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Holy Rule for Dec. 22

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  • Jerry Lee
    +PAX Mike, for whom we prayed, has died this morning of liver failure, he was only 46. He is the second son his Mom, Liz, has lost, her youngest, Lawrence,
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 22, 2004
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      +PAX

      Mike, for whom we prayed, has died this morning of liver failure, he was only 46. He is the second son his Mom, Liz, has lost, her youngest, Lawrence, having been killed in a car wreck some years ago. Please pray very hard for Mike, and for his brother, Lawrence, but pray especially for Liz, who needs strength and grace in this terrible loss. She was my French professor at St. Leo and is a life-long friend. I also ask special prayers for Fr. Louis Lambert, SJ, a Tampa priest went to the hospital to anoint Mike. Joane, for whom we prayed, got a good prognosis on her biopsy. Deo gratias! God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent. Alleluia! Thanks so much! JL

      April 22, August 22, December 22
      Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

      It happens all too often that the constituting of a Prior
      gives rise to grave scandals in monasteries.
      For there are some who become inflated with the evil spirit of pride
      and consider themselves second Abbots.
      By usurping power
      they foster scandals and cause dissensions in the community.
      Especially does this happen
      in those places where the Prior is constituted
      by the same Bishop or the same Abbots
      who constitute the Abbot himself.
      What an absurd procedure this is
      can easily be seen;
      for it gives the Prior an occasion for becoming proud
      from the very time of his constitution,
      by putting the thought into his mind
      that he is freed from the authority of his Abbot:
      "For," he will say to himself, "you were constituted
      by the same persons who constitute the Abbot."
      From this source are stirred up envy, quarrels, detraction,
      rivalry, dissensions and disorders.
      For while the Abbot and the Prior are at variance,
      their souls cannot but be endangered by this dissension;
      and those who are under them,
      currying favor with one side or the other,
      go to ruin.
      The guilt for this dangerous state of affairs
      rests on the heads of those
      whose action brought about such disorder.

      REFLECTION

      When I read the line about those governed "currying favor with one
      side or the other," I thought immediately of the children of divorce.
      Children, however, are quite perceptive, and it is not just divorce,
      but any noticeable drift between parents that they will manipulate.
      That is why, in family and monastery, unity in authority is very
      important.

      St. Benedict tries to guarantee this by letting the Abbot choose his
      own Prior, parents can do it by a struggle to overcome their own
      personal differences for the good of the children. This is not to say
      that the parents can necessarily get over their problems, but that
      they must at least try to be consistent with the children, for the
      children's sakes. As St. Benedict points out, this choosing of sides
      in child or monastic, can lead to ruin.

      Why does it lead to ruin? Because manipulation to some degree puts us
      in charge of ourselves, something no child and very, very few
      monastics are strong enough to be. As St. Bernard of Clairvaux
      said: "The one who has himself for a master has a fool for a
      disciple." One reason we took obedience upon ourselves was our
      knowledge of our own weakness. This knowledge can fade and dim with
      time, we can be convinced we know better. Sometimes, perhaps, we do,
      but in most cases, obedience is a real protection from harm.
      Benedictines not only are not in charge of themselves, but, as the
      Holy Rule defines cenobitic community life, they "desire" this lack
      of control. They "desire to live under a Rule and an Abbot."

      One cannot expect children to be wise enough to see how good and
      necessary obedience is at every turn, but it shouldn't be much of a
      stretch for us adults!

      Love and prayers,
      Jerome, OSB
      http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
      jeromeleo@...
      Petersham, MA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jerry Lee
      +PAX Prayers, please, for Liz and her son, Mike, 47. This is the first anniversary of his death from alcoholism and very, very hard. She had lost another son
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 22, 2005
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        +PAX

        Prayers, please, for Liz and her son, Mike, 47. This is the first anniversary of his death from alcoholism and very, very hard. She had lost another son in a car accident years ago. Pray for her return to the Faith, too, please. Prayers for A., health issues, despondent, needing God's strength and for her worried parents. Prayers for Doris, second facial surgery for melanoma and for her husband of 50 years, Joe. Prayers for Matt and his children, the custody should be decided today. Prayers for RB, early colon cancer diagnosis, and for his wife and family, also for Bob, leukemia and his daughters, Colleen, kidney cancer and Patty, breast cancer and for all their family. Prayers for Ann, lymphoma and Rosalie, having mini-strokes. Prayers for Mary Faith, 1 yr. old, seizures of unknown cause and for her worried family. Prayers, too, for all the doctors caring for all these folks: they are truly God's instruments, may they be most open to His will and guidance.

        Barry, for whom we prayed, died peacefully of his cancer at home yesterday, as he had wished, surrounded by family. Deo gratias! Prayers for his happy death, eternal rest and for Beverly, his wife and all their family.

