Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Holy Rule for Feb. 6

Expand Messages
  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Valerie, for whom we prayed. Now radiation and chemo are being tried for her inoperable cancer. Prayers for Susan, single Mom of 4,
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 6, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Valerie, for whom we prayed. Now radiation and chemo are being tried for her inoperable cancer. Prayers for Susan, single Mom of 4, her melanoma has spread to her abdominal region. Prayers for the 9 people who seemed to have committed group suicide in Japan. Prayers for Eva, 85, surgery for ovarian cancer, then chemo, and for her adult children, especially Gerry and Jim, who will be helping her. Her spirits are good, but they all need grace and strength. Prayers for two couples trying to start families and experiencing a lot of setbacks and difficulties. Prayers for M, spreading benign tumor on his wrist. Prayers for Jean, hoping her surgery will not interfere with her teaching, and now in the difficult and trying period of waiting to know results that is familiar to many of us. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

      February 6, June 7, October 7
      Chapter 7: On Humility

      The ninth degree of humility
      is that a monk restrain his tongue and keep silence,
      not speaking until he is questioned.
      For the Scripture shows
      that "in much speaking there is no escape from sin" (Prov. 10:19)
      and that "the talkative man is not stable on the earth" (Ps. 139:12).



      REFLECTION

      Well, you can safely bet that I fail this one right and left.

      Obedience is essential to humility, but as we climb the steps, other
      virtues that figure in humility are presented to us. Why is silence
      important? Because when someone like me is shooting his mouth off all
      the time, whether being really funny, or just thinking he is, offering the
      world choice observations of his "exquisite" wisdom, what's really
      going on is a desire to be at the center of things, to be star and
      protagonist. Lights, camera, action! Why?

      If I am bored- and I often am- I make a joke, create my own
      excitement, change the human situation I have walked into to suit MY
      needs. Maybe they weren't bored at all, even if they politely laugh
      and seem to enjoy it. That trait doesn't say much for my depth.

      I need to be entertained? Hello!?!? Can't I find enough material in
      silence to keep me busy? What's really going on here? Short attention
      span much? I can get so absorbed in elevating humor and speech as
      positive, necessary goods that I can easily forget that both can be
      tools of control, and control is not for the humble.

      Naming that does not mean I do not have to work at change. I do. I
      think it was Flannery O'Connor who said that accepting ourselves does
      not preclude an effort to be better. Change may be so gradual that
      none will ever notice, but every time I resist any useless temptation
      to open my mouth, there is a small victory.

      Face it, we think a lot of what we have to say is important because we
      think WE are important, or funny or skilled more than others. We truly have
      divinely created dignity, but that is not usually what is employed in making
      these decisions to speak!

      Silence is not incompatible with charity or cheerfulness. Brother
      David Gormican, OSB, of St. Leo, now gone to God, was a paragon of
      this step (actually, of all of them!) Brother would speak first if he
      needed something, but otherwise, he waited until he was spoken to or
      asked something. No surprise that he usually looked very recollected:
      he was!

      When he was called on to speak, it was always cheerfully and
      with something I can only describe as sweetness. I don't mean he was
      sugary, I mean sweetness in the best possible sense. When Brother
      David DID speak, one would never think that silence was unloving; all
      his compassion and love just shone right through.

      Brother David was truly a saint. No doubt, had he wished to run off
      at the mouth as I do, he could have given you all much better and
      deeper wisdom and holiness than me. But part of his holiness was
      silence and his humility left people far less bright (like me,) to
      talk all they wanted, unchallenged. On the rare occasion when he
      wouldn't leave something unchallenged, the weight of a well-chosen
      phrase or two of his would offset pages of prose! Part of the reason
      his words bore such weight is that he was so usually silent that
      people LISTENED when he spoke. Sadly, that is not true for most of us.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please for the happy death and eternal rest of Jason Robida and his victims. Fleeing from a manhunt after he attacked several people in a gay bar
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 6, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        +PAX

        Prayers, please for the happy death and eternal rest of Jason Robida and his victims. Fleeing from a manhunt after he attacked several people in a gay bar with a gun and hatchet, he was finally cornered many states away, first killing his female companion and a police officer before being killed himself. A tragic, tragic mess. May he and his victims embrace God's infinite Divine Mercy, which is offered to all, and may that Mercy take them all to His Heart. Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        February 6, June 7, October 7
        Chapter 7: On Humility

        The ninth degree of humility
        is that a monk restrain his tongue and keep silence,
        not speaking until he is questioned.
        For the Scripture shows
        that "in much speaking there is no escape from sin" (Prov. 10:19)
        and that "the talkative man is not stable on the earth" (Ps. 139:12).



        REFLECTION

        Well, you can safely bet that I fail this one right and left.

        Obedience is essential to humility, but as we climb the steps, other
        virtues that figure in humility are presented to us. Why is silence
        important? Because when someone like me is shooting his mouth off all
        the time, whether being really funny, or just thinking he is, offering the
        world choice observations of his "exquisite" wisdom, what's really
        going on is a desire to be at the center of things, to be star and
        protagonist. Lights, camera, action! Why?

