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Holy Rule for Mar. 12

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers for Manuel Cely Silva, being ordained today, and for his friend, Peg, who will be braving the second reading in Spanish. Deo gratias and prayers
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 12, 2005
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      +PAX

      Prayers for Manuel Cely Silva, being ordained today, and for his friend, Peg, who will be braving the second reading in Spanish. Deo gratias and prayers of thanksgiving for Lois, for whom we prayed. There is no sign of cancer in her lungs. Prayers, too, for the well-being of Kendall, for her grandparents and all her family. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much! JL

      March 12, July 12, November 11
      Chapter 34: Whether All Should Receive in Equal Measure What Is
      Necessary

      Let us follow the Scripture,
      "Distribution was made to each
      according as anyone had need" (Acts 4:35).
      By this we do not mean that there should be respecting of persons
      (which God forbid),
      but consideration for infirmities.
      She who needs less should thank God and not be discontented;
      but she who needs more
      should be humbled by the thought of her infirmity
      rather than feeling important
      on account of the kindness shown her.
      Thus all the members will be at peace.

      Above all, let not the evil of murmuring appear
      for any reason whatsoever
      in the least word or sign.
      If anyone is caught at it,
      let her be placed under very severe discipline.

      REFLECTION

      Look, I am almost always running repeats now, usually from over a year
      ago. I have gone through the Holy Rule three or more times and there are only so
      many hours in a day... However, this is a repeat without shame!
      My heart keeps going back to this one I wrote in March, three years ago,
      largely because it was one huge love-song to my brothers and a litany
      of my own infirmities, which they so lovingly ignore.

      However, I did not get up the nerve to tell all my lists one very
      important piece of information when it first appeared. Some of you
      have joined after that, so now you'll get the whole picture. I think
      you will agree that it says even more wonderful things about my
      communities here, monks and nuns, that they would take me.

      The important difference unmentioned before was that I was diagnosed
      as HIV+ two years before I became a diocesan hermit, and six years
      before I arrived here. When the post is read with that knowledge, you
      can really see how great my community is!

      And, by the way, for those just finding out, my health is superb! I
      thought I'd be long dead by now, but I'm not even sick yet. On meds and
      doing fine!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB



      REFLECTION

      I came here nearly six years ago as a professed diocesan hermit who
      was an Oblate. From the beginning, I have lived in the guesthouse,
      because caring for the guesthouse was the mutual arrangement under
      which I moved here from Boston. From day one that meant all kinds of
      exceptions with permission for me. My life in a Boston rectory had
      been very different from my brothers' lives here. My superior told me
      to pretty much bring the life I had with me and make adjustments as
      necessary after I arrived.

      Well, it's astounding at how few adjustments got made... at least by
      me. It was my brothers who accepted the exceptions. The grace and
      charity with which they did so was- and continues to be- an
      outstanding example of how this chapter can be lived. Not only did
      they not murmur (I quite expected that they might,) they simply loved
      me, took me for the stray and loser and roaring exception that I am
      without further ado. It humbled me then and it humbles me still. I
      stand in awe of my brothers, every single one of whom is younger (in
      age, not profession,) than me. They are vastly better monks. I
      probably couldn't live their life exactly for more than 20 minutes or
      so. That does not matter to them. I do. Wow!

      That can really make one deeply grateful and yes, my infirmities do
      humble me and no, I don't feel important because of the kindness they
      show me. I feel only gratuitous love, richly undeserved. That, my
      friends is what we get from God, and that is what all our communities
      should be giving to the weak ones in our midst. In home, work, school
      or cloister we should all be giving the strugglers what I have
      received here.

