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Holy Rule for Jan. 2

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers for the strength and grace for all who made good New Year s resolutions, that they may keep them! Prayers, too, for Fr. Richard, a priest who
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 2 5:47 AM
      +PAX

      Prayers for the strength and grace for all who made good New Year's resolutions, that they may keep them! Prayers, too, for Fr. Richard, a priest who killed himself two years ago yesterday after a child abuse allegation. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much. JL

      January 2, May 3, September 2
      Prologue

      Let us arise, then, at last,
      for the Scripture stirs us up, saying,
      "Now is the hour for us to rise from sleep" (Rom. 18:11).
      Let us open our eyes to the deifying light,
      let us hear with attentive ears
      the warning which the divine voice cries daily to us,
      "Today if you hear His voice,
      harden not your hearts" (Ps. 94:8).
      And again,
      "Whoever has ears to hear,
      hear what the Spirit says to the churches" (Matt. 11-15; Apoc. 2:7).
      And what does He say?
      "Come, My children, listen to Me;
      I will teach you the fear of the Lord" (Ps. 33:12).
      "Run while you have the light of life,
      lest the darkness of death overtake you" (John 12:35).

      REFLECTION

      St. Benedict, just by virtue of the period in which he lived, would
      have been rather more attuned to the Eastern Church Fathers than many
      in the West are today. Not for nothing does he also recommend St.
      Basil's Rule to his monastics! Given all this, the phrase "deifying
      light", which probably strikes most Westerners as just a lovely bit
      of poetry, would ring altogether different bells in Eastern minds,
      and may well have rung those bells in the mind of St. Benedict
      himself..

      Deification, the process of humanity becoming more God-like, is a
      central theme of Eastern spirituality, a favorite theme of the
      Fathers and a big central issue in Eastern monasticism. The whole
      idea of the Incarnation is viewed as God becoming Man so that man
      could be deified. (Don't take that term "deified" literally. The idea
      was that people became God-like, not that they literally became
      gods!) But there was a profound awareness of grace allowing us to
      share in God's life and to become ever more like Him, of being ever
      more intimately united with the Triune Life.

      Put another way, the East would say that we were created in the image
      and likeness of God, but we have lost the likeness. Deification,
      monastic struggle, the spiritual life, all of these strive to regain
      that likeness. We so often speak of balance, but what does that
      balance entail? It is this very deification, it is the closest
      attempt we can make to restore the rightness of Eden. It is our halt
      and lame effort to become what God intended us to be, as closely as
      we can in a fallen world.

      So, as we continue our loving Father's pep talk at the beginning of
      his Holy Rule, let us resolve to never again let that
      phrase "deifying light" slip past our eyes as just another literary
      device. No way! Deification and Light are what we are all about.
      Shine on, dear brothers and sisters, shine on!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      jeromeleo@...

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Jim S., death anniversary this week, and for his grandson, George and all his family. Prayers for a paralyzed nun (I have no name,)
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 1 8:09 PM
        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Jim S., death anniversary this week, and for his
        grandson, George and all his family. Prayers for a paralyzed nun (I have no name,)
        that Our Lady may grant her serenity, or even healing if God wills. Prayers
        for Cindy, who has breast cancer and will have her ovaries removed in the very
        near future. Prayers of Deo gratias and thanks for Gerry and Eva, who
        celebrated their 31st wedding anniversary last week. Lord, help us all as You know
        and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent,
        praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        January 2, May 3, September 2
        Prologue (continued)

        Let us arise, then, at last,
        for the Scripture stirs us up, saying,
        "Now is the hour for us to rise from sleep" (Rom. 18:11).
        Let us open our eyes to the deifying light,
        let us hear with attentive ears
        the warning which the divine voice cries daily to us,
        "Today if you hear His voice,
        harden not your hearts" (Ps. 94:8).
        And again,
        "Whoever has ears to hear,
        hear what the Spirit says to the churches" (Matt. 11-15; Apoc. 2:7).
        And what does He say?
        "Come, My children, listen to Me;
        I will teach you the fear of the Lord" (Ps. 33:12).
        "Run while you have the light of life,
        lest the darkness of death overtake you" (John 12:35).

        REFLECTION

        Check out the similarities of this section, at the beginning of the
        Holy Rule, and the readings of early Lent, which stress that "now is
        the acceptable time." It brings to mind St. Benedict's later chapter
        which says that the monastic life ought always to have some semblance
        of Lent.

        That perpetual Lent chapter is the source of a lot of grumbling about
        austerity from one camp and cheering about it from another. Both may
        have missed a salient point. Perhaps the greatest element of
        perpetual Lent has less to do with austerity- even the monastic fast
        did not last all year. What IS perpetually in style is wakefulness
        and self-examination.

