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Power Supply

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  • larry mendoza
    Can anyone provide me an AC to AC power supply circuit, Input 220Vac and 110Vac output not using transformer. Rgds, Larry __________________________________ Do
    Message 1 of 6 , May 2, 2003
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      Can anyone provide me an AC to AC power supply
      circuit, Input 220Vac and 110Vac output not using
      transformer.

      Rgds,
      Larry



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    • Chris AKA Junkman
      Well, you could use a light bulb, if you can find one of the right rating. (Wattage/voltage) This is a really cheap dropping resistor. Won t alter the waveform
      Message 2 of 6 , May 4, 2003
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        Well, you could use a light bulb, if you can find one of the right
        rating. (Wattage/voltage) This is a really cheap dropping resistor.
        Won't alter the waveform of the ac... Crude as heck, I know. Also,
        simple, easy, cheap. And really wasteful of power, and limited to how
        much power you can pull through it. Without knowing your
        requirements, it's hard to say what would work best. There are
        semiconductor based way to do this. More efficent, costly,
        complicated to build. Regular voltage regulators for this aren't
        really an option, I'm afraid... Not at these voltage levels, and AC
        too. You could use some sort of triac based circut. Use the incoming
        waveform to trigger it so that the output is the same waveform and
        frequency. I would think you could find a circut for this in most
        good hobbist circut 'cookbooks'. Unfortunately, I lost all my books
        to a water leak. So I can't just look one up for you. I'll bet
        someone else on the list can, however.
        Short of those two ideas, I'm out of ideas at the moment. Can you
        provide more details? Like, why the need for no transformer? (Weight,
        cost, size, availablity, Etc?)
        Would a 'chopper' work? That is, use diodes to convert AC to DC,
        then 'regulate' the DC down, and use a 'chopper' to approximate AC?
        Or does the waveform have to be a true sine wave? What is the use for
        which this circut is needed? More details would help in getting an
        answer.
        Best of luck to you.
        Junkman

        --- In home_electronics@yahoogroups.com, larry mendoza
        <larmendoza@y...> wrote:
        > Can anyone provide me an AC to AC power supply
        > circuit, Input 220Vac and 110Vac output not using
        > transformer.
        >
        > Rgds,
        > Larry
        >
        >
        >
        > __________________________________
        > Do you Yahoo!?
        > The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.
        > http://search.yahoo.com
      • larry mendoza
        I want to have a power supply not using transformer input 220Vac output 110Vac, I use this to an TV,VHS, VCD and DVD player which only have 110Vac input,
        Message 3 of 6 , May 8, 2003
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          I want to have a power supply not using transformer
          input 220Vac output 110Vac, I use this to an TV,VHS,
          VCD and DVD player which only have 110Vac input,
          unlike
          in my country standard using 220Vac.
          Hope someone can provide me this power supply.

          Regards,
          Larry M.



          --- Chris AKA Junkman <therealjunkman@...>
          wrote:
          > Well, you could use a light bulb, if you can find
          > one of the right
          > rating. (Wattage/voltage) This is a really cheap
          > dropping resistor.
          > Won't alter the waveform of the ac... Crude as heck,
          > I know. Also,
          > simple, easy, cheap. And really wasteful of power,
          > and limited to how
          > much power you can pull through it. Without knowing
          > your
          > requirements, it's hard to say what would work best.
          > There are
          > semiconductor based way to do this. More efficent,
          > costly,
          > complicated to build. Regular voltage regulators for
          > this aren't
          > really an option, I'm afraid... Not at these voltage
          > levels, and AC
          > too. You could use some sort of triac based circut.
          > Use the incoming
          > waveform to trigger it so that the output is the
          > same waveform and
          > frequency. I would think you could find a circut for
          > this in most
          > good hobbist circut 'cookbooks'. Unfortunately, I
          > lost all my books
          > to a water leak. So I can't just look one up for
          > you. I'll bet
          > someone else on the list can, however.
          > Short of those two ideas, I'm out of ideas at the
          > moment. Can you
          > provide more details? Like, why the need for no
          > transformer? (Weight,
          > cost, size, availablity, Etc?)
          > Would a 'chopper' work? That is, use diodes to
          > convert AC to DC,
          > then 'regulate' the DC down, and use a 'chopper' to
          > approximate AC?
          > Or does the waveform have to be a true sine wave?
          > What is the use for
          > which this circut is needed? More details would help
          > in getting an
          > answer.
          > Best of luck to you.
          > Junkman
          >
          > --- In home_electronics@yahoogroups.com, larry
          > mendoza
          > <larmendoza@y...> wrote:
          > > Can anyone provide me an AC to AC power supply
          > > circuit, Input 220Vac and 110Vac output not using
          > > transformer.
          > >
          > > Rgds,
          > > Larry
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > __________________________________
          > > Do you Yahoo!?
          > > The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.
          > > http://search.yahoo.com
          >
          >