      Our Congregation requires a legal contract between Community and
      Oblate for claustral oblation. Hence, when I transferred everything
      here and dropped the diocesan connection, the Chapter formally
      approved my embarrassing life of exceptions. I used to think that the
      exceptions were all that could be seen, but I know that's not true.
      My brothers see Jerome, that's all. Nothing more, nothing less. By
      their loving deeds they freely accord me a fullness and equality of
      membership that I would never dream of demanding, and they do so
      repeatedly. It is they who remind me that I belong here, not the
      other way around! They never remind me in a patronizing way, either.
      It's more like: "DUH?! You're one of us, you know!" And I am, I
      really am, but only by God's grace and that of my brothers, nothing
      at all of me.

      How I wish all of you could get to know my Community. If you saw them
      in action (and me in INaction!) it would preach a far more eloquent
      sermon on this chapter than anything I could ever write. By the way,
      I surely am accepted by my sisters here, too, but I chose to write
      today of the closer ties I have with my own community of brothers.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Steve, whose father was found dead, possibly a suicide, and for all his family. A very trying time for them all. Prayers for Sr. Lany
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 12, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Steve, whose father was found dead, possibly a suicide, and for all his family. A very trying time for them all. Prayers for Sr. Lany Jo, whose Dad still hovers near death, for his happy death and all his family. Prayers for Joseph, deployed in Afghanistan, for his wife, Maureen and daughter Cecilia. Prayers for Rebecca, her husband Sharbel and son, Tabor, may the Lord continue to bless this family. Prayers for Bishop David, cancer spreading to his brain and nervous system. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        March 12, July 12, November 11
        Chapter 34: Whether All Should Receive in Equal Measure What Is
        Necessary

        Let us follow the Scripture,
        "Distribution was made to each
        according as anyone had need" (Acts 4:35).
        By this we do not mean that there should be respecting of persons
        (which God forbid),
        but consideration for infirmities.
        She who needs less should thank God and not be discontented;
        but she who needs more
        should be humbled by the thought of her infirmity
        rather than feeling important
        on account of the kindness shown her.
        Thus all the members will be at peace.

        Above all, let not the evil of murmuring appear
        for any reason whatsoever
        in the least word or sign.
        If anyone is caught at it,
        let her be placed under very severe discipline.

        REFLECTION

        Look, I am almost always running repeats now, usually from over a year
        ago. I have gone through the Holy Rule three or more times and there are only so
        many hours in a day... However, this is a repeat without shame!
        My heart keeps going back to this one I wrote in March, three years ago,
        largely because it was one huge love-song to my brothers and a litany
        of my own infirmities, which they so lovingly ignore.

        However, I did not get up the nerve to tell all my lists one very
        important piece of information when it first appeared. Some of you
        have joined after that, so now you'll get the whole picture. I think
        you will agree that it says even more wonderful things about my
        communities here, monks and nuns, that they would take me.

        The important difference unmentioned before was that I was diagnosed
        as HIV+ two years before I became a diocesan hermit, and six years
        before I arrived here. When the post is read with that knowledge, you
        can really see how great my community is!

        And, by the way, for those just finding out, my health is superb! I
        thought I'd be long dead by now, but I'm not even sick yet. On meds and
        doing fine!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB



        REFLECTION

        I came here in June of 1996 as a professed diocesan hermit who
        was an Oblate. From the beginning, I have lived in the guesthouse,
        because caring for the guesthouse was the mutual arrangement under
        which I moved here from Boston. From day one that meant all kinds of
        exceptions with permission for me. My life in a Boston rectory had
        been very different from my brothers' lives here. My superior told me
        to pretty much bring the life I had with me and make adjustments as
        necessary after I arrived.

        Well, it's astounding at how few adjustments got made... at least by
        me. It was my brothers who accepted the exceptions. The grace and
        charity with which they did so was- and continues to be- an
        outstanding example of how this chapter can be lived. Not only did
        they not murmur (I quite expected that they might,) they simply loved
        me, took me for the stray and loser and roaring exception that I am
        without further ado. It humbled me then and it humbles me still. I
        stand in awe of my brothers, every single one of whom is younger (in
        age, not profession,) than me. They are vastly better monks. I
        probably couldn't live their life exactly for more than 20 minutes or
        so. That does not matter to them. I do. Wow!