        If I am bored- and I often am- I make a joke, create my own
        excitement, change the human situation I have walked into to suit MY
        needs. Maybe they weren't bored at all, even if they politely laugh
        and seem to enjoy it. That trait doesn't say much for my depth.

        I need to be entertained? Hello!?!? Can't I find enough material in
        silence to keep me busy? What's really going on here? Short attention
        span much? I can get so absorbed in elevating humor and speech as
        positive, necessary goods that I can easily forget that both can be
        tools of control, and control is not for the humble.

        Naming that does not mean I do not have to work at change. I do. I
        think it was Flannery O'Connor who said that accepting ourselves does
        not preclude an effort to be better. Change may be so gradual that
        none will ever notice, but every time I resist any useless temptation
        to open my mouth, there is a small victory.

        Face it, we think a lot of what we have to say is important because we
        think WE are important, or funny or more clever than others. We truly have
        divinely created dignity, but that is not usually what is employed in making
        these decisions to speak!

        Silence is not incompatible with charity or cheerfulness. Brother
        David Gormican, OSB, of St. Leo, now gone to God, was a paragon of
        this step (actually, of all of them!) Brother would speak first if he
        needed something, but otherwise, he waited until he was spoken to or
        asked something. No surprise that he usually looked very recollected:
        he was!

        When he was called on to speak, it was always cheerfully and
        with something I can only describe as sweetness. I don't mean he was
        sugary, I mean sweetness in the best possible sense. When Brother
        David DID speak, one would never think that silence was unloving; all
        his compassion and love just shone right through.

        Brother David was truly a saint. No doubt, had he wished to run off
        at the mouth as I do, he could have given you all much better and
        deeper wisdom and holiness than me. But part of his holiness was
        silence and his humility allowed people far less bright (like me,) to
        talk all they wanted, unchallenged.

        On the rare occasion when he wouldn't leave something unchallenged,
        the weight of a well-chosen phrase or two of his would offset pages of prose!
        Part of the reason his words bore such weight is that he was so usually silent that
        people LISTENED when he spoke. Sadly, that is not true for most of us.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX Prayers, please, for Emma, Gerry and Jim s Mom, who is going to re-start chemo tomorrow, and for all her family. Also, for Sue who is going for blood work
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 5, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for Emma, Gerry and Jim's Mom, who is going to re-start
          chemo tomorrow, and for all her family. Also, for Sue who is going for blood
          work for her chronic leukemia, and for her sister Carol who is going for a
          biopsy for breast cancer. Prayers, too, for Matthew who is ill.

          Prayers for Matt, who has been hospitalized with a brain infection. He's on
          both high doses of antibiotics and
          morphine for the pain. He was told that he will continue to have these
          excruciatingly painful cluster headaches for the rest of his life. Prayers for
          Bob, who is dying, and for his wife, Virginia. They are elderly, and he has been
          failing for a long time. Prayers for Beverly, who suffered third degree
          burns over 30% of her body and is in critical condition. (Her clothes caught fire
          as she reached over the stove while cooking.)

          Prayers for Mary Ann, rare and aggressive form of bone cancer, which appears
          to have become terminal, probably only a few weeks left. Prayers for her
          happy death and eternal rest with God, for her husband, Joe, and for her
          children: Maggie, Joanna, Thomas and Stephen. Prayers, too, for John and his family,
          they are very close to Mary Ann and her family and this is especially hard
          for them.

          Prayers for Shirley, dislocated shoulder, a lot of pain and possible torn
          rotator cuff. These injuries are impacting her at her work, since she cannot do
          many of the things she needs to do and has to ask others for help. Lord, help
          us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God
          is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          February 6, June 7, October 7
          Chapter 7: On Humility

          The ninth degree of humility
          is that a monk restrain his tongue and keep silence,
          not speaking until he is questioned.
          For the Scripture shows
          that "in much speaking there is no escape from sin" (Prov. 10:19)
          and that "the talkative man is not stable on the earth" (Ps. 139:12).



          REFLECTION

          Well, you can safely bet that I fail this one right and left.

          Obedience is essential to humility, but as we climb the steps, other
          virtues that figure in humility are presented to us. Why is silence
          important? Because when someone like me is shooting his mouth off all
          the time, whether being really funny, or just thinking he is, offering the
          world choice observations of his "exquisite" wisdom, what's really
          going on is a desire to be at the center of things, to be star and
          protagonist. Lights, camera, action! Why?

          If I am bored- and I often am- I make a joke, create my own
          excitement, change the human situation I have walked into to suit MY
          needs. Maybe others weren't bored at all, even if they politely laugh
          and seem to enjoy it. That trait doesn't say much for my depth.

          I need to be entertained? Hello!?!? Can't I find enough material in
          silence to keep me busy? What's really going on here? Short attention
          span much? I can get so absorbed in elevating humor and speech as
          positive, necessary goods that I can easily forget that both can be
          tools of control, and control is not for the humble.

          Naming that does not mean I do not have to work at change. I do. I
          think it was Flannery O'Connor who said that accepting ourselves does
          not preclude an effort to be better. Change may be so gradual that
          none will ever notice, but every time I resist any useless temptation
          to open my mouth, there is a small victory.