          __________________________________
          Do you Yahoo!?
          The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.
          http://search.yahoo.com
        • Jack Emery
          Suggestion use for safety isolation transformers...6 or 12v stepdown transformers at amps needed...one pir 220v, second pri 120v.. Works well cheap and
          Message 4 of 6 , May 8, 2003
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            Suggestion use for safety isolation transformers...6 or 12v stepdown transformers  at amps needed...one pir 220v, second pri 120v.. Works well cheap and safe..Just a Jack http://www.avrelectronics.com
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, May 08, 2003 7:52 PM
            Subject: Re: [Electronica] Re: Power Supply

              I want to have a power supply not using transformer
            input 220Vac output 110Vac, I use this to an TV,VHS,
            VCD and DVD player which only have 110Vac input,
            unlike
            in my country standard using 220Vac.
               Hope someone can provide me this power supply.

            Regards,
            Larry M.



            --- Chris AKA Junkman <therealjunkman@...>
            wrote:
            > Well, you could use a light bulb, if you can find
            > one of the right
            > rating. (Wattage/voltage) This is a really cheap
            > dropping resistor.
            > Won't alter the waveform of the ac... Crude as heck,
            > I know. Also,
            > simple, easy, cheap. And really wasteful of power,
            > and limited to how
            > much power you can pull through it. Without knowing
            > your
            > requirements, it's hard to say what would work best.
            > There are
            > semiconductor based way to do this. More efficent,
            > costly,
            > complicated to build. Regular voltage regulators for
            > this aren't
            > really an option, I'm afraid... Not at these voltage
            > levels, and AC
            > too. You could use some sort of triac based circut.
            > Use the incoming
            > waveform to trigger it so that the output is the
            > same waveform and
            > frequency. I would think you could find a circut for
            > this in most
            > good hobbist circut 'cookbooks'. Unfortunately, I
            > lost all my books
            > to a water leak. So I can't just look one up for
            > you. I'll bet
            > someone else on the list can, however.
            > Short of those two ideas, I'm out of ideas at the
            > moment. Can you
            > provide more details? Like, why the need for no
            > transformer? (Weight,
            > cost, size, availablity, Etc?)
            > Would a 'chopper' work? That is, use diodes to
            > convert AC to DC,
            > then 'regulate' the DC down, and use a 'chopper' to
            > approximate AC?
            > Or does the waveform have to be a true sine wave?
            > What is the use for
            > which this circut is needed? More details would help
            > in getting an
            > answer.
            > Best of luck to you.
            > Junkman
            >
            > --- In home_electronics@yahoogroups.com, larry
            > mendoza
            > <larmendoza@y...> wrote:
            > > Can anyone provide me an AC to AC power supply
            > > circuit, Input 220Vac and 110Vac output not using
            > > transformer.
            > >
            > > Rgds,
            > > Larry
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > __________________________________
            > > Do you Yahoo!?
            > > The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.
            > > http://search.yahoo.com
            >
            >


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            Do you Yahoo!?
            The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.
            http://search.yahoo.com


