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Holy Rule for Dec. 23

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Prayers, please, for Amy, the car accident victim for who we prayed. She is home in MA now and mendable, but her boyfriend was with her in the crash and
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 23, 2004
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      +PAX

      Prayers, please, for Amy, the car accident victim for who we prayed. She is home in MA now and mendable, but her boyfriend was with her in the crash and did not survive. Lots and lot of prayers for the heartbreak there, for Amy, for the eternal rest of her beloved and for her parents, Sam and his wife, Pat. Prayers, too, for a colleague of Brian, 76, who has an inoperable brain tumor, now on aggressive chemo and radiation. Prayers for Ann, a spot on her lung to be biopsied, and for her nephew, Tom, who asked. Prayers for Norah, she is raising her grandson and he has been abducted, probably by his biological Mother and a friend. Big, big mess there, the little boy is particularly vulnerable. Prayers for Lillian, recovering from a heart stent, and for Davon, 12, who has cancer surgery facing her, a year after another large tumor was removed, also for Gail, gall bladder surgery on Monday. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much! JL

      April 23, August 23, December 23
      Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

      To us, therefore, it seems expedient
      for the preservation of peace and charity
      that the Abbot have in his hands
      the full administration of his monastery.
      And if possible let all the affairs of the monastery,
      as we have already arranged,
      be administered by deans according to the Abbot's directions.
      Thus, with the duties being shared by several,
      no one person will become proud.


      But if the circumstances of the place require it,
      or if the community asks for it with reason and with humility,
      and the Abbot judges it to be expedient,
      let the Abbot himself constitute as his Prior
      whomsoever he shall choose
      with the counsel of God-fearing brethren.


      That Prior, however, shall perform respectfully
      the duties enjoined on him by his Abbot
      and do nothing against the Abbot's will or direction;
      for the more he is raised above the rest,
      the more carefully should he observe the precepts of the Rule.


      If it should be found that the Prior has serious faults,
      or that he is deceived by his exaltation and yields to pride,
      or if he should be proved to be a despiser of the Holy Rule,
      let him be admonished verbally up to four times.
      If he fails to amend,
      let the correction of regular discipline be applied to him.
      But if even then he does not reform,
      let him be deposed from the office of Prior
      and another be appointed in his place who is worthy of it.
      And if afterwards he is not quiet and obedient in the community,
      let him even be expelled from the monastery.
      But the Abbot, for his part, should bear in mind
      that he will have to render an account to God
      for all his judgments,
      lest the flame of envy or jealousy be kindled in his soul.

      REFLECTION

      The overwhelming majority of us, myself included, are never going to
      be a Prior or Prioress. Firm grasp on the obvious there!! What,
      however, may we glean from this chapter? There are at least several
      possibilities.

      First, even if your position gives you a certain level of honor,
      never be so stupid as to believe it, to become proud, to take
      yourself far too seriously. Cling to a self-knowledge of your
      limitations, your sins and failings, especially when being praised.

      Yes, we are human, yes, it is nice to hear those things, yes,
      sometimes they are even close to the truth, but praise, rank and
      honor can be awful traps. Like crack cocaine, they can addict us the
      first time we really give in to them. Great caution is in order here.

      Second, every commitment to Christ, Baptism, Oblation or Profession,
      obliges us to a higher standard of self-control. The Holy Rule,
      because speaking of a superior official, uses the phrase "raised above the
      rest." This is given as a reason to more carefully observe the Holy Rule.

      We should read therein that ANY commitment which separates us
      and sets us further apart for the service of God means that we must
      more carefully observe the precepts of the Rule. Even though it can
      be quite annoying to hear, how often someone will say, immediately
      after a litany of transgressions the person has committed, "And she
      is an OBLATE!" (Or Franciscan Third Order, or whatever.) People
      expect more of us because of our religious inclinations and we should
      not disappoint them.

      Third, and perhaps most important of all, no one, save God alone, is
      indispensable. No one. Want to see the change that your removal from
      the scene will effect? Stick your forearm into a bucket of water, and
      then pull it out. Same thing, folks, the waters close right in and
      things go on quite nicely. The higher water level while our arm was
      there was only illusion anyway. This fact can work in happy concert
      with the above warning about taking ourselves too seriously. Usually,
      when we THINK we're hot stuff, we aren't, and even if we truly are at
      some point, it is FAR better not to know that, and a LOT easier for
      the spiritual struggle.

