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Holy Rule for Feb. 26

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please for Nanette, that she find the right job that God wants for her. Also continued prayers for J. and her depression, and for Ben, 37, still
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 26, 2005
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      +PAX

      Prayers, please for Nanette, that she find the right job that God wants for her. Also continued prayers for J. and her depression, and
      for Ben, 37, still hovering near death from cancer and for his wife, children and family. I also ask prayers ongoing for Lillibet, the monastery hen. Her progress is slower now, but she is doing well. Help them, Lord, as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much! JL

      February 26, June 27, October 27
      Chapter 20: On Reverence in Prayer

      When we wish to suggest our wants to persons of high station,
      we do not presume to do so
      except with humility and reverence.
      How much the more, then,
      are complete humility and pure devotion necessary
      in supplication of the Lord who is God of the universe!
      And let us be assured
      that it is not in saying a great deal that we shall be heard (Matt
      6:7),
      but in purity of heart and in tears of compunction.
      Our prayer, therefore, ought to be short and pure,
      unless it happens to be prolonged
      by an inspiration of divine grace.
      In community, however, let prayer be very short,
      and when the Superior gives the signal let all rise together.

      REFLECTION

      There is a necessary tension in Benedictine prayer, both public and
      private, between the awesome majesty and otherness of God and His
      infinite closeness and approachability. God is among us. He is not
      the guy next door, but neither is He some untouchable, easily
      offended emperor or sultan. Both these truths must be addressed in
      order to maintain a correct balance.

      God doesn't need ceremony, He doesn't need anything. All the high
      church in the world might (or might not...) tickle His fancy, but it
      does not one whit for Him personally. The rub here is that WE need
      what we offer to God, and that has been all too often forgotten in
      the last 40 years or so. In a very real and subtle sense, we BECOME
      what we offer to God, often quite unnoticed by ourselves.

      The upshot of all this is clear: offer God the lowest possible common
      denominator and that is what those offering will become; offer Him
      empty and presumptuous high church and be not surprised when those
      offering such things become rather pathetically silly themselves. In
      fact, sad fact, either extreme will make people pathetically silly
      and spiritually impoverished besides.

      Balance, always balance! The Holy Rule says "our prayer should short
      and pure." Fine, but the last part of that phrase has often gotten
      lost in the struggles of reform. Just plain short doesn't get it. God
      doesn't care about short, except insofar as it cheats us, those He
      loves.

      The balance of short AND pure will feed a normal soul well.
      Hence, if you find liturgy in any given place leaves you at least
      hungry and maybe starving, it's a safe guess that something might be
      wrong. God is still served, but His people often are not. That should
      upset both God and us.

      A very Benedictine warning here that the Carmelites would strongly
      approve: prayer is only to be prolonged by "inspiration of divine
      grace." When God does let us feel something wonderful in prayer, a
      very understandable temptation is to hang onto the feeling, to
      prolong it, to produce it again.

      Doesn't work, folks, and it could very well turn into a trap. When
      God prolongs prayer or gives us graces, fine! Relax, swim in His
      grace and enjoy it, but never, ever try to fill the pool for a quick
      dip on your own. That's not the way prayer- or God- works.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome,OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Continued prayers, please, for the Ted we prayed for yesterday, and prayers for another Ted, who seeks grace and discernment as he seeks God s will.
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 26, 2006
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        +PAX

        Continued prayers, please, for the Ted we prayed for yesterday, and prayers for another Ted, who seeks grace and discernment as he seeks God's will. Prayers for John, 24, troubles with focus and goal in choice of a life direction. Prayers for someone suffering badly from sexual temptation, for grace and strength from the Sacraments.

        A brief word about sexual troubles. They are often worse precisely because they ARE hidden, suffered alone. Believe me, nothing pleases Satan more than the decision to tough out such things alone! We need the help and the confidence of others. No, you cannot trust such matters to just anyone, but you really need to find someone you can prudently tell, someone you are not likely to act out with who can pray for you and share the burden. Secret sins of any kind cripple us. Don't let that happen. Please never hesitate to let me know that you need prayers. I will make them as anonymous as the request I posted today, not even any gender mentioned. Could be anyone in the world, but God knows for whom we are praying! I have suffered terribly from such temptations in my own life and, having been there, I know at least something of the pain they can cause. Please, please, never suffer alone. Let us all help! Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        February 26, June 27, October 27
        Chapter 20: On Reverence in Prayer

        When we wish to suggest our wants to persons of high station,
        we do not presume to do so
        except with humility and reverence.
        How much the more, then,
        are complete humility and pure devotion necessary
        in supplication of the Lord who is God of the universe!
        And let us be assured
        that it is not in saying a great deal that we shall be heard (Matt
        6:7),
        but in purity of heart and in tears of compunction.
        Our prayer, therefore, ought to be short and pure,
        unless it happens to be prolonged
        by an inspiration of divine grace.
        In community, however, let prayer be very short,
        and when the Superior gives the signal let all rise together.

