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Re: More on Alpha Females

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  • bobrosebrough21045
    Try NOW.org always a good source of venom ... boys, ... lives. ... guile. ... a ... friend s ... a ... a ... icy ... in ... called ... the ... is ... with ...
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 5, 2002
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      Try NOW.org always a good source of venom

      -- In howardpubliced@y..., "joan_pontius" <joan_pontius@y...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > when is someone going to write a mean book
      > about the mean people who are writing mean book
      > reviews about the mean books about the mean girls
      > who are mean to people in jr. highschool.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > -- In howardpubliced@y..., "bobrosebrough21045"
      > <bobrosebrough21045@y...> wrote:
      > > Suzanne Fields
      > > Mean girls in the mean streets of middle school
      > >
      > > http://www.NewsAndOpinion.com -- MEAN girls, maybe meaner than
      boys,
      > > are in. The Feminine Mystique was a revolutionary guide book for
      > > would-be feminists about how to rebel against their mothers'
      lives.
      > > Mean girls have boomer moms. A mean girl just wants to be her own
      > > man.
      > >
      > > A mean girl doesn't need testosterone. She's got bile without
      guile.
      > > She takes no prisoners in her pursuit of popularity. She'll stab
      a
      > > girl in the back, stick pins in a doll made up in her best
      friend's
      > > image, and roar like a lioness. She's not satisfied to meow like
      a
      > > pussycat.
      > >
      > > Mean girls, as described in the New York Times, are more little
      > > witches than bitc-es, and you find them stirring the cauldron of
      > > double trouble in, of all places, middle school. These girls have
      a
      > > Darwinian drive with unlimited energy for social climbing on the
      icy
      > > path to popularity.
      > >
      > > A grown woman can be enraged by the guy who turns his back to her
      in
      > > bed, but his is a gentleman's gesture compared to the 11-year-old
      > > girl who turns her back on her closest girlfriend, giving her the
      > > silent treatment as she walks down the hall at school. Mean girls
      > > make the battle between the sexes sound like a march for peace.
      > Their
      > > wars end at Waterloo (or Hiroshima).
      > >
      > > The girls, known as Queen Bees, Alphas and RMG's (Really Mean
      > Girls),
      > > are writing the primer for succeeding socially in the mean streets
      > of
      > > middle school, and naturally "help'' is on the way. There's a new
      > > enterprise in helping a mean girl to give up her wicked, wicked
      > ways.
      > > Rosalind Wiseman, for example, runs a nonprofit organization
      called
      > > the Empower Program, with classes in 60 schools. She teaches at
      the
      > > National Cathedral School, a private school in Washington for
      > > daughters of the rich, the powerful and the political. One class
      is
      > > devoted to learning how to apologize. (A few daddies and mommies
      > > could take -- or teach -- that one.)
      > >
      > > The idea is to get the popular girls to become more aware of
      > > their "relational aggression'' and say "I'm sorry,'' even if they
      > > really aren't. (''I shouldn't have called you a fat, ugly slut
      with
      > a
      > > red splotchy complexion. You're merely plump and flirty with
      > acne.'')
      > > What we have here is the creation of just what we need, a whole
      new
      > > class of victims, the object of the popular girl's viciousness.
      > >
      > > The title of Rosalind Wiseman's forthcoming book, "Queen Bees and
      > > Wannabees: Helping Your Daughter Survive Cliques, Gossip,
      Boyfriends
      > > and Other Realities of Adolescence,'' gives you the flavor of her
      > > themes. The approach sounds like a touchy-feely movement for
      > > preadolescents, based on what their parents and grandparents
      learned
      > > and unlearned in Esalen hot tubs. Next up, no doubt, will be
      > > the "Greening of 'Tweens.''
      > >
      > > Many schools hire outside "experts'' to teach topics such as
      girls
      > > vs. girls, girls as foes, girls can be boys. We're coming full
      > > circle, teaching mean girls to give up their nails and snails and
      > > puppy-dog tails for sugar, spice and everything nice.
      > > Treating the vixen has become an industry, the latest thing
      > > in "social problems.'' "We are currently looking at relational
      > > aggression like domestic violence 20 years ago,'' says Holly
      > > Nishimura, assistant director of the Ophelia Project, which
      teaches
      > > girls to stop hurting each other. "Though it's not on the same
      > scale,
      > > we believe that with relational aggression, the trajectory of
      > > awareness, knowledge and demand for change will follow the same
      > > track.''
      > >
      > > What's this? Girl disses girlfriend equals man beats wife? Can a
      > > government program be far behind?
      > >
      > > We've just recently found out that the "self-esteem movement''
      > covers
      > > up a multitude of slothful habits parading as confidence and
      > damaging
      > > a young person's abilities to achieve, and now here's the nicey-
      nice
      > > movement to move bad behavior to a safe place behind the
      teacher's
      > > back.
      > > The New York Times juxtaposed its mean girls with a display of
      > famous
      > > femmes fatales, past and present, under the headline: "Goodness
      Has
      > > Nothing to Do With It.'' Rose McGowan of WB's "Charmed,'' is
      known
      > > for playing bad girls on and off the screen. (She dated Marilyn
      > > Manson.) "What I like about bad girls she says,'' is that they
      don't
      > > know they're bad.'' Her role models are Lana Turner in "The
      Postman
      > > Always Rings Twice,'' the woman who persuades her lover to murder
      > her
      > > husband, and Ava Gardner in "Mogambo,'' photographed with a lion
      in
      > a
      > > movie where "the bad girl gets the man!''
      > >
      > > What the mean girl learns is what women have always known, girls
      vs.
      > > girls is how women learn to fight other women to get the man. The
      > > more things change the more they stay the same. Meow.
    • joan_pontius
      ... True! Plus I can see how claims that women are mean because they want to act like men or because they want to get a man into bed would ruffle their furr.
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 6, 2002
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        --- In howardpubliced@y..., "bobrosebrough21045"
        <bobrosebrough21045@y...> wrote:
        > Try NOW.org always a good source of venom
        >

        True! Plus I can see how claims that women are
        mean because they want to act like men or because
        they want to get a man into bed would ruffle their furr.
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