      Yes, we ARE important, we are infinitely important to God and, as a
      result, to each other. But what makes us so is holiness and love and
      struggling for virtue, not power.

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Robbie, newly diagnosed colon cancer, for his wife and daughter and all their family. Prayers for Dane Dungy, 18, son of a prominent
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 23, 2005
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        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Robbie, newly diagnosed colon cancer, for his wife and daughter and all their family. Prayers for Dane Dungy, 18, son of a prominent football coach in the US, who apparently committed suicide, for his parents and all their family.
        Prayers for Jennifer, schizophrenia, and for Jeffrey and Cindy, her parents and Liz, her grandmother. Prayers for Kaye, near death from leukemia, for her happy death and eternal rest and for all her family. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

        April 23, August 23, December 23
        Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

        To us, therefore, it seems expedient
        for the preservation of peace and charity
        that the Abbot have in his hands
        the full administration of his monastery.
        And if possible let all the affairs of the monastery,
        as we have already arranged,
        be administered by deans according to the Abbot's directions.
        Thus, with the duties being shared by several,
        no one person will become proud.


        But if the circumstances of the place require it,
        or if the community asks for it with reason and with humility,
        and the Abbot judges it to be expedient,
        let the Abbot himself constitute as his Prior
        whomsoever he shall choose
        with the counsel of God-fearing brethren.


        That Prior, however, shall perform respectfully
        the duties enjoined on him by his Abbot
        and do nothing against the Abbot's will or direction;
        for the more he is raised above the rest,
        the more carefully should he observe the precepts of the Rule.


        If it should be found that the Prior has serious faults,
        or that he is deceived by his exaltation and yields to pride,
        or if he should be proved to be a despiser of the Holy Rule,
        let him be admonished verbally up to four times.
        If he fails to amend,
        let the correction of regular discipline be applied to him.
        But if even then he does not reform,
        let him be deposed from the office of Prior
        and another be appointed in his place who is worthy of it.
        And if afterwards he is not quiet and obedient in the community,
        let him even be expelled from the monastery.
        But the Abbot, for his part, should bear in mind
        that he will have to render an account to God
        for all his judgments,
        lest the flame of envy or jealousy be kindled in his soul.

        REFLECTION

        The overwhelming majority of us, myself included, are never going to
        be a Prior or Prioress. Firm grasp on the obvious there!! What,
        however, may we glean from this chapter? There are at least several
        possibilities.

        First, even if your position gives you a certain level of honor,
        never be so stupid as to believe it, to become proud, to take
        yourself far too seriously. Cling to a self-knowledge of your
        limitations, your sins and failings, especially when being praised.

        Yes, we are human, yes, it is nice to hear those things, yes,
        sometimes they are even close to the truth, but praise, rank and
        honor can be awful traps. Like crack cocaine, they can addict us the
        first time we really give in to them. Great caution is in order here.

        Second, every commitment to Christ, Baptism, Oblation or Profession,
        obliges us to a higher standard of self-control. The Holy Rule,
        because speaking of a superior official, uses the phrase "raised above the
        rest." This is given as a reason to more carefully observe the Holy Rule.

        We should read therein that ANY commitment which separates us
        and sets us further apart for the service of God means that we must
        more carefully observe the precepts of the Rule. Even though it can
        be quite annoying to hear, how often someone will say, immediately
        after a litany of transgressions the person has committed, "And she
        is an OBLATE!" (Or Franciscan Third Order, or whatever.) People
        expect more of us because of our religious inclinations and we should
        not disappoint them.

        Third, and perhaps most important of all, no one, save God alone, is
        indispensable. No one. Want to see the change that your removal from
        the scene will effect? Stick your forearm into a bucket of water, and
        then pull it out. Same thing, folks, the waters close right in and
        things go on quite nicely. The higher water level while our arm was
        there was only illusion anyway. This fact can work in happy concert
        with the above warning about taking ourselves too seriously. Usually,
        when we THINK we're hot stuff, we aren't, and even if we truly are at
        some point, it is FAR better not to know that, and a LOT easier for
        the spiritual struggle.

        Yes, we ARE important, we are infinitely important to God and, as a
        result, to each other. But what makes us so is holiness and love and
        struggling for virtue, not power.