        Prayers for Joe and Martha and their 2 daughters. Very messy divorce. Mother is seriously disturbed to unjustly trying to deny Joe all contact with his children. Prayers for a convert who still has a lot of bitterness to deal with regarding the church she left. Lord, help them as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, Praise Him! Thanks so much! JL

        April 22, August 22, December 22
        Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

        It happens all too often that the constituting of a Prior
        gives rise to grave scandals in monasteries.
        For there are some who become inflated with the evil spirit of pride
        and consider themselves second Abbots.
        By usurping power
        they foster scandals and cause dissensions in the community.
        Especially does this happen
        in those places where the Prior is constituted
        by the same Bishop or the same Abbots
        who constitute the Abbot himself.
        What an absurd procedure this is
        can easily be seen;
        for it gives the Prior an occasion for becoming proud
        from the very time of his constitution,
        by putting the thought into his mind
        that he is freed from the authority of his Abbot:
        "For," he will say to himself, "you were constituted
        by the same persons who constitute the Abbot."
        From this source are stirred up envy, quarrels, detraction,
        rivalry, dissensions and disorders.
        For while the Abbot and the Prior are at variance,
        their souls cannot but be endangered by this dissension;
        and those who are under them,
        currying favor with one side or the other,
        go to ruin.
        The guilt for this dangerous state of affairs
        rests on the heads of those
        whose action brought about such disorder.

        REFLECTION

        When I read the line about those governed "currying favor with one
        side or the other," I thought immediately of the children of divorce.
        Children, however, are quite perceptive, and it is not just divorce,
        but any noticeable drift between parents that they will manipulate.
        That is why, in family and monastery, unity in authority is very
        important.

        St. Benedict tries to guarantee this by letting the Abbot choose his
        own Prior, parents can do it by a struggle to overcome their own
        personal differences for the good of the children. This is not to say
        that the parents can necessarily get over their problems, but that
        they must at least try to be consistent with the children, for the
        children's sakes. As St. Benedict points out, this choosing of sides
        in child or monastic, can lead to ruin.

        Why does it lead to ruin? Because manipulation to some degree puts us
        in charge of ourselves, something no child and very, very few
        monastics are strong enough to be. As St. Bernard of Clairvaux
        said: "The one who has himself for a master has a fool for a
        disciple." One reason we took obedience upon ourselves was our
        knowledge of our own weakness. This knowledge can fade and dim with
        time, we can be convinced we know better. Sometimes, perhaps, we do,
        but in most cases, obedience is a real protection from harm.
        Benedictines not only are not in charge of themselves, but, as the
        Holy Rule defines cenobitic community life, they "desire" this lack
        of control. They "desire to live under a Rule and an Abbot."

        One cannot expect children to be wise enough to see how good and
        necessary obedience is at every turn, but it shouldn't be much of a
        stretch for us adults!

        Love and prayers,
        Jerome, OSB
        http://www.stmarysmonastery.org
        jeromeleo@...
        Petersham, MA

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Brjeromeleo@aol.com
        +PAX Prayers, please, for Margaret L., rushed to the hospital with a heart attack and then found to be critically ill with cancer. There is nothing they can
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 21, 2006
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          +PAX

          Prayers, please, for Margaret L., rushed to the hospital with a heart attack
          and then found to be critically ill with cancer. There is nothing they can
          do for her and she has been given little time to live. Prayers for her happy
          death and eternal rest and for all her family and those who love her. Prayers
          for the safety of all travelling during this holiday period. Prayers for
          Father Peter, removed from ministry because of credible abuse allegations and for
          his stunned parishioners. Prayers for Mike, on the anniversary of his death
          and for Liz, his Mom. Prayers that the hearts of many who rarely think of God
          may turn to Him in the Christmas season and be touched and converted. Lord,
          help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. God is never absent,
          praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

          April 22, August 22, December 22
          Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

          It happens all too often that the constituting of a Prior
          gives rise to grave scandals in monasteries.
          For there are some who become inflated with the evil spirit of pride
          and consider themselves second Abbots.
          By usurping power
          they foster scandals and cause dissensions in the community.
          Especially does this happen
          in those places where the Prior is constituted
          by the same Bishop or the same Abbots
          who constitute the Abbot himself.
          What an absurd procedure this is
          can easily be seen;
          for it gives the Prior an occasion for becoming proud
          from the very time of his constitution,
          by putting the thought into his mind
          that he is freed from the authority of his Abbot:
          "For," he will say to himself, "you were constituted
          by the same persons who constitute the Abbot."
          From this source are stirred up envy, quarrels, detraction,
          rivalry, dissensions and disorders.
          For while the Abbot and the Prior are at variance,
          their souls cannot but be endangered by this dissension;
          and those who are under them,
          currying favor with one side or the other,
          go to ruin.
          The guilt for this dangerous state of affairs
          rests on the heads of those
          whose action brought about such disorder.

          REFLECTION

          When I read the line about those governed "currying favor with one
          side or the other," I thought immediately of the children of divorce.
          Children, however, are quite perceptive, and it is not just divorce,
          but any noticeable drift between parents that they will manipulate.
          That is why, in family and monastery, unity in authority is very
          important.