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          • Chris AKA Junkman
            Just a Jack is 100% right, of course. If there is ANY possibility of coming into contact with any part of such a circut as I mentioned, you could be very
            Message 5 of 6 , May 8, 2003
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              Just a Jack is 100% right, of course. If there is ANY possibility of
              coming into contact with any part of such a circut as I mentioned,
              you could be very seriously killed. The light bulb trick is an OLD
              one... Not a very SAFE one. I only mentioned it because the orginal
              poster asked specifically about NOT having to use transformers. (I
              never did learn the reason why transformers were out of the question
              for him)
              I do not wish to see anyone get hurt, and advocate using all
              precautions at all times. Even though I personaly have been known to
              violate this, that was my choice. I knew better when I did so. I
              would hate to have anyone get hurt on use of my advice or discussion
              because I failed to mention safety. I am NOT a trained teacher, and
              never claimed to be one, just a tinkerer. I make a bad habit
              sometimes of assuming that someone who has enough knowlege to ask a
              certian sort of question must have some knowlege of same... A wrong
              and dangerous assumption, I know. I appologise to all. Although I
              attempt to be through and as complete as possible when I post, I can
              not possibly know everyone's skill levels or safety training. (If
              any) I can forget, as in this case, to mention some safety measure.
              When in doubt, ASK FIRST! Or just don't do it. And always keep one
              hand in your pocket when around any high voltages. (No, that's NOT a
              joke)
              The transformer to transformer setup Just a Jack mentioned is always
              a good idea, and a lot cheaper than a 'real' isolation transformer.
              Every test bench should be set up with isolation, even if it will not
              be needed in the final product. It's a lot cheaper than a funeral.

              Again, my appologies to all, and my thanks to Just a Jack for
              catching my lapse of memory. (In my defense, I do have MS, and some
              memory problems as a result. That's no excuse, just an explaination.)
              Sincerely:
              Chris Mills
              aka Junkman

              --- In home_electronics@yahoogroups.com, Jack Emery <jackemery@c...>
              wrote:
              > Suggestion use for safety isolation transformers...6 or 12v
              stepdown transformers at amps needed...one pir 220v, second pri
              120v.. Works well cheap and safe..Just a Jack
              http://www.avrelectronics.com
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: larry mendoza
              > To: home_electronics@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Thursday, May 08, 2003 7:52 PM
              > Subject: Re: [Electronica] Re: Power Supply
              >
              >
              > I want to have a power supply not using transformer
              > input 220Vac output 110Vac, I use this to an TV,VHS,
              > VCD and DVD player which only have 110Vac input,
              > unlike
              > in my country standard using 220Vac.
              > Hope someone can provide me this power supply.
              >
              > Regards,
              > Larry M.
              >
              >
              >
              > --- Chris AKA Junkman <therealjunkman@y...>
              > wrote:
              > > Well, you could use a light bulb, if you can find
              > > one of the right
              > > rating. (Wattage/voltage) This is a really cheap
              > > dropping resistor.
              > > Won't alter the waveform of the ac... Crude as heck,
              > > I know. Also,
              > > simple, easy, cheap. And really wasteful of power,
              > > and limited to how
              > > much power you can pull through it. Without knowing
              > > your
              > > requirements, it's hard to say what would work best.
              > > There are
              > > semiconductor based way to do this. More efficent,
              > > costly,
              > > complicated to build. Regular voltage regulators for
              > > this aren't
              > > really an option, I'm afraid... Not at these voltage
              > > levels, and AC
              > > too. You could use some sort of triac based circut.
              > > Use the incoming
              > > waveform to trigger it so that the output is the
              > > same waveform and
              > > frequency. I would think you could find a circut for
              > > this in most
              > > good hobbist circut 'cookbooks'. Unfortunately, I
              > > lost all my books
              > > to a water leak. So I can't just look one up for
              > > you. I'll bet
              > > someone else on the list can, however.
              > > Short of those two ideas, I'm out of ideas at the
              > > moment. Can you
              > > provide more details? Like, why the need for no
              > > transformer? (Weight,
              > > cost, size, availablity, Etc?)
              > > Would a 'chopper' work? That is, use diodes to
              > > convert AC to DC,
              > > then 'regulate' the DC down, and use a 'chopper' to
              > > approximate AC?
              > > Or does the waveform have to be a true sine wave?
              > > What is the use for
              > > which this circut is needed? More details would help
              > > in getting an
              > > answer.
              > > Best of luck to you.
              > > Junkman
              > >
              > > --- In home_electronics@yahoogroups.com, larry
              > > mendoza
              > > <larmendoza@y...> wrote:
              > > > Can anyone provide me an AC to AC power supply
              > > > circuit, Input 220Vac and 110Vac output not using
              > > > transformer.
              > > >
              > > > Rgds,
              > > > Larry
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > __________________________________
              > > > Do you Yahoo!?
              > > > The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.
              > > > http://search.yahoo.com
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > __________________________________
              > Do you Yahoo!?
              > The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.
              > http://search.yahoo.com
              >
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              >
              >
              >
              > Translation, Web Design, Marketing & Advertising: MultiMedia Ltd,
              http://www.teleactivities.com
              >
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              >
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