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Holy Rule for Jan. 30

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers for Michael Ross, on death row in Connecticut, whose execution was stopped within one hour or so last week and rescheduled for tomorrow night.
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 30 5:41 AM
      +PAX

      Prayers for Michael Ross, on death row in Connecticut, whose execution was stopped within one hour or so last week and rescheduled for tomorrow night. For all his victims and their families, for his family and for his happy death, whenever and however that occurs. If he is executed, it will be the first in more than 40 years in New England. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

      January 30, May 31, September 30

      Chapter 7: On Humility
      The second degree of humility
      is that a person love not his own will
      nor take pleasure in satisfying his desires,
      but model his actions on the saying of the Lord,
      "I have come not to do My own will,
      but the will of Him who sent Me" (John 6:38).
      It is written also,
      "Self-will has its punishment,
      but constraint wins a crown."

      REFLECTION

      OK, who doesn't love their own will, or take pleasure in satisfying
      their desires? Who doesn't love their sexuality or some of the
      dearest things they own and treasure? For a healthy person, all of
      these are very normal loves. For some of us, one or another of these
      loves is very much part of our vocation, for example, in marriage
      one's sexuality is the very means of self-gift. The key is to keep
      them ordinate, in line and yes, balanced!

      The means to this step is neither to go overboard hunting for things
      we hate to afflict ourselves with nor to insist on our own way at all
      costs. The real meaning here is found in the statement that Christ
      came not to do His own will, but the will of His Father. We don't see
      Jesus going out His way to find things distasteful to Him, nor do we
      see Him stoically and resolutely refusing to enjoy things His Father
      wills that please Him. His will is one with the Father's. He also has
      a human nature that wars against that Divine will, but, in Jesus, it
      never wins.

      Alas, in us, that human will often DOES win: why else would we be
      struggling along the monastic way all our lives? Unlike Jesus, we are
      not sinless, we are able to sin and often do so all too gladly! We
      must daily- even minute to minute- turn from the bad in our own
      wills. It is an ongoing fight, but that is what conversatio morum
      means! As Benedictines we will- indeed, must- always be straining
      against the negative goad, always be seeking the place of greater
      light and good.

      The will of God is frequently very hard to see. For some of us, at
      some times, it is downright impossible to see. There will always be
      times when we must trundle along blindly, without our senses to
      reassure us. That is why trust is such an integral part of our
      monastic struggle. At those times, the only way haltingly forward is
      to embrace the blinding darkness before us and firmly, trustingly
      clutch the merciful hand of Christ. Jesus, I trust in You!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Donna, for strength in teaching a new class of very difficult students, and for the patience and care of all concerned. For Ann, 30
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 30 6:06 AM
        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Donna, for strength in teaching a new class of very difficult students, and for the patience and care of all concerned. For Ann, 30 years of multiple knee and leg surgeries, now in danger of amputation of her leg, also for her daughter, Barbara, remarrying her husband whom she divorced 17 years ago. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        January 30, May 31, September 30

        Chapter 7: On Humility
        The second degree of humility
        is that a person love not his own will
        nor take pleasure in satisfying his desires,
        but model his actions on the saying of the Lord,
        "I have come not to do My own will,
        but the will of Him who sent Me" (John 6:38).
        It is written also,
        "Self-will has its punishment,
        but constraint wins a crown."

        REFLECTION

        OK, who doesn't love their own will, or take pleasure in satisfying
        their desires? Who doesn't love the dearest things they own and
        treasure? For a healthy person, all of these are very normal loves.
        For some of us, one or another of these loves is very much part of
        our vocation, for example, in marriage one's sexuality is the very means
        of self-gift. The key is to keep them ordinate, in line and yes, balanced!

        The means to this step is neither to go overboard hunting for things
        we hate to afflict ourselves with nor to insist on our own way at all
        costs. The real meaning here is found in the statement that Christ
        came not to do His own will, but the will of His Father. We don't see
        Jesus going out His way to find things distasteful to Him, nor do we
        see Him stoically and resolutely refusing to enjoy things His Father
        wills that please Him. His will is one with the Father's. He also has
        a human nature that wars against that Divine will, but, in Jesus, it
        never wins.

        Alas, in us, that human will often DOES win: why else would we be
        struggling along the monastic way all our lives? Unlike Jesus, we are
        not sinless, we are able to sin and often do so all too gladly! We
        must daily- even minute to minute- turn from the bad in our own
        wills. It is an ongoing fight, but that is what conversatio morum means,
        the commitment to live monastically, to reform our lives monastically.
        As Benedictines we will- indeed, must- always be straining
        against the negative goad, always be seeking the place of greater
        light and good.