        That can really make one deeply grateful and yes, my infirmities do
        humble me and no, I don't feel important because of the kindness they
        show me. I feel only gratuitous love, richly undeserved. That, my
        friends is what we get from God, and that is what all our communities
        should be giving to the weak ones in our midst. In home, work, school
        or cloister we should all be giving the strugglers what I have
        received here.

        Our Congregation requires a legal contract between Community and
        Oblate for claustral oblation. Hence, when I transferred everything
        here and dropped the diocesan connection, the Chapter formally
        approved my embarrassing life of exceptions. I used to think that the
        exceptions were all that could be seen, but I know that's not true.

        My brothers see Jerome, that's all. Nothing more, nothing less. By
        their loving deeds they freely accord me a fullness and equality of
        membership that I would never dream of demanding, and they do so
        repeatedly. It is they who remind me that I belong here, not the
        other way around! They never remind me in a patronizing way, either.
        It's more like: "DUH?! You're one of us, you know!" And I am, I
        really am, but only by God's grace and that of my brothers, nothing
        at all of me.

        How I wish all of you could get to know my Community. If you saw them
        in action (and me in INaction!) it would preach a far more eloquent
        sermon on this chapter than anything I could ever write. By the way,
        I surely am accepted by my sisters here, too, but I chose to write
        today of the closer ties I have with my own community of brothers.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX Thanks for all your prayers and Deo gratias! The retreat went wonderfully well and I am so grateful to all who prayed. It meant so much to the retreatants
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 11, 2007
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          +PAX

          Thanks for all your prayers and Deo gratias! The retreat went wonderfully
          well and I am so grateful to all who prayed. It meant so much to the retreatants
          to know that folks literally all over the world were praying for them and it
          meant the world to me, too!

          Prayers, please, for Brea Grace, 21 months old. Her parents adopted her from
          China 4 1/2 months ago. She was born with a hole in her heart, she
          contracted a virus and her heart is now enlarged. She is on the list for a transplant,
          but her Mom is praying for healing of her heart. She has gone into cardiac
          arrest 3 times and is now being treated out of state, so her Mom is living
          either at her bedside or in the waiting room at the hospital. Prayers for a
          company bought out and down-sized, and for Ann, forced into a managerial position
          with little experience and now dealing with the chaotic feelings of the
          employees left in her department.

          Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Mattie, for whom we have
          prayed in the past, who died of cancer yesterday, prayers, too, for all her
          family and all who mourn her. Prayers for Anne and John, being commissioned as
          Eucharistic Ministers, and for the success of their apostolate of bringing
          Communion to those who cannot get to Church. Prayers, too, for John, as he has a
          very important meeting with the Board of Governors of his school. Lord, help
          us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God
          is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          March 12, July 12, November 11
          Chapter 34: Whether All Should Receive in Equal Measure What Is
          Necessary

          Let us follow the Scripture,
          "Distribution was made to each
          according as anyone had need" (Acts 4:35).
          By this we do not mean that there should be respecting of persons
          (which God forbid),
          but consideration for infirmities.
          She who needs less should thank God and not be discontented;
          but she who needs more
          should be humbled by the thought of her infirmity
          rather than feeling important
          on account of the kindness shown her.
          Thus all the members will be at peace.

          Above all, let not the evil of murmuring appear
          for any reason whatsoever
          in the least word or sign.
          If anyone is caught at it,
          let her be placed under very severe discipline.

          REFLECTION

          Look, I am almost always running repeats now, usually from over a year
          ago. I have gone through the Holy Rule three or more times and there are
          only so
          many hours in a day... However, this is a repeat without shame!
          My heart keeps going back to this one I wrote in March, four or five years
          ago,
          largely because it was one huge love-song to my brothers and a litany
          of my own infirmities, which they so lovingly ignore.

