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PWM selection; how does PIC do so many functions?

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  • jownzie
    Okay guys, thanks for your help on PWM verse ADC. I surely see PWM is the better choice. One particular aspect I liked is the impulse the motor will feel
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 27 3:09 PM
      Okay guys, thanks for your help on PWM verse ADC. I surely see PWM is
      the better choice. One particular aspect I liked is the impulse the
      motor will "feel" every period. I like this... anyway, I have another
      question.
      I am looking to buy a microcontroller with an internal PWM on
      board. One that will just output a PWM signal on its own instead of
      you programming the interrupts and stuff. My guess is you simple write
      an 8 or 10 bit number to a register and the PWM adjusts automatically.
      Anyways, I am finding it difficult to locate just what I want. I am
      looking at PIC microcontrollers and in one instance it will say this
      particular chip has 4 PWM and then in another it says only one, and
      then finally there is another that says none. I am thinking of using
      the PIC becuase they are so cheap. Like 5 bucks for a microprocessor
      that has quite a few functions. So my first question is this: Any way
      for me to determine absolutely how many of these PWM are on the chip.
      The information really seems to be quite vague. Maybe someone can
      recommend one.
      I also had seen a few microcontrollers from PIC that had like
      only 8 pins. 2 are for input power leaving only 6 pins. I know the
      chip has a ton of functions that would use more than 6, like mutliple
      output, not too mention some interrupts and other stuff. I can see the
      pins having multiple functions but I can't see having a dedicated
      output being used as another function. Do they expext the user to
      attach some sort of multiplexer? Or is all the microprocessor data
      serially output and you have to sort through the serial data to update
      pins and what not? Or do you have really limited choices where once
      you select a particular pin to say be a dedicated input, it is that
      and cannot be used as the other functions designated for that pin,
      unless of course you rewrite the control data for that pin.
      Okay, thanks and sorry about the lengthy post.
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