        Monastic life withers in either smugness or a rut. What St. Benedict
        wants us to do is always to try and stay at that serious moment of
        taking inventory that many of us feel at Lent's beginning. We need to
        always be checking what needs to be cleaned up and we need to be
        prepared, even a bit eager, to start working on it.

        This is why a daily examination of conscience is so necessary.
        Compline, the traditional liturgical place for such examens, is a
        very apt place for same. As we prepare for sleep, which prefigures
        death, we prepare also for death, by examining our faults and asking
        forgiveness.

        The Holy Rule, like Lent, is by no means the gateway to an easier
        life, but to a holier one. As we actually grow in holiness much of it
        will become easier, more natural to us. But until that time, it is a
        struggle and, in unconquered areas, it remains something of a
        struggle for all of our lives. What's hard about that struggle isn't
        fasting or penance, but changing ourselves. Austere practices are
        just a means to that end, not ends in themselves.

        The whole idea of Lent and the Holy Rule is lasting change for the
        better. Lent is a seasonal construct to get us to begin anew, the
        Holy Rule says that beginning anew must be a daily thing. Lent is an
        attempt to get us to do for forty days what we ought to have been
        doing all year. The Holy Rule is a way to do what we ought to do all
        year, every day.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
        brjeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Br. Jerome Leo
        +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of Sr. Gemma s Mom and Br. Isidore s Dad, both of whom are ill, and for both monastics and
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 1 8:56 AM
          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of Sr. Gemma's Mom and Br. Isidore's Dad, both of whom are ill, and for both monastics and all their families. Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          January 2, May 3, September 2
          Prologue (continued)

          Let us arise, then, at last,
          for the Scripture stirs us up, saying,
          "Now is the hour for us to rise from sleep" (Rom. 18:11).
          Let us open our eyes to the deifying light,
          let us hear with attentive ears
          the warning which the divine voice cries daily to us,
          "Today if you hear His voice,
          harden not your hearts" (Ps. 94:8).
          And again,
          "Whoever has ears to hear,
          hear what the Spirit says to the churches" (Matt. 11-15; Apoc. 2:7).
          And what does He say?
          "Come, My children, listen to Me;
          I will teach you the fear of the Lord" (Ps. 33:12).
          "Run while you have the light of life,
          lest the darkness of death overtake you" (John 12:35).

          REFLECTION

          Check out the similarities of this section, at the beginning of the
          Holy Rule, and the readings of early Lent, which stress that "now is
          the acceptable time." It brings to mind St. Benedict's later chapter
          which says that the monastic life ought always to have some semblance
          of Lent.

          That perpetual Lent chapter is the source of a lot of grumbling about
          austerity from one camp and cheering about it from another. Both may
          have missed a salient point. Perhaps the greatest element of
          perpetual Lent has less to do with austerity- even the monastic fast
          did not last all year. What IS perpetually in style is wakefulness
          and self-examination.

          Monastic life withers in either smugness or a rut. What St. Benedict
          wants us to do is always to try and stay at that serious moment of
          taking inventory that many of us feel at Lent's beginning. We need to
          always be checking what needs to be cleaned up and we need to be
          prepared, even a bit eager, to start working on it.

          This is why a daily examination of conscience is so necessary.
          Compline, the traditional liturgical place for such examens, is a
          very apt place for same. As we prepare for sleep, which prefigures
          death, we prepare also for death, by examining our faults and asking
          forgiveness.

          The Holy Rule, like Lent, is by no means the gateway to an easier
          life, but to a holier one. As we actually grow in holiness much of it
          will become easier, more natural to us. But until that time, it is a
          struggle and, in unconquered areas, it remains something of a
          struggle for all of our lives. What's hard about that struggle isn't
          fasting or penance, but changing ourselves. Austere practices are
          just a means to that end, not ends in themselves.

          The whole idea of Lent and the Holy Rule is lasting change for the
          better. Lent is a seasonal construct to get us to begin anew, the
          Holy Rule says that beginning anew must be a daily thing. Lent is an
          attempt to get us to do for forty days what we ought to have been
          doing all year. The Holy Rule is a way to do what we ought to do all
          year, every day.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
          Petersham, MA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers, please, for the eternal rest of our Sr. Mary Clare, foundress and first Prioress of St. Scholastica Priory, on the first anniversary of her
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 1 3:37 PM

            +PAX

             

            Prayers, please, for the eternal rest of our Sr. Mary Clare, foundress and first Prioress of St. Scholastica Priory, on the first anniversary of her death. We owe her so much, there would be no Petersham communities without her, and so many of us have a monastic home because of her. Prayers, too, for her family, and for the nuns and monks of Petersham. May she rest in peace and rise in glory!