          However, I did not get up the nerve to tell all my lists one very
          important piece of information when it first appeared. Some of you
          have joined after that, so now you'll get the whole picture. I think
          you will agree that it says even more wonderful things about my
          communities here, monks and nuns, that they would take me.

          The important difference unmentioned before was that I was diagnosed
          as HIV+ two years before I became a diocesan hermit, and six years
          before I arrived here. When the post is read with that knowledge, you
          can really see how great my community is!

          And, by the way, for those just finding out, my health is superb! I
          thought I'd be long dead by now, but I'm not even sick yet. On meds and
          doing fine!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB



          REFLECTION

          I came here in June of 1996 as a professed diocesan hermit who
          was an Oblate. From the beginning, I have lived in the guesthouse,
          because caring for the guesthouse was the mutual arrangement under
          which I moved here from Boston. From day one that meant all kinds of
          exceptions with permission for me. My life in a Boston rectory had
          been very different from my brothers' lives here. My superior told me
          to pretty much bring the life I had with me and make adjustments as
          necessary after I arrived.

          Well, it's astounding at how few adjustments got made... at least by
          me. It was my brothers who accepted the exceptions. The grace and
          charity with which they did so was- and continues to be- an
          outstanding example of how this chapter can be lived. Not only did
          they not murmur (I quite expected that they might,) they simply loved
          me, took me for the stray and loser and roaring exception that I am
          without further ado. It humbled me then and it humbles me still. I
          stand in awe of my brothers, every single one of whom is younger (in
          age, not profession,) than me. They are vastly better monks. I
          probably couldn't live their life exactly for more than 20 minutes or
          so. That does not matter to them. I do. Wow!

          That can really make one deeply grateful and yes, my infirmities do
          humble me and no, I don't feel important because of the kindness they
          show me. I feel only gratuitous love, richly undeserved. That, my
          friends is what we get from God, and that is what all our communities
          should be giving to the weak ones in our midst. In home, work, school
          or cloister we should all be giving the strugglers what I have
          received here.

          Our Congregation requires a legal contract between Community and
          Oblate for claustral oblation. Hence, when I transferred everything
          here and dropped the diocesan connection, the Chapter formally
          approved my embarrassing life of exceptions. I used to think that the
          exceptions were all that could be seen, but I know that's not true.

          My brothers see Jerome, that's all. Nothing more, nothing less. By
          their loving deeds they freely accord me a fullness and equality of
          membership that I would never dream of demanding, and they do so
          repeatedly. It is they who remind me that I belong here, not the
          other way around! They never remind me in a patronizing way, either.
          It's more like: "DUH?! You're one of us, you know!" And I am, I
          really am, but only by God's grace and that of my brothers, nothing
          at all of me.

          How I wish all of you could get to know my Community. If you saw them
          in action (and me in INaction!) it would preach a far more eloquent
          sermon on this chapter than anything I could ever write. By the way,
          I surely am accepted by my sisters here, too, but I chose to write
          today of the closer ties I have with my own community of brothers.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
          Petersham, MA

          <BR><BR><BR>**************************************<BR> AOL now offers free
          email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at
          http://www.aol.com.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Br. Vincent s Dad, Cos, who died at about 10:30 Monday night, for his wife, Vita, his children
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 11, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Br. Vincent's Dad, Cos, who died at about 10:30 Monday night, for his wife, Vita, his children Steve, Karen, Dave and Br. Vincent, his grandchildren and all their family.

            Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of Terry... she just passed away from bone cancer, and her husband who recently died from a heart attack.

            Prayers, too, for the spiritual, mental and physical well-being of the following, for all their families and all who take care of them:

            Roger, on his birthday.

            Jeannie, recently diagnosed with cancer. Going this week to begin treatment.

            Ken, a diaconate candidate who is suffering the physical effects of a stress-filled life, including debilitating stomach pain and hospitalization.

