Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [Electronica] Polarized Plug on Non Polarized Lamp

Expand Messages
  • Roy J. Tellason
    ... What, trimming a plug? ... It s not been apparent to me for quite some time now what that reason might be. First time I ever ran across those was in
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 13, 2005
      On Wednesday 12 January 2005 08:41 am, David Balma wrote:
      > I would not do what you are describing.

      What, trimming a plug?

      > They made polarized plugs for a reason.

      It's not been apparent to me for quite some time now what that reason might
      be. First time I ever ran across those was in certain "hot chassis" models
      of TV, but that was a LONG time ago. For a lamp or a fan or somesuch, it
      makes no sense at all.

      > It was to keep the "hot" side of the AC circuit identified so it could be
      > kept off the chassis eliminating an electrocution hazard.

      Since there's no guarantee that any given electrical outlet is going to be
      wired properly the only thing that makes sense to me in this context is to
      keep *BOTH* sides of the line "off the chassis". Been doing that for oh,
      four decades or so more or less.

      > In your case of an AC lamp I would take the hot side of the AC and connect
      > it to the center conductor of the lamp socket. Thus in this manner the least
      > amount of conductor would be exposed and possibly come in contact with
      > ground potential(big spark) or even worse a human being in series to
      > ground(possible death).

      A properly done lamp connection won't have any metal that's connected
      available to be touched by person or object...

      > To take this concept one more step in the proper direction investigate how
      > a GFI works and why they use these devices today in modern housing.

      I know how they work, basically looking for a difference in the current in
      the hot and neutral wires. And why they're used.

      > Its to avoid death. They accomplish this by cutting off AC power on the
      > outlet when only a few micro amps(or even less, nano) are detected flowing
      > to ground. The sensing only takes a fraction of a second into the AC sine
      > wave cycle to trip the breaker.

      I don't think the response is *quite* that fast.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.