        REFLECTION

        There is a necessary tension in Benedictine prayer, both public and
        private, between the awesome majesty and otherness of God and His
        infinite closeness and approachability. God is among us. He is not
        the guy next door, but neither is He some untouchable, easily
        offended emperor or sultan. Both these truths must be addressed in
        order to maintain a correct balance.

        God doesn't need ceremony, He doesn't need anything. All the high
        church in the world might (or might not...) tickle His fancy, but it
        does not one whit for Him personally. The rub here is that WE need
        what we offer to God, and that has been all too often forgotten in
        the last 40 years or so. In a very real and subtle sense, we BECOME
        what we offer to God, often quite unnoticed by ourselves.

        The upshot of all this is clear: offer God the lowest possible common
        denominator and that is what those offering will become; offer Him
        empty and presumptuous high church and be not surprised when those
        offering such things become rather pathetically silly themselves. In
        fact, sad fact, either extreme will make people pathetically silly
        and spiritually impoverished besides.

        Balance, always balance! The Holy Rule says "our prayer should short
        and pure." Fine, but the last part of that phrase has often gotten
        lost in the struggles of reform. Just plain short doesn't get it. God
        doesn't care about short, except insofar as it cheats us, those He
        loves.

        The balance of short AND pure will feed a normal soul well.
        Hence, if you find liturgy in any given place leaves you at least
        hungry and maybe starving, it's a safe guess that something might be
        wrong. God is still served, but His people often are not. That should
        upset both God and us.

        A very Benedictine warning here that the Carmelites would strongly
        approve: prayer is only to be prolonged by "inspiration of divine
        grace." When God does let us feel something wonderful in prayer, a
        very understandable temptation is to hang onto the feeling, to
        prolong it, to produce it again.

        Doesn't work, folks, and it could very well turn into a trap. When
        God prolongs prayer or gives us graces, fine! Relax, swim in His
        grace and enjoy it, but never, ever try to fill the pool for a quick
        dip on your own. That's not the way prayer- or God- works.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome,OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX Prayers for Bill Hayes, one of our Oblates, who has gone to God, for his happy death and eternal rest. We didn t learn of his death until just recently,
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 25, 2007
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          +PAX

          Prayers for Bill Hayes, one of our Oblates, who has gone to God, for his
          happy death and eternal rest. We didn't learn of his death until just recently,
          he actually died on Feb. 14.

          Prayers, please, for Dottie, for whom we've prayed before, her bronchitis
          continues and now she is sleeping for long periods of time. Her husband will
          take her for more testing Monday. Also, her Alzheimer's is worsening. Prayers
          for them both.

          Marie asks healing prayers for her two sons, 12 and 14. One suffers from 4
          conditions of the spine, and the younger one has just been diagnosed with a
          condition that is attacking his hip and wearing it out. Lord, help us all as You
          know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never
          absent, praise Him! Thanks os much. JL

          February 26, June 27, October 27
          Chapter 20: On Reverence in Prayer

          When we wish to suggest our wants to persons of high station,
          we do not presume to do so
          except with humility and reverence.
          How much the more, then,
          are complete humility and pure devotion necessary
          in supplication of the Lord who is God of the universe!
          And let us be assured
          that it is not in saying a great deal that we shall be heard (Matt
          6:7),
          but in purity of heart and in tears of compunction.
          Our prayer, therefore, ought to be short and pure,
          unless it happens to be prolonged
          by an inspiration of divine grace.
          In community, however, let prayer be very short,
          and when the Superior gives the signal let all rise together.

          REFLECTION

          There is a necessary tension in Benedictine prayer, both public and
          private, between the awesome majesty and otherness of God and His
          infinite closeness and approachability. God is among us. He is not
          the guy next door, but neither is He some untouchable, easily
          offended emperor or sultan. Both these truths must be addressed in
          order to maintain a correct balance.

          God doesn't need ceremony, He doesn't need anything. All the high
          church in the world might (or might not...) tickle His fancy, but it
          does not one whit for Him personally. The rub here is that WE need
          what we offer to God, and that has been all too often forgotten in
          the last 40 years or so. In a very real and subtle sense, we BECOME
          what we offer to God, often quite unnoticed by ourselves.

          The upshot of all this is clear: offer God the lowest possible common
          denominator and that is what those offering will become; offer Him
          empty and presumptuous high church and be not surprised when those
          offering such things become rather pathetically silly themselves. In
          fact, sad fact, either extreme will make people pathetically silly
          and spiritually impoverished besides.