        The will of God is frequently very hard to see. For some of us, at
        some times, it seems downright impossible to see. There will always be
        times when we must trundle along blindly, without our senses to
        reassure us. That is why trust is such an integral part of our
        monastic struggle. At those times, the only way haltingly forward is
        to embrace the blinding darkness before us and firmly, trustingly
        clutch the merciful hand of Christ. Jesus, I trust in You!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX Prayers, please, for safe travels for Katherine as she travels to Guatemala to be with a toddler, Grace, whom she and her husband Steven hope to adopt.
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 29 6:37 PM
          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for safe travels for Katherine as she travels to Guatemala
          to be with a toddler, Grace, whom she and her husband Steven hope to adopt.
          They've previously adopted Grace's biological brother Travis who is with them
          in the States. Prayers for Pam as she recovers from pneumonia. Prayers for
          Michael, a naval officer being deployed to Iraq for 6 months on ground duty,
          also for his wife Susan and all their family, especially their special needs
          daughter, Kaitlin. Prayers of Deo gratias and thanks from C., her school where
          she teaches is staying open and another promising job interview has been
          arranged, too.


          Prayers for Dot, having knee replacement surgery for her right knee. She is
          about 70 so this isn't going to be a "walk in the park" recovery. She has
          to have her other knee done in a few months, also. Prayers for Ann, 30's,
          having surgery for thyroid cancer, and for her Oblate husband, and all their
          family. Prayers for Preston, in critical condition in ICU after internal injuries
          from a car accident, also for a passenger in his car who was critically
          injured, too. Prayers for Roxanne, continued severe neck pain since a car
          accident several months ago.

          Prayers for Kate, 21, her follow-up pap smear after surgical treatment is
          nearly the same as the first problematic one, to be tested again in 4 months,
          and for her very worried Mom. Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's
          will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so
          much. JL

          January 30, May 31, September 30

          Chapter 7: On Humility
          The second degree of humility
          is that a person love not his own will
          nor take pleasure in satisfying his desires,
          but model his actions on the saying of the Lord,
          "I have come not to do My own will,
          but the will of Him who sent Me" (John 6:38).
          It is written also,
          "Self-will has its punishment,
          but constraint wins a crown."

          REFLECTION

          OK, who doesn't love their own will, or take pleasure in satisfying
          their desires? Who doesn't love the dearest things they own and
          treasure? For a healthy person, all of these are very normal loves.
          For some of us, one or another of these loves is very much part of
          our vocation, for example, in marriage one's sexuality is the very means
          of self-gift. The key is to keep them ordinate, in line and yes, balanced!

          The means to this step is neither to go overboard hunting for things
          we hate to afflict ourselves with nor to insist on our own way at all
          costs. The real meaning here is found in the statement that Christ
          came not to do His own will, but the will of His Father. We don't see
          Jesus going out His way to find things distasteful to Him, nor do we
          see Him stoically and resolutely refusing to enjoy things His Father
          wills that please Him. His will is one with the Father's. He also has
          a human nature that wars against that Divine will, but, in Jesus, it
          never wins.

          Alas, in us, that human will often DOES win: why else would we be
          struggling along the monastic way all our lives? Unlike Jesus, we are
          not sinless, we are able to sin and often do so all too gladly! We
          must daily- even minute to minute- turn from the bad in our own
          wills. It is an ongoing fight, but that is what conversatio morum means,
          the commitment to live monastically, to reform our lives monastically.
          As Benedictines we will- indeed, must- always be straining
          against the negative goad, always be seeking the place of greater
          light and good.

          The will of God is frequently very hard to see. For some of us, at
          some times, it seems downright impossible to see. There will always be
          times when we must trundle along blindly, without our senses to
          reassure us. That is why trust is such an integral part of our
          monastic struggle. At those times, the only way haltingly forward is
          to embrace the blinding darkness before us and firmly, trustingly
          clutch the merciful hand of Christ. Jesus, I trust in You!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
          Petersham, MA







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Archbishop Christodoulos, 69, leader of Greece s Orthodox Christians, who died from cancer.
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 29 8:33 AM
            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for the happy death and eternal rest of Archbishop Christodoulos, 69, leader of Greece's Orthodox Christians, who died from cancer.

            Prayers for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

            Des, in his 70s, was to have had an operation on his hip ... the other hip has been done , the surgeon has just told him that his heart would not stand another op ... Des is devistated and is making life very traumatic for his wife Nancey.

            Vivien who is in an explosive work situation.

            Deo gratias, N's bone scan went smoothly, now waiting to hear the results, so continued prayers.

            L., discernment of vocation.

            In Saskachtewan, all the homeless people, children who are not dressed properly and all the animals for shelter and warmth as they have a temperature of -50 F with the windchill.

            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            January 30, May 31, September 30

            Chapter 7: On Humility
            The second degree of humility
            is that a person love not his own will
            nor take pleasure in satisfying his desires,
            but model his actions on the saying of the Lord,
            "I have come not to do My own will,
            but the will of Him who sent Me" (John 6:38).
            It is written also,
            "Self-will has its punishment,
            but constraint wins a crown."