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX Herman writes from Indonesia to ask our prayers that Christians there will be safe over the Christmas holidays: there have been terror threats and
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 22, 2006
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          +PAX

          Herman writes from Indonesia to ask our prayers that Christians there will
          be safe over the Christmas holidays: there have been terror threats and
          warnings, violence is feared. Indeed, may ALL Christians, all peoples of all faiths
          be able to live in peace, at least during this holy time. May we pray that
          such peace may descend at all times, and be ourselves the first instruments of
          such peace on earth. Herman's post brings to mind how truly international a
          list we are. What a privilege to be so aware of His Mystical Body as we
          celebrate the birth of His Incarnate Body for the salvation of all!

          Prayers, please, for Jackson, liver cancer and for all his family. Prayers
          for all those who care for our prayer folks (and us!) spiritually, physically
          or mentally. There is so much love behind all those care-giving folks and it
          is the love of Gods that they show to us! May He reward them all. Lord, help
          us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God
          is never absent, praise Him. Thanks so much. JL

          April 23, August 23, December 23
          Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

          To us, therefore, it seems expedient
          for the preservation of peace and charity
          that the Abbot have in his hands
          the full administration of his monastery.
          And if possible let all the affairs of the monastery,
          as we have already arranged,
          be administered by deans according to the Abbot's directions.
          Thus, with the duties being shared by several,
          no one person will become proud.


          But if the circumstances of the place require it,
          or if the community asks for it with reason and with humility,
          and the Abbot judges it to be expedient,
          let the Abbot himself constitute as his Prior
          whomsoever he shall choose
          with the counsel of God-fearing brethren.


          That Prior, however, shall perform respectfully
          the duties enjoined on him by his Abbot
          and do nothing against the Abbot's will or direction;
          for the more he is raised above the rest,
          the more carefully should he observe the precepts of the Rule.


          If it should be found that the Prior has serious faults,
          or that he is deceived by his exaltation and yields to pride,
          or if he should be proved to be a despiser of the Holy Rule,
          let him be admonished verbally up to four times.
          If he fails to amend,
          let the correction of regular discipline be applied to him.
          But if even then he does not reform,
          let him be deposed from the office of Prior
          and another be appointed in his place who is worthy of it.
          And if afterwards he is not quiet and obedient in the community,
          let him even be expelled from the monastery.
          But the Abbot, for his part, should bear in mind
          that he will have to render an account to God
          for all his judgments,
          lest the flame of envy or jealousy be kindled in his soul.

          REFLECTION

          The overwhelming majority of us, myself included, are never going to
          be a Prior or Prioress. Firm grasp on the obvious there!! What,
          however, may we glean from this chapter? There are at least several
          possibilities.

          First, even if your position gives you a certain level of honor,
          never be so stupid as to believe it, to become proud, to take
          yourself far too seriously. Cling to a self-knowledge of your
          limitations, your sins and failings, especially when being praised.

          Yes, we are human, yes, it is nice to hear those things, yes,
          sometimes they are even close to the truth, but praise, rank and
          honor can be awful traps. Like crack cocaine, they can addict us the
          first time we really give in to them. Great caution is in order here.

          Second, every commitment to Christ, Baptism, Oblation or Profession,
          obliges us to a higher standard of self-control. The Holy Rule,
          because speaking of a superior official, uses the phrase "raised above the
          rest." This is given as a reason to more carefully observe the Holy Rule.

          We should read therein that ANY commitment which separates us
          and sets us further apart for the service of God means that we must
          more carefully observe the precepts of the Rule. Even though it can
          be quite annoying to hear, how often someone will say, immediately
          after a litany of transgressions the person has committed, "And she
          is an OBLATE!" (Or Franciscan Third Order, or whatever.) People
          expect more of us because of our religious inclinations and we should
          not disappoint them.

          Third, and perhaps most important of all, no one, save God alone, is
          indispensable. No one. Want to see the change that your removal from
          the scene will effect? Stick your forearm into a bucket of water, and
          then pull it out. Same thing, folks, the waters close right in and
          things go on quite nicely. The higher water level while our arm was
          there was only illusion anyway. This fact can work in happy concert
          with the above warning about taking ourselves too seriously. Usually,
          when we THINK we're hot stuff, we aren't, and even if we truly are at
          some point, it is FAR better not to know that, and a LOT easier for
          the spiritual struggle.

          Yes, we ARE important, we are infinitely important to God and, as a
          result, to each other. But what makes us so is holiness and love and
          struggling for virtue, not power. What makes us most like Him is
          humility.