            Lord, help
            us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God
            is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            March 12, July 12, November 11
            Chapter 34: Whether All Should Receive in Equal Measure What Is
            Necessary

            Let us follow the Scripture,
            "Distribution was made to each
            according as anyone had need" (Acts 4:35).
            By this we do not mean that there should be respecting of persons
            (which God forbid),
            but consideration for infirmities.
            She who needs less should thank God and not be discontented;
            but she who needs more
            should be humbled by the thought of her infirmity
            rather than feeling important
            on account of the kindness shown her.
            Thus all the members will be at peace.

            Above all, let not the evil of murmuring appear
            for any reason whatsoever
            in the least word or sign.
            If anyone is caught at it,
            let her be placed under very severe discipline.

            REFLECTION

            Look, I am almost always running repeats now, usually from over a year
            ago. I have gone through the Holy Rule three or more times and there are
            only so
            many hours in a day... However, this is a repeat without shame!
            My heart keeps going back to this one I wrote in March, four or five years
            ago,
            largely because it was one huge love-song to my brothers and a litany
            of my own infirmities, which they so lovingly ignore.

            However, I did not get up the nerve to tell all my lists one very
            important piece of information when it first appeared. Some of you
            have joined after that, so now you'll get the whole picture. I think
            you will agree that it says even more wonderful things about my
            communities here, monks and nuns, that they would take me.

            The important difference unmentioned before was that I was diagnosed
            as HIV+ two years before I became a diocesan hermit monk, and six years
            before I arrived here. When the post is read with that knowledge, you
            can really see how great my community is!

            And, by the way, for those just finding out, my health is superb! I
            thought I'd be long dead by now, but I'm not even sick yet. On meds and
            doing fine!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB



            REFLECTION

            I came here in June of 1996 as a professed diocesan hermit who
            was an Oblate. From the beginning, I have lived in the guesthouse,
            because caring for the guesthouse was the mutual arrangement under
            which I moved here from Boston. From day one that meant all kinds of
            exceptions with permission for me. My life in a Boston rectory had
            been very different from my brothers' lives here. My superior told me
            to pretty much bring the life I had with me and make adjustments as
            necessary after I arrived.

            Well, it's astounding at how few adjustments got made... at least by
            me. It was my brothers who accepted the exceptions. The grace and
            charity with which they did so was- and continues to be- an
            outstanding example of how this chapter can be lived. Not only did
            they not murmur (I quite expected that they might,) they simply loved
            me, took me for the stray and loser and roaring exception that I am
            without further ado. It humbled me then and it humbles me still. I
            stand in awe of my brothers, every single one of whom is younger (in
            age, not profession,) than me. They are vastly better monks. I
            probably couldn't live their life exactly for more than 20 minutes or
            so. That does not matter to them. I do. Wow!

            That can really make one deeply grateful and yes, my infirmities do
            humble me and no, I don't feel important because of the kindness they
            show me. I feel only gratuitous love, richly undeserved. That, my
            friends is what we get from God, and that is what all our communities
            should be giving to the weak ones in our midst. In home, work, school
            or cloister we should all be giving the strugglers what I have
            received here.

            Our Congregation requires a legal contract between Community and
            Oblate for claustral oblation. Hence, when I transferred everything
            here and dropped the diocesan connection, the Chapter formally
            approved my embarrassing life of exceptions. I used to think that the
            exceptions were all that could be seen, but I know that's not true.

            My brothers see Jerome, that's all. Nothing more, nothing less. By
            their loving deeds they freely accord me a fullness and equality of
            membership that I would never dream of demanding, and they do so
            repeatedly. It is they who remind me that I belong here, not the
            other way around! They never remind me in a patronizing way, either.
            It's more like: "DUH?! You're one of us, you know!" And I am, I
            really am, but only by God's grace and that of my brothers, nothing
            at all of me.

            How I wish all of you could get to know my Community. If you saw them
            in action (and me in INaction!) it would preach a far more eloquent
            sermon on this chapter than anything I could ever write. By the way,
            I surely am accepted by my sisters here, too, but I chose to write
            today of the closer ties I have with my own community of brothers.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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