          Balance, always balance! The Holy Rule says "our prayer should short
          and pure." Fine, but the last part of that phrase has often gotten
          lost in the struggles of reform. Just plain short doesn't get it. God
          doesn't care about short, except insofar as it cheats us, those He
          loves.

          The balance of short AND pure will feed a normal soul well.
          Hence, if you find liturgy in any given place leaves you at least
          hungry and maybe starving, it's a safe guess that something might be
          wrong. God is still served, but His people often are not. That should
          upset both God and us.

          A very Benedictine warning here that the Carmelites would strongly
          approve: prayer is only to be prolonged by "inspiration of divine
          grace." When God does let us feel something wonderful in prayer, a
          very understandable temptation is to hang onto the feeling, to
          prolong it, to produce it again.

          Doesn't work, folks, and it could very well turn into a trap. When
          God prolongs prayer or gives us graces, fine! Relax, swim in His
          grace and enjoy it, but never, ever try to fill the pool for a quick
          dip on your own. That's not the way prayer- or God- works.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome,OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
          Petersham, MA

          <BR><BR><BR>**************************************<BR> AOL now offers free
          email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at
          http://www.aol.com.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers, please, for me, flying to California. Michael LoPiccolo has faithfully and kindly offered to do the Holy Rule while I am gone and take prayer
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 25, 2008
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            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for me, flying to California. Michael LoPiccolo has faithfully and kindly offered to do the Holy Rule while I am gone and take prayer requests. Please note that I might not be checking my mail while giving the retreat, so intentions sent to me will not be passed on till I get home late Saturday night.

            Prayers, too, for the spiritual, mental and physical wellbeing of:

            Troy, aodelscent son (only child) of a single (heartsick and sorrowful) mom, bipolar and a handful and now in juevnile detention, and for his Mom.
            Lord, help us all as You
            know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never
            absent, praise Him! Thanks os much. JL

            February 26, June 27, October 27
            Chapter 20: On Reverence in Prayer

            When we wish to suggest our wants to persons of high station,
            we do not presume to do so
            except with humility and reverence.
            How much the more, then,
            are complete humility and pure devotion necessary
            in supplication of the Lord who is God of the universe!
            And let us be assured
            that it is not in saying a great deal that we shall be heard (Matt
            6:7),
            but in purity of heart and in tears of compunction.
            Our prayer, therefore, ought to be short and pure,
            unless it happens to be prolonged
            by an inspiration of divine grace.
            In community, however, let prayer be very short,
            and when the Superior gives the signal let all rise together.

            REFLECTION

            There is a necessary tension in Benedictine prayer, both public and
            private, between the awesome majesty and otherness of God and His
            infinite closeness and approachability. God is among us. He is not
            the guy next door, but neither is He some untouchable, easily
            offended emperor or sultan. Both these truths must be addressed in
            order to maintain a correct balance.

            God doesn't need ceremony, He doesn't need anything. All the high
            church in the world might (or might not...) tickle His fancy, but it
            does not one whit for Him personally. The rub here is that WE need
            what we offer to God, and that has been all too often forgotten in
            the last 40 years or so. In a very real and subtle sense, we BECOME
            what we offer to God, often quite unnoticed by ourselves.

            The upshot of all this is clear: offer God the lowest possible common
            denominator and that is what those offering will become; offer Him
            empty and presumptuous high church and be not surprised when those
            offering such things become rather pathetically silly themselves. In
            fact, sad fact, either extreme will make people pathetically silly
            and spiritually impoverished besides.

            Balance, always balance! The Holy Rule says "our prayer should short
            and pure." Fine, but the last part of that phrase has often gotten
            lost in the struggles of reform. Just plain short doesn't get it. God
            doesn't care about short, except insofar as it cheats us, those He
            loves.

            The balance of short AND pure will feed a normal soul well.
            Hence, if you find liturgy in any given place leaves you at least
            hungry and maybe starving, it's a safe guess that something might be
            wrong. God is still served, but His people often are not. That should
            upset both God and us.

            A very Benedictine warning here that the Carmelites would strongly
            approve: prayer is only to be prolonged by "inspiration of divine
            grace." When God does let us feel something wonderful in prayer, a
            very understandable temptation is to hang onto the feeling, to
            prolong it, to produce it again.

            Doesn't work, folks, and it could very well turn into a trap. When
            God prolongs prayer or gives us graces, fine! Relax, swim in His
            grace and enjoy it, but never, ever try to fill the pool for a quick
            dip on your own. That's not the way prayer- or God- works.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome,OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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