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
          Petersham, MA



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all thier loved ones and all who take care of them: We have prayed
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 22, 2007
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            +PAX

            Prayers, please, for the spiritual, mental and physical health of the following, for all thier loved ones and all who take care of them:

            We have prayed for Kyra and Kina before, over a year ago when they were born preemie...they have been doing very well but now have breathing problems, possibly pneumonia...Kina is being admitted to hospital today and depending on results of Kyra's breathing treatment, she may be admitted also...Nikita is a single mom who is a wonderful mother.

            Someone who is having great difficulty conceiving. She and her husband are undergoing fertility treatments now and she has asked for prayers.

            Someone who is suffering from sexual and porn temptations, which seem worse around holiday times.

            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 23, August 23, December 23
            Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

            To us, therefore, it seems expedient
            for the preservation of peace and charity
            that the Abbot have in his hands
            the full administration of his monastery.
            And if possible let all the affairs of the monastery,
            as we have already arranged,
            be administered by deans according to the Abbot's directions.
            Thus, with the duties being shared by several,
            no one person will become proud.


            But if the circumstances of the place require it,
            or if the community asks for it with reason and with humility,
            and the Abbot judges it to be expedient,
            let the Abbot himself constitute as his Prior
            whomsoever he shall choose
            with the counsel of God-fearing brethren.


            That Prior, however, shall perform respectfully
            the duties enjoined on him by his Abbot
            and do nothing against the Abbot's will or direction;
            for the more he is raised above the rest,
            the more carefully should he observe the precepts of the Rule.


            If it should be found that the Prior has serious faults,
            or that he is deceived by his exaltation and yields to pride,
            or if he should be proved to be a despiser of the Holy Rule,
            let him be admonished verbally up to four times.
            If he fails to amend,
            let the correction of regular discipline be applied to him.
            But if even then he does not reform,
            let him be deposed from the office of Prior
            and another be appointed in his place who is worthy of it.
            And if afterwards he is not quiet and obedient in the community,
            let him even be expelled from the monastery.
            But the Abbot, for his part, should bear in mind
            that he will have to render an account to God
            for all his judgments,
            lest the flame of envy or jealousy be kindled in his soul.

            REFLECTION

            The overwhelming majority of us, myself included, are never going to
            be a Prior or Prioress. Firm grasp on the obvious there!! What,
            however, may we glean from this chapter? There are at least several
            possibilities.

            First, even if your position gives you a certain level of honor,
            never be so stupid as to believe it, to become proud, to take
            yourself far too seriously. Cling to a self-knowledge of your
            limitations, your sins and failings, especially when being praised.

            Yes, we are human, yes, it is nice to hear those things, yes,
            sometimes they are even close to the truth, but praise, rank and
            honor can be awful traps. Like crack cocaine, they can addict us the
            first time we really give in to them. Great caution is in order here.

            Second, every commitment to Christ, Baptism, Oblation or Profession,
            obliges us to a higher standard of self-control. The Holy Rule,
            because speaking of a superior official, uses the phrase "raised above the
            rest." This is given as a reason to more carefully observe the Holy Rule.

            We should read therein that ANY commitment which separates us
            and sets us further apart for the service of God means that we must
            more carefully observe the precepts of the Rule. Even though it can
            be quite annoying to hear, how often someone will say, immediately
            after a litany of transgressions the person has committed, "And she
            is an OBLATE!" (Or Franciscan Third Order, or whatever.) People
            expect more of us because of our religious inclinations and we should
            not disappoint them.

            Third, and perhaps most important of all, no one, save God alone, is
            indispensable. No one. Want to see the change that your removal from
            the scene will effect? Stick your forearm into a bucket of water, and
            then pull it out. Same thing, folks, the waters close right in and
            things go on quite nicely. The higher water level while our arm was
            there was only illusion anyway. This fact can work in happy concert
            with the above warning about taking ourselves too seriously. Usually,
            when we THINK we're hot stuff, we aren't, and even if we truly are at
            some point, it is FAR better not to know that, and a LOT easier for
            the spiritual struggle.

            Yes, we ARE important, we are infinitely important to God and, as a
            result, to each other. But what makes us so is holiness and love and
            struggling for virtue, not power. What makes us most like Him is
            humility.

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Br. Jerome Leo
            I accidentally omitted to cut out three prayer intentions from last year which I had pasted in. Hope this doesn t cause any inconvenience and I am sure God
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 22, 2010
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              I accidentally omitted to cut out three prayer intentions from last year which I had pasted in. Hope this doesn't cause any inconvenience and I am sure God will be glad to hear prayers for them again! JL

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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