Fw: Author talks about his dyslexia

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  • joan_pontius
    ... ??How did you arrive at this conclusion??? Or is this a book quote or something.
    Message 1 of 8 , May 3, 2002
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      --- In howardpubliced@y..., "bobrosebrough21045"
      <bobrosebrough21045@y...> wrote:
      > Some Famous Dyslexics
      > The genius of these famous dyslexics occurred because of their
      > dyslexia not in spite of it!
      >


      ??How did you arrive at this conclusion???

      Or is this a book quote or something.
    • RSYOSH@aol.com
      In a message dated 5/3/02 7:54:58 AM Pacific Daylight Time, ... There are several books on dyslexia that find this true... having a child who is dyslexic but
      Message 2 of 8 , May 5, 2002
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        In a message dated 5/3/02 7:54:58 AM Pacific Daylight Time, joan_pontius@... writes:


        The genius of these famous dyslexics occurred because of their
        > dyslexia not in spite of it!
        >


        ??How did you arrive at this conclusion???

        Or is this a book quote or something.


        There are several books on dyslexia that find this true... having a child who is dyslexic but has learned to compensate, I can tell you (thru outside evals she has had) that her dyslexia is closely associated with her phenomenal artistic talent.  

        - Becky
      • joan_pontius
        ... child who ... outside evals ... phenomenal ... I still don t get it. Being closely associated doesn t mean one caused the other.
        Message 3 of 8 , May 6, 2002
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          --- In howardpubliced@y..., RSYOSH@a... wrote:
          > In a message dated 5/3/02 7:54:58 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
          > joan_pontius@y... writes:
          >
          >
          > > The genius of these famous dyslexics occurred because of their
          > > > dyslexia not in spite of it!
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ??How did you arrive at this conclusion???
          > >
          > > Or is this a book quote or something.
          > >
          >
          > There are several books on dyslexia that find this true... having a
          child who
          > is dyslexic but has learned to compensate, I can tell you (thru
          outside evals
          > she has had) that her dyslexia is closely associated with her
          phenomenal
          > artistic talent.
          >
          > - Becky




          I still don't get it. Being closely associated doesn't
          mean one caused the other.
        • RSYOSH@aol.com
          In a message dated 5/6/02 4:45:05 AM Pacific Daylight Time, ... actually it means that there is an underlying perception/proceesing issue that causes both. OR
          Message 4 of 8 , May 6, 2002
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            In a message dated 5/6/02 4:45:05 AM Pacific Daylight Time, joan_pontius@... writes:




            I still don't get it. Being closely associated doesn't
            mean one caused the other.  



            actually it means that there is an underlying perception/proceesing issue that causes both. OR you can look at Dyslexia as BEING the processing issue... that leads to reading issues because of the way or written language is structure (this would not be the same problem in kanji, for example!) but also has advantages in other ways.

            Think of it this way...

            when you look at a chair, no matter which way you tip it, you still see a chair, right?  Now think of a die... If you see it at an angle, and you see the 6-spot, 2-spot, 3-spot, you can visualize what is on the other side right? And for my daughter, she can virtually rotate that immage in her head and still draw it on paper in accurate scale.  She doesn't need to use a grid to enlarge and image... she can enlarge something to scale AND rotate it, without additional visual aides.  She can "see it" as a whole in her head.


            Now, by contrast...

            Think of the small letter "d".  Rotate it, flip it......and it can become p,b,q.

            So she has learned to compensate by "sight-reading" the WHOLE shape of the WORD. Which leads to interesting problems.  She is more likely to accurately read a long word like "mischievous", but confuse two short words like "that" and "what".  So when it comes to trying to memorizing spelling lists we resort to visual tricks that will play on her strengths, like writing each syllable in a different color, underling the vowels, to help her visualize the smaller parts when she writes the words.  She also practices by looking at the color coded word, then closing her eyes and as she visulaizes the word in her head she spells it forwards AND backwards.

            We're tried phonetic approaches ad nauseum, which work for some dyslexic kids, but don't work for her.  The color coding works much better, altho she still (in 7th grade) can't easily "syllabicate" a word or consistently put a vowel in every syllable.  She will often use all the RIGHT letters,....but in the wrong sequence.

            We had her checked for visual tracking and her eyes track together fine.  She does tend to scan a sentence for key words, get the meaning from context.... and if the meaning is difficult she rescans.  She LOVES to read and has a great vocabulary.  Her scanning technique (it was found) really only slows when reading several years "above age"... when she may scan the same sentence 3 or 4 times.  Her spelling will alsways be an issue.... even with spell check she always needs someone else to proof read her final work.

            hope this helps....

            - Becky
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