             

            Prayers for the eternal rest of Br. Benedict Cooper, OSB, of St. Leo Abbey, and for his family and Community and all who mourn him.

             

            Prayers for the eternal rest of Ruth, and for her son, James, and all her family and for all who mourn her.

             

            Prayers for Sammy K., Jay Benson and Michael Blair, all of whom had birthdays Jan. 1, graces galore and many more. Ad multos annos!

             

            Prayers for the vocation and perseverance of our postulant, Tim. He is doing well, may God sustain him with His grace. Prayers, too, for more vocations to St. Mary's Monastery. Please ask God to send us some more good men in 2017.

             

            Prayers for Ray, mental illness.

             

            The Christmas Octave is over, but the season of Christmastide lasts till the Baptism of the Lord, later this month, so keep on praying for those you have
            exchanged greetings, cards or gifts with. Make your intentions include those of years past, too, a nice way to include in prayer those dear ones no longer with us.

            Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
            mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            January 2, May 3, September 2
            Prologue (continued)

            Let us arise, then, at last,
            for the Scripture stirs us up, saying,
            "Now is the hour for us to rise from sleep" (Rom. 13:11).
            Let us open our eyes to the deifying light,
            let us hear with attentive ears
            the warning which the divine voice cries daily to us,
            "Today if you hear His voice,
            harden not your hearts" (Ps. 94:8).
            And again,
            "Whoever has ears to hear,
            hear what the Spirit says to the churches" (Matt. 11-15; Apoc. 2:7).
            And what does He say?
            "Come, My children, listen to Me;
            I will teach you the fear of the Lord" (Ps. 33:12).
            "Run while you have the light of life,
            lest the darkness of death overtake you" (John 12:35).

            REFLECTION

            Check out the similarities of this section, at the beginning of the
            Holy Rule, and the readings of early Lent, which stress that "now is
            the acceptable time." It brings to mind St. Benedict's later chapter
            which says that the monastic life ought always to have some semblance
            of Lent.

            That perpetual Lent chapter is the source of a lot of grumbling about
            austerity from one camp and cheering about it from another. Both may
            have missed a salient point. Perhaps the greatest element of
            perpetual Lent has less to do with austerity- even the monastic fast
            did not last all year. What IS perpetually in style is wakefulness
            and self-examination.

            Monastic life withers in either smugness or a rut. What St. Benedict
            wants us to do is always to try and stay at that serious moment of
            taking inventory that many of us feel at Lent's beginning. We need to
            always be checking what needs to be cleaned up and we need to be
            prepared, even a bit eager, to start working on it. New Year's is a

            perfect time for such examination, but keep it going all year.

            This is why a daily examination of conscience is so necessary.
            Compline, the traditional liturgical place for such examens, is a
            very apt place for same. As we prepare for sleep, which prefigures
            death, we prepare also for death, by examining our faults and asking
            forgiveness.

            The Holy Rule, like Lent, is by no means the gateway to an easier
            life, but to a holier one. As we actually grow in holiness much of it
            will become easier, more natural to us. But until that time, it is a
            struggle and, in unconquered areas, it remains something of a
            struggle for all of our lives. What's hard about that struggle isn't
            fasting or penance, but changing ourselves. Austere practices are
            just a means to that end, not ends in themselves.

            The whole idea of Lent and the Holy Rule is lasting change for the
            better. Lent is a seasonal construct to get us to begin anew, the
            Holy Rule says that beginning anew must be a daily thing. Lent is an
            attempt to get us to do for forty days what we ought to have been
            doing all year. The Holy Rule is a way to do what we ought to do all
            year, every day.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
            Petersham, MA

             

          • Br. Jerome Leo
            +PAX Prayers, please, for the eternal rest of our Sr. Mary Clare, foundress and first Prioress of St. Scholastica Priory, on the 2nd anniversary of her death.
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 1 2:53 PM

              +PAX

              Prayers, please, for the eternal rest of our Sr. Mary Clare, foundress and first Prioress of St. Scholastica Priory, on the 2nd anniversary of her death. We owe her so much, there would be no Petersham communities without her, and so many of us have a monastic home because of her. Prayers, too, for her family, and for the nuns and monks of Petersham. May she rest in peace and rise in glory!

               

              Prayers for our novice, Br. Luke, who injured his knee when he fell on some ice. Prayers for successful treatment of his injury and for strength and healing.