            REFLECTION

            OK, who doesn't love their own will, or take pleasure in satisfying
            their desires? Who doesn't love the dearest things they own and
            treasure? For a healthy person, all of these are very normal loves.
            For some of us, one or another of these loves is very much part of
            our vocation, for example, in marriage one's sexuality is the very means
            of self-gift. The key is to keep them ordinate, in line and yes, balanced!

            The means to this step is neither to go overboard hunting for things
            we hate to afflict ourselves with nor to insist on our own way at all
            costs. The real meaning here is found in the statement that Christ
            came not to do His own will, but the will of His Father. We don't see
            Jesus going out His way to find things distasteful to Him, nor do we
            see Him stoically and resolutely refusing to enjoy things His Father
            wills that please Him. His will is one with the Father's. He also has
            a human nature that wars against that Divine will, but, in Jesus, it
            never wins.

            Alas, in us, that human will often DOES win: why else would we be
            struggling along the monastic way all our lives? Unlike Jesus, we are
            not sinless, we are able to sin and often do so all too gladly! We
            must daily- even minute to minute- turn from the bad in our own
            wills. It is an ongoing fight, but that is what conversatio morum means,
            the commitment to live monastically, to reform our lives monastically.
            As Benedictines we will- indeed, must- always be straining
            against the negative goad, always be seeking the place of greater
            light and good.

            The will of God is frequently very hard to see. For some of us, at
            some times, it seems downright impossible to see. There will always be
            times when we must trundle along blindly, without our senses to
            reassure us. That is why trust is such an integral part of our
            monastic struggle. At those times, the only way haltingly forward is
            to embrace the blinding darkness before us and firmly, trustingly
            clutch the merciful hand of Christ. Jesus, I trust in You!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA










            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX Prayers for Paul Z., on his birthday, graces galore and many more, ad multos annos! Prayers for Bob, who is hurting. Ardent prayers for Anthony, who is in
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 29 3:32 PM

              +PAX

               

              Prayers for Paul Z., on his birthday, graces galore and many more, ad multos annos!

               

              Prayers for Bob, who is hurting.

               

              Ardent prayers for Anthony, who is in surgical ICU with a fractured skull and cranial bleed and bleeding from both ears after an injury playing hockey. Prayers, too, for his son, Andrew and for his parents, Richard and Mary Lou.

               

              Prayers for the eternal rest of Peggy, and for all her family and all who mourn her, especially Bob.

               

              Prayers for Brian, who is deeply grieving the loss of his 13 yr. old dog, Isaac. He is a cardiac patient and the loss is affecting him severely.

               

              Continued prayers for David and Neesha and their unborn child, for a healthy baby and a safe pregnancy and delivery. Theirs is a high risk pregnancy after many years of infertility, so let us keep them in prayer throughout.

               

              Prayers for Joel and Tim, trying to set up some Latin studies, a great spiritual work of mercy. May both grow in grace and profit from this.

               

              Prayers for Michael to go to Confession and Communion.

               

              Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and
              grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              January 30, May 31, September 30

              Chapter 7: On Humility
              The second degree of humility
              is that a person love not his own will
              nor take pleasure in satisfying his desires,
              but model his actions on the saying of the Lord,
              "I have come not to do My own will,
              but the will of Him who sent Me" (John 6:38).
              It is written also,
              "Self-will has its punishment,
              but constraint wins a crown."

              REFLECTION

              OK, who doesn't love their own will, or take pleasure in satisfying
              their desires? Who doesn't love the dearest things they own and
              treasure? For a healthy person, all of these are very normal loves.
              For some of us, one or another of these loves can be very much part of
              our vocation. The key is to keep them ordered, in line and yes, balanced!

              The means to this step is neither to go overboard hunting for things
              we hate to afflict ourselves with nor to insist on our own way at all
              costs. The real meaning here is found in the statement that Christ
              came not to do His own will, but the will of His Father, even in Gethsemane,
              even on the Cross.

              Alas, sometimes our own will DOES win: why else would we be
              struggling along the monastic way all our lives? Unlike Jesus, we are
              not sinless, we are able to sin and often do so all too gladly! We
              must daily- even minute to minute- turn from the bad in our own
              wills. It is an ongoing fight, but that is what conversatio morum means,
              the commitment to live monastically, to reform our lives monastically.
              As Benedictines we will- indeed, must- always be straining
              against the negative goad, always be seeking the place of greater
              light and good.

              The will of God is frequently very hard to see. For some of us, at
              some times, it seems downright impossible to see. There will always be
              times when we must trundle along blindly, without our senses to
              reassure us. That is why trust is such an integral part of our
              monastic struggle. At those times, the only way haltingly forward is
              to embrace the blinding darkness before us and firmly, trustingly
              clutch the merciful hand of Christ. Jesus, I trust in You!

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA

               

               

               

               

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