          St. Benedict tries to guarantee this by letting the Abbot choose his
          own Prior, parents can do it by a struggle to overcome their own
          personal differences for the good of the children. This is not to say
          that the parents can necessarily get over their problems, but that
          they must at least try to be consistent with the children, for the
          children's sakes. As St. Benedict points out, this choosing of sides
          in child or monastic, can lead to ruin.

          Why does it lead to ruin? Because manipulation to some degree puts us
          in charge of ourselves, something no child and very, very few
          monastics are strong enough to be. As St. Bernard of Clairvaux
          said: "The one who has himself for a master has a fool for a
          disciple." One reason we took obedience upon ourselves was our
          knowledge of our own weakness. This knowledge can fade and dim with
          time, we can be convinced we know better. Sometimes, perhaps, we do,
          but in most cases, obedience is a real protection from harm.
          Benedictines not only are not in charge of themselves, but, as the
          Holy Rule defines cenobitic community life, they "desire" this lack
          of control. They "desire to live under a Rule and an Abbot."

          One cannot expect children to be wise enough to see how good and
          necessary obedience is at every turn, but it shouldn't be much of a
          stretch for us adults!

          Love and prayers,
          Jerome, OSB
          _http://www.stmarysmonastery.org_ (http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/)
          _brjeromeleo@..._ (mailto:brjeromeleo@...)
          Petersham, MA




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Br. Jerome Leo
          +PAX Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of the following and for all who will mourn them: Sr. Mary Stella, sent home because the hospital can do
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 21, 2007
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            +PAX

            Prayers for the happy death and eternal rest of the following and for all who will mourn them:

            Sr. Mary Stella, sent home because the hospital can do nothing more for her.

            Jane's Dad, tired but hanging on to say goddbye to everybody.

            Tom, 9, who died in a fire trying to save his dog, and for his Dad, who tired to save Tom but couldn't, and for all their family.

            Prayers for the physical, mental and spiritual health of thhe following, for all their loved ones and all who take care of them:

            Dan and Nichola, for whom we have prayed, have begun making slow progress and having some of their many injuries surgically treated, so continued prayers, please, and for their 3 sons.

            Lord, help us all as You know and will. God's will is best. All is mercy and grace. God is never absent, praise Him! Thanks so much. JL

            April 22, August 22, December 22
            Chapter 65: On the Prior of the Monastery

            It happens all too often that the constituting of a Prior
            gives rise to grave scandals in monasteries.
            For there are some who become inflated with the evil spirit of pride
            and consider themselves second Abbots.
            By usurping power
            they foster scandals and cause dissensions in the community.
            Especially does this happen
            in those places where the Prior is constituted
            by the same Bishop or the same Abbots
            who constitute the Abbot himself.
            What an absurd procedure this is
            can easily be seen;
            for it gives the Prior an occasion for becoming proud
            from the very time of his constitution,
            by putting the thought into his mind
            that he is freed from the authority of his Abbot:
            "For," he will say to himself, "you were constituted
            by the same persons who constitute the Abbot."
            From this source are stirred up envy, quarrels, detraction,
            rivalry, dissensions and disorders.
            For while the Abbot and the Prior are at variance,
            their souls cannot but be endangered by this dissension;
            and those who are under them,
            currying favor with one side or the other,
            go to ruin.
            The guilt for this dangerous state of affairs
            rests on the heads of those
            whose action brought about such disorder.

            REFLECTION

            When I read the line about those governed "currying favor with one
            side or the other," I thought immediately of the children of divorce.
            Children, however, are quite perceptive, and it is not just divorce,
            but any noticeable drift between parents that they will manipulate.
            That is why, in family and monastery, unity in authority is very
            important.

            St. Benedict tries to guarantee this by letting the Abbot choose his
            own Prior, parents can do it by a struggle to overcome their own
            personal differences for the good of the children. This is not to say
            that the parents can necessarily get over their problems, but that
            they must at least try to be consistent with the children, for the
            children's sakes. As St. Benedict points out, this choosing of sides
            in child or monastic, can lead to ruin.

            Why does it lead to ruin? Because manipulation to some degree puts us
            in charge of ourselves, something no child and very, very few
            monastics are strong enough to be. As St. Bernard of Clairvaux
            said: "The one who has himself for a master has a fool for a
            disciple." One reason we took obedience upon ourselves was our
            knowledge of our own weakness. This knowledge can fade and dim with
            time, we can be convinced we know better. Sometimes, perhaps, we do,
            but in most cases, obedience is a real protection from harm.
            Benedictines not only are not in charge of themselves, but, as the
            Holy Rule defines cenobitic community life, they "desire" this lack
            of control. They "desire to live under a Rule and an Abbot."

            One cannot expect children to be wise enough to see how good and
            necessary obedience is at every turn, but it shouldn't be much of a
            stretch for us adults!

            Love and prayers,
            Jerome, OSB
            http://www.stmarysmonastery.org/

            Petersham, MA







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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