               

              Prayers for Sammy K., Jay Benson and Michael Blair, all of whom had birthdays Jan. 1, graces galore and many more. Ad multos annos!

               

              Prayers for Sue T., that she has the grace to grow older sweetly and that Jesus uses her to spread love to others.

               

              Prayers for Daniel, having trouble doing paperwork for retirement and Medicare, that he gets it all completed correctly and regains some calm that he lost through anxiety over this.

               

              Ardent prayers for a woman dying of breast cancer, perhaps in less than a week. She has not received the Sacraments and there may be some difficulty in getting her family to call for a priest. Prayers for her happy death and that she receives all the Sacraments and the Apostolic Pardon.

               

              Prayers for Sarah and her mum, Jill S., who is in hospital with pneumonia, following a fall, which broke her hip.

               

              Continued prayers for Sarah G., diagnosed with MND, (ALS/Lou Gehrig’s disease,) but has regained some use of her limbs. We have prayed for her before.

               

              Prayers for the eternal rest of Br. Benedict Cooper, OSB, of St. Leo Abbey, on the anniversary of his death.

               

              Prayers for Elaine, terrible problems and side effects from her draining sinuses since November 2. She is very frustrated by this, healing prayers.

               

              Healing prayers for Mildred, who had a stroke and cannot speak. Prayers, too, for her husband, Billy, and all their family.

               

              Prayers for Cas, for a speedy recovery from two large gastric ulcers. This is the same Cas we prayed for before who was very concerned about a family history of cancer, so Deo Gratias that no cancer was found.

              Prayers for Ray, mental illness.

               The Christmas Octave is over, but the season of Christmastide lasts till the Baptism of the Lord, so keep on praying for those you have exchanged greetings, cards or gifts with. Make your intentions include those of years past, too, a nice way to include in prayer those dear ones no longer with us.

              Lord, help us as You know and will. God's will is best. All is
              mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

              January 2, May 3, September 2
              Prologue (continued)

              Let us arise, then, at last,
              for the Scripture stirs us up, saying,
              "Now is the hour for us to rise from sleep" (Rom. 13:11).
              Let us open our eyes to the deifying light,
              let us hear with attentive ears
              the warning which the divine voice cries daily to us,
              "Today if you hear His voice,
              harden not your hearts" (Ps. 94:8).
              And again,
              "Whoever has ears to hear,
              hear what the Spirit says to the churches" (Matt. 11-15; Apoc. 2:7).
              And what does He say?
              "Come, My children, listen to Me;
              I will teach you the fear of the Lord" (Ps. 33:12).
              "Run while you have the light of life,
              lest the darkness of death overtake you" (John 12:35).

              REFLECTION

              Check out the similarities of this section, at the beginning of the
              Holy Rule, and the readings of early Lent, which stress that "now is
              the acceptable time." It brings to mind St. Benedict's later chapter
              which says that the monastic life ought always to have some semblance
              of Lent.

              That perpetual Lent chapter is the source of a lot of grumbling about
              austerity from one camp and cheering about it from another. Both may
              have missed a salient point. Perhaps the greatest element of
              perpetual Lent has less to do with austerity- even the monastic fast
              did not last all year. What IS perpetually in style is wakefulness
              and self-examination.

              Monastic life withers in either smugness or a rut. What St. Benedict
              wants us to do is always to try and stay at that serious moment of
              taking inventory that many of us feel at Lent's beginning. We need to
              always be checking what needs to be cleaned up and we need to be
              prepared, even a bit eager, to start working on it. New Year's is a

              perfect time for such examination, but keep it going all year.

              This is why a daily examination of conscience is so necessary.
              Compline, the traditional liturgical place for such examens, is a
              very apt place for same. As we prepare for sleep, which prefigures
              death, we prepare also for death, by examining our faults and asking
              forgiveness.

              The Holy Rule, like Lent, is by no means the gateway to an easier
              life, but to a holier one. As we actually grow in holiness much of it
              will become easier, more natural to us. But until that time, it is a
              struggle and, in unconquered areas, it remains something of a
              struggle for all of our lives. What's hard about that struggle isn't
              fasting or penance, but changing ourselves. Austere practices are
              just a means to that end, not ends in themselves.

              The whole idea of Lent and the Holy Rule is lasting change for the
              better. Lent is a seasonal construct to get us to begin anew, the
              Holy Rule says that beginning anew must be a daily thing. Lent is an
              attempt to get us to do for forty days what we ought to have been
              doing all year. The Holy Rule is a way to do what we ought to do all
              year, every day.

              Love and prayers,
              Jerome, OSB
              http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
              Petersham, MA

               

               

               

               

               

               

               

               

               

               

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