          Face it, we think a lot of what we have to say is important because we
          think WE are important, or funny or clever. We truly have divinely created
          dignity, but that is not usually what is employed in making these decisions
          to speak!

          Silence is not incompatible with charity or cheerfulness. Brother
          David Gormican, OSB, of St. Leo, now gone to God, was a paragon of
          this step (actually, of all of them!) Brother would speak first if he
          needed something, but otherwise, he waited until he was spoken to or
          asked something. No surprise that he usually looked very recollected:
          he was!

          When he was called on to speak, it was always cheerfully and
          with something I can only describe as sweetness. I don't mean he was
          sugary, I mean sweetness in the best possible sense. When Brother
          David DID speak, one would never think that silence was unloving; all
          his compassion and love just shone right through.

          Brother David was truly a saint. No doubt, had he wished to run off
          at the mouth as I do, he could have given you all much better and
          deeper wisdom and holiness than me. But part of his holiness was
          silence and his humility allowed people far less bright (like me,) to
          talk all they wanted, unchallenged.

          On the rare occasion when he wouldn't leave something unchallenged,
          the weight of a well-chosen phrase or two of his would offset pages of prose!
          Part of the reason his words bore such weight is that he was so usually
          silent
          that people LISTENED when he spoke. Sadly, that is not true for most of us.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
          Petersham, MA









          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX For the spirirtual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them: Suzanne, 47, ill for six weeks
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 5, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            +PAX

            For the spirirtual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

            Suzanne, 47, ill for six weeks with pneumonia and no sick pay time.

            Katrina's family, multiple needs and for her husband, John, and she, that they remain strong during this trials:son, Matthew 15, was just diagnosied with JRA (Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis) and his steroids are making him physically sick but they are helping with the stiffness in his joints. Also, we are being sued by the people aother son, Joe 18, had a motor vehicle accident with over three months ago. Also, my father-in-law just fell off the stairs and now has limited motion is in legs. AND my oldest son's application was put on hold for the college of his choice.

            Scotttie, 79, knee replacement, and for her daughter, Liz, to be there for her and pray aright for all.

            Kevan, a spate of TIA's, had a stroke in 2000, doctors trying to figure out what is wrong.

            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL



            February 6, June 7, October 7
            Chapter 7: On Humility

            The ninth degree of humility
            is that a monk restrain his tongue and keep silence,
            not speaking until he is questioned.
            For the Scripture shows
            that "in much speaking there is no escape from sin" (Prov. 10:19)
            and that "the talkative man is not stable on the earth" (Ps. 139:12).



            REFLECTION

            Well, you can safely bet that I fail this one right and left.

            Obedience is essential to humility, but as we climb the steps, other
            virtues that figure in humility are presented to us. Why is silence
            important? Because when someone like me is shooting his mouth off all
            the time, whether being really funny, or just thinking he is, offering the
            world choice observations of his "exquisite" wisdom, what's really
            going on is a desire to be at the center of things, to be star and
            protagonist. Lights, camera, action! Why?

            If I am bored- and I often am- I make a joke, create my own
            excitement, change the human situation I have walked into to suit MY
            needs. Maybe others weren't bored at all, even if they politely laugh
            and seem to enjoy it. That trait doesn't say much for my depth.

            I need to be entertained? Hello!?!? Can't I find enough material in
            silence to keep me busy? What's really going on here? Short attention
            span much? I can get so absorbed in elevating humor and speech as
            positive, necessary goods that I can easily forget that both can be
            tools of control, and control is not for the humble.

            Naming that does not mean I do not have to work at change. I do. I
            think it was Flannery O'Connor who said that accepting ourselves does
            not preclude an effort to be better. Change may be so gradual that
            none will ever notice, but every time I resist any useless temptation
            to open my mouth, there is a small victory.

            Face it, we think a lot of what we have to say is important because we
            think WE are important, or funny or clever. We truly have divinely created
            dignity, but that is not usually what is employed in making these decisions
            to speak!

            Silence is not incompatible with charity or cheerfulness. Brother
            David Gormican, OSB, of St. Leo, now gone to God, was a paragon of
            this step (actually, of all of them!) Brother would speak first if he
            needed something, but otherwise, he waited until he was spoken to or
            asked something. No surprise that he usually looked very recollected:
            he was!

            When he was called on to speak, it was always cheerfully and
            with something I can only describe as sweetness. I don't mean he was
            sugary, I mean sweetness in the best possible sense. When Brother
            David DID speak, one would never think that silence was unloving; all
            his compassion and love just shone right through.

            Brother David was truly a saint. No doubt, had he wished to run off
            at the mouth as I do, he could have given you all much better and
            deeper wisdom and holiness than me. But part of his holiness was
            silence and his humility allowed people far less bright (like me,) to
            talk all they wanted, unchallenged.

            On the rare occasion when he wouldn't leave something unchallenged,
            the weight of a well-chosen phrase or two of his would offset pages of prose!
            Part of the reason his words bore such weight is that he was so usually
            silent that people LISTENED when he spoke. Sadly, that is not true for most of us.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.